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  • They're still out there!

    'Just got my January-February White Triangle News in this morning's mail; the bi-monthly publication of The Hudson-Essex-Terraplane Club. There's an unbelievable story in it by regular columnist Richard Polese. He is the "Dick Quinn" of WTN, writing an interesting column of Hudson bits and pieces avery month. (Maybe that assignment in car clubs falls to people named Richard.[?])

    Anyway, Richard Polese reported driving along a former Main Street in Trinidad Colorado last fall, looking for an I-25 onramp, late for an appointment elsewhere. He thought he spotted the front end of a 1920s Essex in an old showroom window of what was now a used car lot. He had no time to check it out then, but made a note of where it was and returned a month or so later.

    'Turns out the facility used to be a new-car dealership, Hadad Motors Sales Dodge. It's no longer that, but proprietor Joe Hadad still runs a used-car lot out of the building. Back in 1972, Joe took the Essex (a 1922 coupe, it proved to be) in trade on a new Dodge Monaco! Joe even had a period newspaper clipping and photograph of the Essex owner and the Dodge dealer making the deal.

    The little Essex wasn't for sale and never has been; just enjoying its life in an old showroom. Columnist Richard Polese was well-received by Joe Hadad and permitted to look over the car to his heart's content.

    Now here's what caught my attention: Joe Hadad said the car had been there for 35 years and Richard was the first person in The Hudson-Essex-Terraplane Club to stop in and inquire about it...in 35 years!" It's hard telling who was more surprised about that; Mr. Polese or Mr. Hadad.

    Unbelievable. We in Studebaker-land need to still keep our eyes open! [:0] BP



    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    So true, Bob.

    Visited a friend last week in California...he showed me the '63 R2 Avanti he just bought. Sitting in a garage in San Francisco for 35 years. Dusty, but solid and complete. $6k. He'll probably be cruising in it in a week [8D].


    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

    Comment


    • #3
      So true, Bob.

      Visited a friend last week in California...he showed me the '63 R2 Avanti he just bought. Sitting in a garage in San Francisco for 35 years. Dusty, but solid and complete. $6k. He'll probably be cruising in it in a week [8D].


      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

        So true, Bob.

        Visited a friend last week in California...he showed me the '63 R2 Avanti he just bought. Sitting in a garage in San Francisco for 35 years. Dusty, but solid and complete. $6k. He'll probably be cruising in it in a week [8D].


        [8D] COOL BEANS![8D] BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

          So true, Bob.

          Visited a friend last week in California...he showed me the '63 R2 Avanti he just bought. Sitting in a garage in San Francisco for 35 years. Dusty, but solid and complete. $6k. He'll probably be cruising in it in a week [8D].


          [8D] COOL BEANS![8D] BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

          Comment


          • #6
            I guess this means that I'd better hurry up and check out the Packard I saw setting in a barn not about 3 miles from me.


            Joe Roberts
            '61 R1 Champ
            '65 Cruiser
            Editor of "The Down Easterner"
            Eastern North Carolina Chapter
            Joe Roberts
            '61 R1 Champ
            '65 Cruiser
            Eastern North Carolina Chapter

            Comment


            • #7
              I guess this means that I'd better hurry up and check out the Packard I saw setting in a barn not about 3 miles from me.


              Joe Roberts
              '61 R1 Champ
              '65 Cruiser
              Editor of "The Down Easterner"
              Eastern North Carolina Chapter
              Joe Roberts
              '61 R1 Champ
              '65 Cruiser
              Eastern North Carolina Chapter

              Comment


              • #8
                About ten years ago I got a call from a real estate agent who was handling the sale of a house in DC for the estate of an old lady who had recently died. He called me because he had heard that I collected old cars, and there was an old car in the garage that they wanted to get rid of. It was a separate one-car garage facing an alley, and the car was a 1930 Oakland 4-door sedan. The license plates were from 1952. I had no interest in the car, but got them in touch with the local Pontiac-Oakland Club. They found a buyer for it. I can't imagine the estate got much for it.

                Skip Lackie
                Washington DC
                Skip Lackie

                Comment


                • #9
                  About ten years ago I got a call from a real estate agent who was handling the sale of a house in DC for the estate of an old lady who had recently died. He called me because he had heard that I collected old cars, and there was an old car in the garage that they wanted to get rid of. It was a separate one-car garage facing an alley, and the car was a 1930 Oakland 4-door sedan. The license plates were from 1952. I had no interest in the car, but got them in touch with the local Pontiac-Oakland Club. They found a buyer for it. I can't imagine the estate got much for it.

                  Skip Lackie
                  Washington DC
                  Skip Lackie

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Skip, I can do you one better. At the Atantic Zone Meet in Martinsburg WV in 2000 a Realtor came by the Keystone Raffle Car booth and said he had a Studebaker for sale and he had to sell the car to sell the property. He said the car was located in Waynesboro, PA. Being formally from the area, Mike M, Jack Fremau and a couple more jumped into a car and headed north as the pictures he had shown us was of a very drivable 41 Double-Dater Commander. Needless to say it didn't last long and is safely in the hands of a long time Keystoner who bought it from the estate of Jack Fremau, long time Keystoner and Store Master. Come to Lancaster in September as I know the car will be there. If you want take a 90 mile drive north on Saturday (02/02/08) and join us in Chambersburg, PA at tour business meeting and Ice Festival visit.

