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1951 Commander tires

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  • rockne10
    replied
    Radials drive and ride better than bias but do not have the life expectancy. Worth the investment if you plan on enjoying putting miles on your ride.
    I believe companies that reproduce tires for the antique market use old molds procured from the original manufacturer, and these often display why they were retired. I bought new tires for my '33 from the major antique supplier and can barely read the tire size in the mold. Though I must say they have held up as well as I could hope.
    What I like about Diamond Back is they procure fresh new tires from the major manufacturers and vulcanize the desired white wall, or red line, in to a factory new tire. You do lose the tire manufacturer's warranty, supplanted by DB's own limited warranty.

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by Kurt View Post
    Coker has bias ply wide whites for just under $200 apiece. Blackwalls are about 180 and American Clasics are $278. Not cheap.you could buy 4 P215 75R15 on sale at Walmart for what one American classic would cost. That is what I did 13 years ago when I got the car. Now that I am restoring and those tires are getting old I am looking at other options.

    Again in thanks for all the input
    Those radials are not "getting old" at 13 years, they are past due for replacement (regardless of miles driven).

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  • Kurt
    replied
    Originally posted by mbstude View Post
    Hey Kurt, within the last couple of months, both the ‘47 Land Cruiser and ‘53 Commander hardtop that are here were treated to a new set of Coker bias ply wide whites. Both cars had 10+ year old Coker Classic wide white radials on them previously. The radials were coming apart due to age as neither car sees many miles.

    Given the limited amount of miles you plan on doing, you’d get more for your money if you went the bias ply route. A set of 4 is north of $800, but at 500 miles a year and being stored indoors, they’ll still be good in 15 years.

    Btw, glad to hear you’re giving your 51 a thorough redo. I remember seeing the car in Cedar Rapids. Looking forward to seeing pics of it finished.
    i have driven the car a little over 5000 miles in a little over 13 years. Grandpa bought it in 1983 and drove it about the same mileage in 21 years. That is why we have a very nice 51 Stude with less than 40,000 miles. So yeah the bias make sense and look right.

    thanks for for the kind words about the car. You have a good memory. I wasn’t sure if you remembered our visit,and the car, in Cedar Rapids.

    I was 16 when Gramps brought this car home. I inherited this car when he passed, which is even more special because my Grandfather never gave anyone anything. You had to earn it. It is pretty special to me. What started out as a simple repaint has turned into quite a project. I keep telling myself that this car deserves a proper refurbish/ restoration and it’s going to get it....

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Crandall View Post
    Referencing posts #2 and #11. Did you keep original rims? If you did, then did you use tubes? Thanks.
    Most all 1951 and Newer Wheels do not require Tubes, never had a '51-'66 Stude. Wheel leak mounted tubeless.

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  • jackb
    replied
    If you buy the bias ply tires, with your driving demands, put the car up on blocks. Although...likely you'll be driving on hot roads so they will stretch out after some few miles. Also, relating to road conditions..... they do change from state to state, especially on 2-lane roads..

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  • Robert Crandall
    replied
    Referencing posts #2 and #11. Did you keep original rims? If you did, then did you use tubes? Thanks.

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  • mbstude
    replied
    Hey Kurt, within the last couple of months, both the ‘47 Land Cruiser and ‘53 Commander hardtop that are here were treated to a new set of Coker bias ply wide whites. Both cars had 10+ year old Coker Classic wide white radials on them previously. The radials were coming apart due to age as neither car sees many miles.

    Given the limited amount of miles you plan on doing, you’d get more for your money if you went the bias ply route. A set of 4 is north of $800, but at 500 miles a year and being stored indoors, they’ll still be good in 15 years.

    Btw, glad to hear you’re giving your 51 a thorough redo. I remember seeing the car in Cedar Rapids. Looking forward to seeing pics of it finished.
    Last edited by mbstude; 02-28-2018, 04:03 AM.

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  • Kurt
    replied
    Originally posted by TWChamp View Post
    I feel the same way, and was wondering where you buy these and how much do they cost?

