Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

3d file makers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • rbigcal
    replied
    Originally posted by Ron Dame View Post
    Wow, that's nice. I wish I could justify the price though.
    I wonder if there are any high school shops that still do sandcasting and possibly even be able to cnc machine one or make a 3d printed one ? High school is where I learned to do sandcasting, but boy was that many moons ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Dame
    replied
    Wow, that's nice. I wish I could justify the price though.

    Leave a comment:


  • rbigcal
    replied
    Update, I sandcasted 2 frames and chose the best to have chromed. Here are some pics of the sandcasting process and a picture of the chromed/painted version. I melted down old mirror frames and misc. chrome pot metal trim pieces to use for casting.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	100_0440.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	85.0 KB
ID:	1720463Click image for larger version

Name:	100_0441.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	66.6 KB
ID:	1720464Click image for larger version

Name:	100_0442.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	66.3 KB
ID:	1720465Click image for larger version

Name:	100_0443.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	85.0 KB
ID:	1720466Click image for larger version

Name:	100_0444.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	89.7 KB
ID:	1720467Click image for larger version

Name:	100_0445.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	92.2 KB
ID:	1720468Click image for larger version

Name:	100_0446.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	71.4 KB
ID:	1720469Click image for larger version

Name:	100_0447.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	83.8 KB
ID:	1720470Click image for larger version

Name:	100_0452.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	97.3 KB
ID:	1720462

    Leave a comment:


  • Bullet
    replied
    That looks very nice. A lot of work, but as you said worth it in the end. I know I would love one of the dealership that my car came from.

    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • rbigcal
    replied
    Ok guys after a crap load of sanding and paint this is what it looks like. I am going to later apply clear urethane over the whole thing, so it will be uv safe. Ran into several problems. For some reason the boxed in area with lettering on top had no top to the box. I had to glue a piece of abs door panel material there and recreate the missing area. I had it printed in black, so clear could be put on, plus be able to sand yellow off the top of the letters. It turned out that the black was just a thin coating over the white material. So after sanding the step lines and sort of textured surface down it revealed white areas. That caused me to have to paint it black and created a problem of cleaning off the yellow, I had to go back and touch up areas where black paint came off. The frame was a little undersized on backside, so plate didn't fit exactly right. I guess overall not too bad for sort of a prototype ! I am going to attempt to use this as a pattern to mold one out of die cast zinc material, then I can have it chromed. After a lot of research I found that you can use a conductive paint on the plastic, then it can be electroplated. I also got some quotes for the spray chrome that is available, $175.00. that's a bit more than I would spend. No matter how its done it is fairly expensive just for a license plate frame. But will be nice on the car.Click image for larger version

Name:	100_0439.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	74.4 KB
ID:	1718075

    Leave a comment:


  • rbigcal
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
    Along with Gary's fine work..

    These guys will make about anything you can conceive of. In various plastic's or other materials.
    https://www.shapeways.com/

    Mike

    That's where Gary had it done.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    Along with Gary's fine work..

    These guys will make about anything you can conceive of. In various plastic's or other materials.
    https://www.shapeways.com/

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Skinnys Garage
    replied
    Originally posted by wittsend View Post
    Interesting. This is the "stock" location (factory drilled holes) of the front plate on my '73 Valiant. Not disputing the information, more scratching my head how they got away with it???
    Your Valiant is missing a bracket that uses the two holes the plate is currently mounted to. Should also be a third hole under the bumper for the angled portion to attach. This bracket will have plate mounting holes that lower it for full view.

    Leave a comment:


  • garyash
    replied
    Remember, the original Torvick frame was for early '60s California "black plates" where the word CALIFORNIA at the top was located below the mounting holes. Later plates were different. Your mileage may vary, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • wittsend
    replied
    Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
    For the record, in the US it is against the law in every state to cover the state name or any part of the license number with a frame or anything else that would interfere with it being read. However, states cannot prohibit covering over any slogan or other material (ie, "Garden State") that the state chooses to put on its license plates. That was the decision of the US Supreme Court in the late 1960s, after a person covered over the legend "World's Fair" on his 1964-65 New York license plates. The court ruled that the purpose of a license plate is vehicle identification, and both the state name and tag number were essential to fulfill that function. But vehicle owners could not be obligated to carry advertising for their state or industry.