                    See you in the future as I write about our past
                    sigpicSee you in the future as I write about our past

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Skip, I can do you one better. At the Atantic Zone Meet in Martinsburg WV in 2000 a Realtor came by the Keystone Raffle Car booth and said he had a Studebaker for sale and he had to sell the car to sell the property. He said the car was located in Waynesboro, PA. Being formally from the area, Mike M, Jack Fremau and a couple more jumped into a car and headed north as the pictures he had shown us was of a very drivable 41 Double-Dater Commander. Needless to say it didn't last long and is safely in the hands of a long time Keystoner who bought it from the estate of Jack Fremau, long time Keystoner and Store Master. Come to Lancaster in September as I know the car will be there. If you want take a 90 mile drive north on Saturday (02/02/08) and join us in Chambersburg, PA at tour business meeting and Ice Festival visit.

                      See you in the future as I write about our past
                      sigpicSee you in the future as I write about our past

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

                        Now here's what caught my attention: Joe Hadad said the car had been there for 35 years and Richard was the first person in The Hudson-Essex-Terraplane Club to stop in and inquire about it...in 35 years!" It's hard telling who was more surprised about that; Mr. Polese or Mr. Hadad.

                        Unbelievable. We in Studebaker-land need to still keep our eyes open! [:0] BP
                        Bob, in 1983 on my way to South Bend for that year's International Meet, I stopped in at the Brooks Stevens Museum in Mequon, Wisconsin. I had the impression the facility would have been over-run with SDCers who may have also been heading eastwards to the meet as it is rather close to SB, but much to my surprise, I was the first one to visit. The only other person that I know of who attended at that time was Fred K. Fox who went to visit ex-Stude dealer, Fred Bartz in Manitowoc after the meet, and then it was only at my insistence that he stop there. In 1988, I stopped in a second time as I got a 28mm lens to get better photographs of the cars in there. Again, I discovered I was the only one from SDC to visit at meet time. Talking to the curator of the museum, he stated that more Europeans came to visit than North Americans for one reason or another, and he hardly ever saw any Studebaker people. Perhaps because of the very little foot traffic, on both instances when I was there, I was able to 'look over the cars to my heart's content', as you say, including sitting behind the wheel of all three of the Studebaker prototypes, and taking as many pictures as I liked, some which I have posted here previously. Unfortunately, the Brooks Stevens Museum was closed right after his passing in 1995, so that opportunity of getting to see those cars 'close-up' has probably been lost forever, but indeed, it pays to investigate these facilities that aren't as well advertized as the ACD or the Henry Ford Museum, etc.

                        Craig

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

                          Now here's what caught my attention: Joe Hadad said the car had been there for 35 years and Richard was the first person in The Hudson-Essex-Terraplane Club to stop in and inquire about it...in 35 years!" It's hard telling who was more surprised about that; Mr. Polese or Mr. Hadad.

                          Unbelievable. We in Studebaker-land need to still keep our eyes open! [:0] BP
                          Bob, in 1983 on my way to South Bend for that year's International Meet, I stopped in at the Brooks Stevens Museum in Mequon, Wisconsin. I had the impression the facility would have been over-run with SDCers who may have also been heading eastwards to the meet as it is rather close to SB, but much to my surprise, I was the first one to visit. The only other person that I know of who attended at that time was Fred K. Fox who went to visit ex-Stude dealer, Fred Bartz in Manitowoc after the meet, and then it was only at my insistence that he stop there. In 1988, I stopped in a second time as I got a 28mm lens to get better photographs of the cars in there. Again, I discovered I was the only one from SDC to visit at meet time. Talking to the curator of the museum, he stated that more Europeans came to visit than North Americans for one reason or another, and he hardly ever saw any Studebaker people. Perhaps because of the very little foot traffic, on both instances when I was there, I was able to 'look over the cars to my heart's content', as you say, including sitting behind the wheel of all three of the Studebaker prototypes, and taking as many pictures as I liked, some which I have posted here previously. Unfortunately, the Brooks Stevens Museum was closed right after his passing in 1995, so that opportunity of getting to see those cars 'close-up' has probably been lost forever, but indeed, it pays to investigate these facilities that aren't as well advertized as the ACD or the Henry Ford Museum, etc.

                          Craig

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            One reason could be that Trinidad is not exactly on the way to anywhere.

                            steve blake
                            http://tinyurl.com/kr3gt
                            steve blake...roaming the Texas Panhandle in my trusty Champ pickup
                            http://tinyurl.com/kr3gt

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              One reason could be that Trinidad is not exactly on the way to anywhere.

                              steve blake
                              http://tinyurl.com/kr3gt
                              steve blake...roaming the Texas Panhandle in my trusty Champ pickup
                              http://tinyurl.com/kr3gt

                              Comment

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