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  • Don't you wish you had the money...

    ...to put something this beautiful in your garage?

    Who says the industry didn't make elegant cars outside the normal classic period of the 1930s? If this doesn't exude postwar class, I don't know what does. Take a moment to look at the detail photos in this listing, then exhale s-l-o-w-l-y on your way back down to earth. Sigh.... BP

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1948-...em330206079023
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    You are right Bob, one absolutely gorgeous automobile.

    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Editor of "The Down Easterner"
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter
    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

    Comment


    • #3
      You are right Bob, one absolutely gorgeous automobile.

      Joe Roberts
      '61 R1 Champ
      '65 Cruiser
      Editor of "The Down Easterner"
      Eastern North Carolina Chapter
      Joe Roberts
      '61 R1 Champ
      '65 Cruiser
      Eastern North Carolina Chapter

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

        ...to put something this beautiful in your garage?

        Who says the industry didn't make elegant cars outside the normal classic period of the 1930s? If this doesn't exude postwar class, I don't know what does. Take a moment to look at the detail photos in this listing, then exhale s-l-o-w-l-y on your way back down to earth. Sigh.... BP
        Bob, that exterior color must have been rather popular. At a car show here a number of years ago, there were two pregnant elephant Packard converitbles in the exact same color as that one on Ebay!![:0]

        Craig

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

          ...to put something this beautiful in your garage?

          Who says the industry didn't make elegant cars outside the normal classic period of the 1930s? If this doesn't exude postwar class, I don't know what does. Take a moment to look at the detail photos in this listing, then exhale s-l-o-w-l-y on your way back down to earth. Sigh.... BP
          Bob, that exterior color must have been rather popular. At a car show here a number of years ago, there were two pregnant elephant Packard converitbles in the exact same color as that one on Ebay!![:0]

          Craig

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by 8E45E

            quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

            ...to put something this beautiful in your garage?

            Who says the industry didn't make elegant cars outside the normal classic period of the 1930s? If this doesn't exude postwar class, I don't know what does. Take a moment to look at the detail photos in this listing, then exhale s-l-o-w-l-y on your way back down to earth. Sigh.... BP
            Bob, that exterior color must have been rather popular. At a car show here a number of years ago, there were two pregnant elephant Packard convertibles in the exact same color as that one on Ebay!![:0]

            Craig
            Craig: The proportion of 1948 Packard convertibles was actually rather high when compared with total cars produced.

            However, most of the convertibles were the lower-priced Super series with the 5-main-bearing 327 engine. Supers had a 120" wheelbase, and 4,750 copies of the convertible were shipped.

            These Customs had the cream-smooth, nine-main-bearing 356 engine and a longer [127"] wheelbase. But only 1,103 Customs were manufactured. [V]

            Both engines had the same 3 1/2" bore, but the 356 had 4 additional main bearings and a stroke 3/8" longer than the 327. BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by 8E45E

              quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

              ...to put something this beautiful in your garage?

              Who says the industry didn't make elegant cars outside the normal classic period of the 1930s? If this doesn't exude postwar class, I don't know what does. Take a moment to look at the detail photos in this listing, then exhale s-l-o-w-l-y on your way back down to earth. Sigh.... BP
              Bob, that exterior color must have been rather popular. At a car show here a number of years ago, there were two pregnant elephant Packard convertibles in the exact same color as that one on Ebay!![:0]

              Craig
              Craig: The proportion of 1948 Packard convertibles was actually rather high when compared with total cars produced.

              However, most of the convertibles were the lower-priced Super series with the 5-main-bearing 327 engine. Supers had a 120" wheelbase, and 4,750 copies of the convertible were shipped.

              These Customs had the cream-smooth, nine-main-bearing 356 engine and a longer [127"] wheelbase. But only 1,103 Customs were manufactured. [V]

              Both engines had the same 3 1/2" bore, but the 356 had 4 additional main bearings and a stroke 3/8" longer than the 327. BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment


              • #8
                I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s! It's quite a nice car, but the styling does absolutely nothing for me.

                nate

                --
                55 Commander Starlight
                http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                --
                55 Commander Starlight
                http://members.cox.net/njnagel

                Comment


                • #9
                  I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s! It's quite a nice car, but the styling does absolutely nothing for me.

                  nate

                  --
                  55 Commander Starlight
                  http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                  --
                  55 Commander Starlight
                  http://members.cox.net/njnagel

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by N8N

                    I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s!
                    I don't know if I would have wanted to be a Packard dealer in 1955![:0] As nice as the senior line was, it was LATE getting to the dealers, long after the rest of the industry's new car introduction time. They involved a LOT more "dealer prep" to make it presentable, and the dealers had to iron out all the kinks in the new suspension system, Twin-Ultraumatic, and all the other teething problems those cars had.[B)]

                    Craig

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:Originally posted by N8N

                      I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s!
                      I don't know if I would have wanted to be a Packard dealer in 1955![:0] As nice as the senior line was, it was LATE getting to the dealers, long after the rest of the industry's new car introduction time. They involved a LOT more "dealer prep" to make it presentable, and the dealers had to iron out all the kinks in the new suspension system, Twin-Ultraumatic, and all the other teething problems those cars had.[B)]

                      Craig

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by N8N

                        I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s! It's quite a nice car, but the styling does absolutely nothing for me.
                        Same with me Nate. Almost NON styling to me.

                        I DO lust after the model that preceded the 48's however...




                        Dick Steinkamp
                        Bellingham, WA

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by N8N

                          I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s! It's quite a nice car, but the styling does absolutely nothing for me.
                          Same with me Nate. Almost NON styling to me.

                          I DO lust after the model that preceded the 48's however...




                          Dick Steinkamp
                          Bellingham, WA

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes, Dick. Those Clippers are the way to go!
                            "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yes, Dick. Those Clippers are the way to go!
                              "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                              Comment

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