    The problem is that some states put their name on the top of the plate, and some on the bottom. So a single "universal" plate frame would have to have thin margins on both the top and bottom -- leaving not a lot of room for readable text.
    Interesting. This is the "stock" location (factory drilled holes) of the front plate on my '73 Valiant. Not disputing the information, more scratching my head how they got away with it???

    My some does 3D printing but typically declines anything I ask for. I've seen "blank" metal plates frames that are engraved with your word of choice.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • garyash
    replied
    Cal wanted to have a license plate frame from the former Torvick Studebaker dealer in Santa Rosa, CA, so here is the result from Shapeways.com. It was made in "Black, strong, and flexible" nylon material. The details came out great and it's pretty smooth. A little light sanding before painting will help make it shine. Black matte plastic is really hard to photograph, but here are some pictures with a Mass. plate. Cal is going to work out the details of how to paint the background of the lettering.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	frame2sm.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	185.9 KB
ID:	1717621Click image for larger version

Name:	frame3sm.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	165.1 KB
ID:	1717622Click image for larger version

Name:	frame4sm.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	171.1 KB
ID:	1717623Click image for larger version

Name:	frame5sm.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	178.7 KB
ID:	1717624

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Dame
    replied
    Originally posted by rbigcal View Post
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]69026[/ATTACH] This is what I want to make, I have had wanted ads on the internet for about a year now. No leads so far
    That looks similar to my Pirotti Motors frame that I'l kike to reproduce.

    Leave a comment:


  • garyash
    replied
    Yes, Dan, the frame could be directly printed in stainless steel (infused with bronze). I've made some small parts this way and the results are very good.

    However, the license plate frame, after I hollowed out the CAD file as much as I dared to occupy 70.3 cubic cm of material, will cost $48.12 in white nylon, $358 in 3D-printed stainless from Shapeways, about as cheap as it can get for 3D printed metal. I think I could take the plastic part to my local art foundry and have them make a wax replica from a silicone rubber mold and investment cast one part in aluminum or aluminum bronze for less than $358. Of course, If anyone needed more than one part, the investment cast copies get cheap in a hurry. Also, if you want to chrome plate the cast parts, that would be extra. A cast aluminum part might buff up nicely but would need to be kept polished to stay shiny. The stainless parts, if buffed well, would look pretty good, but not as bright as chrome or aluminum due to the bronze content. The frame could be CNC machined in aluminum, though the fine detail of the small letters would be challenging, like the inside corners of a K.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michidan
    replied
    Guys I work for 3D systems, the inventors of 3D printing in the 80s. But in the software area so I don't have any printers in my office. There are oodles of plastic printers now, something like 600 different companies making them worldwide.
    I spent a few days with our metal printers this summer and they are WAY more impressive then they used to be. The finished parts are over 99% pure and dense, it's like they are billet. The surface finish isn't that great, but you can do all kinds of post process work to them. Nothing like the compressed metal dust of days past. There any many materials now too, although most are pretty exotic for healthcare applications. Titanium, etc but also varieties of stainless.

    Most of us are not buying a $300K metal printer for the garage, but 3D systems has service bureau for making your parts - https://www.3dsystems.com/on-demand-manufacturing

    Also, not cheap, of course. But if you really want a part, you can get one made no problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • 52 Ragtop
    replied
    StudeRich,
    You mean the ones that Chuck Potter had years ago? I have one on my Avanti. Spent some $$$ getting it rechromed, and I painted it. It looks pretty good! I might have a few of them here somewhere!

    Jim

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X