    My 1950 Land Cruiser needs tires due to age cracking, but due to cost, I bought a set of 4 radial narrow white walls for $278.
    They look nice, but would have looked better with wide white walls, especially for an all black car.
    Coker has bias ply wide whites for just under $200 apiece. Blackwalls are about 180 and American Clasics are $278. Not cheap.you could buy 4 P215 75R15 on sale at Walmart for what one American classic would cost. That is what I did 13 years ago when I got the car. Now that I am restoring and those tires are getting old I am looking at other options.

    Again in thanks for all the input

    Leave a comment:


  • JRoberts
    replied
    This has nothing to do with which tires are best for '51 or any other Studebaker older car or truck. What it does have to do with is the cost of tires. When the $300 per tire was mentioned, I did not read that with surprise. I recently bought two BFGoodrich TA Radial tires for my Cruiser and the price was much higher than I had ever paid for those tires (I have used them on a couple Studebakers over the years). The same was with tires I purchased for my F150 pickup. Two tires from it cost over the $300 dollar price mentioned here. Just be aware that any good tire cost much more these days than when we purchased the last set of the same tire.

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    Originally posted by Kurt View Post
    that is why I am thinking about bias 7.10-15 tires. They look right on the car. They will be new. I will probably only drive the car 500 miles a year.
    I feel the same way, and was wondering where you buy these and how much do they cost?

    My 1950 Land Cruiser needs tires due to age cracking, but due to cost, I bought a set of 4 radial narrow white walls for $278.
    They look nice, but would have looked better with wide white walls, especially for an all black car.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kurt
    replied
    Originally posted by studegary View Post
    Any time you replaced quite old tires with new tires, the ride will improve. I have replaced ten year old tires on a car using the same brand, model and size. There was a noticeable improvement in the ride and handling.
    that is why I am thinking about bias 7.10-15 tires. They look right on the car. They will be new. I will probably only drive the car 500 miles a year.

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by Kurt View Post
    Thanks for the input. I have had radials on it for the last 13 years. it does drive a little better than when it had the old bias tires on it. I have really never liked the look of modern tires on this car. If I go with radials I will go with the ones that look lik the originals. At nearly $300 apiece I wonder if they are really that much better. Any opinions on that?
    Any time you replaced quite old tires with new tires, the ride will improve. I have replaced ten year old tires on a car using the same brand, model and size. There was a noticeable improvement in the ride and handling.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kurt
    replied
    Thanks for the input. I have had radials on it for the last 13 years. it does drive a little better than when it had the old bias tires on it. I have really never liked the look of modern tires on this car. If I go with radials I will go with the ones that look lik the originals. At nearly $300 apiece I wonder if they are really that much better. Any opinions on that?

    Leave a comment:


  • TWChamp
    replied
    Thunderations, that's interesting about the quality of the road surface. My 1950 Champion has 205-75-15 tires and handles great.
    My 1928 Model A has the 4.50 x 21" bias tires, and gets pulled a bit side to side by the ruts in the road.
    The strange thing is though, 9 years ago I drove my Model A to South Dakota, and purposely drove on the rumble strip on the side of the road.
    I expected it to make a loud roar, but it was totally silent. I still can't explain that one.

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  • thunderations
    replied
    The bias ply/radial conversations has many twists and turns, facts and opinions.
    I had the opportunity to talk with an old highway paving foreman a few years ago that threw another monkey wrench into the discussion. It had to do with the smoothness and levelness of paving, both concrete and asphalt.
    When there were no radial tires the tolerances for smooth and level were more rigid so that ruts and crowns didn't cause as much road wander or sudden direction change.
    Once radial tires became the norm, those tolerances became more lax because the tire performance compensated for the different road conditions.
    I hope, with modern technology, that paving is better then it was 40 or 50 years ago, but have been on some fairly new highways that are not very smooth.
    Bottom line is that once radials were the common tires used, roads were not as good as before and those driving on bias ply tires were at an even worse disadvantage then before. Something to think about, huh?

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