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  • Jackstand suggestions ?

    Readers, I'm asking for advice from much more experienced folks than I. My recently-acquired 1948 M16 truck definitely needs brakes; the brake pedal is easier to push to the floor than is the clutch pedal. Since it will likely have to spend a bit of time up on jackstands while I accumulate whatever parts I find it'll need, I want it to be securely supported. To that end I ask: will 3-ton (rated per pair) jackstands be sufficient, or will I have to move up to 6-ton ones? It's a cab-and-chassis only so no bed weight for the rear, but I've not had to consider supporting a heavy vehicle before; the stands I do have right now, I wouldn't feel comfortable using...they're not sturdy-looking enough. It will be in that raised position on an asphalt driveway, thus I'm considering making a set of basic jack plates to go under the stands so they don't sink into the asphalt; is that overkill ? Thanks.
    Mike Auldridge
    Gaithersburg, MD
    301-651-4346
    SDC Life Member since 1976
    1948 M16
    1961 Lark VIII convertible (with minor mods)

  • #2
    If it were Me, I'd go with the 6 ton instead of the 3 ton. I would certainly put something under the stands to protect the pavement from the stand legs. though make sure what ever you put under the stands is quite rigid so it can't mis shape.
    Joseph R. Zeiger

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    • #3
      Three ton means 6,000 pounds! You sure don't need more than that unless you are dealing with a fully loaded semi truck!

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      • #4
        As a rule, I try not to raise the insert on jack stands more than two clicks. I know they will go higher but I have been under a vehicle when it was not supported well and will not do it again. If I need them to go higher I break out the lumber - 2X12s cut into short sections work pretty well - and the sharp parts of the jack stand base usually digs into the wood making a little more stable.

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        • #5
          On asphalt, plates or even a good board under each jackstand is never overkill.

          Also, I've moved away from the sheet metal (and often 3 legged) jackstands in favor of the (often orange & white colored) ratcheting, 4 legged "cast iron" ones.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by skyway View Post
            On asphalt, plates or even a good board under each jackstand is never overkill.

            Also, I've moved away from the sheet metal (and often 3 legged) jackstands in favor of the (often orange & white colored) ratcheting, 4 legged "cast iron" ones.
            Ditto, many years ago, when I was a teenager, I bought some stamped steel 3 leg jack stands from K Mart, and one of them collapsed while I was part way under the car. They are junk and shouldn't even be used for a lawn mower. They are also too unstable.
            I have both the 3 ton ratchet style heavy duty 4 leg stands that I use for my cars, and the 6 ton that I would use for trucks. I cut squares out of 3/4" plywood and screwed 3/4" x 1" wood strips around the border to make sure the stand can't slide off the wood pad.

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            • #7
              Without a bed on the back, your truck probably weighs about 6000 pounds, so a couple of three-ton jack stands are more than enough for one end. However, it might take more than a couple of clicks to get the truck very high. The advantage of 6-ton units is that they're bigger in all dimensions, so two clicks is good enough to work under it easily. I have some 6-ton units, and They're 15-16 inches high in the down position.

              As has been said, a few short pieces of 2x12" are always a good idea when working on blacktop.
              Last edited by Skip Lackie; 12-13-2017, 11:56 AM.
              Skip Lackie

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              • #8
                I agree that bigger is better when it comes to jack stands. The slabs of wood under each stand certainly can' t hurt either.
                Joe Roberts
                '61 R1 Champ
                '65 Cruiser
                Eastern North Carolina Chapter

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                • #9
                  My thanks to you, Skip, and to all others who weighed in on my question. Based on the consensus, I'll err on the conservative side and get two sets of 6-ton stands.
                  And the suggestion about the 2x12 lengths underneath is a good one; it reminds me of the cribbing I've seen guys use on those "House Movers" TV shows, where some 70-ton building is supported on a webbing of wood blocks (of course, they're using 6x6s or greater) to support the jacked-up building. Pity there, though; I've never seen a Studebaker truck doing the building-pulling.
                  Mike Auldridge
                  Gaithersburg, MD
                  301-651-4346
                  SDC Life Member since 1976
                  1948 M16
                  1961 Lark VIII convertible (with minor mods)

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                  • #10
                    I think I was leaning toward the 3-ton units at first because: (1) they're cheaper to buy (although so is cut-rate insurance...until you need it); (2) the truck couldn't weigh a huge amount with no bed, and (3) the 3-ton units would take up a smaller footprint on the ground, thus letting me get the floor jack closer to the spot where I'd want the jackstand to be positioned. I wasn't sure if it was acceptable to lift the rear end via the differential, or the front end via the center of the axle, in order to get both stands in place with a single lift. That's assuming the jack would even lift the whole end at once !!
                    Mike Auldridge
                    Gaithersburg, MD
                    301-651-4346
                    SDC Life Member since 1976
                    1948 M16
                    1961 Lark VIII convertible (with minor mods)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I was surprised that my little 1.5 ton Harbor Freight aluminum jack was able to lift my 01 Ford E350 box truck so it's good to know in a pinch. As far as lifting the rear by the center of the diff, why not? That's the spot I've used for the past 60+ years. Ditto for the center of the front axle.
                      59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                      60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                      61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                      62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                      62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                      62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                      63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                      63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                      64 Zip Van
                      66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                      66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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                      • #12
                        Agree with Warren. That's how I jack up my 4E40.
                        Skip Lackie

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                        • #13
                          When I have a car on jack stands, before getting under the car, I grab each corner of the bumpers and shake/wiggle/twist/push/pull the car as hard as I can. That tells me everything is settled into place.
                          RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                          17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                          10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                          10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                          4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                          5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                          56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                          60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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                          • #14
                            Thanks, all, for the jacking confirmation. And if Skip L. is lifting that behemoth of a 4E40 by the rear differential, and it works OK, I have nothing to worry about with this comparatively-light M16.
                            Mike Auldridge
                            Gaithersburg, MD
                            301-651-4346
                            SDC Life Member since 1976
                            1948 M16
                            1961 Lark VIII convertible (with minor mods)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              For your review:

                              http://floorjacked.com/buyers-guide-...t-jack-stands/

                              https://www.garagechief.com/best-jack-stands-review/

                              https://www.autodeets.com/best-jack-stands/

                              http://allgaragefloors.com/best-jack-stands/
                              HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                              Jeff


                              Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                              Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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