Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What Was Spayed All Over My Firewall?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What Was Spayed All Over My Firewall?

    I know car dealerships used to spray clear lacquer on everything under the hood of used cars, but this doesn't really look like that to me.
    I don't know what it is, but it sure didn't stick well, and I hope a soft brush and some solvent will remove it. Any ideas what this is? Thanks, Tom

    Click image for larger version

Name:	009.JPG
Views:	2
Size:	187.2 KB
ID:	1756181
    Last edited by TWChamp; 11-23-2017, 03:07 PM.

  • #2
    Looks like paint overspray, or maybe that WaxOyl rustproofing?
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Comment


    • #3
      I remember when the engine compartments of used cars were detailed and sprayed with that cheap dressing to shine them up. After a year or two it looked just like your photo. A good engine cleaner should take it off.

      Comment


      • #4
        A dealership that I worked at had a "steam jenny" that was used to clean parts and such.. It had very high pressure and hot steam and would take the paint off.. Looks like a "steam jenny" attack !!

        Comment


        • #5
          Here's a picture of my 1928 Model A firewall showing where I started cleaning 89 years of oil and dirt by using WD-40, diesel fuel, and a soft paintbrush. I hope diesel and WD-40 can work just as well on my 1950 Land Cruiser.

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Terminal Box and Cleaned Paint.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	66.9 KB
ID:	1717324

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Dwain G. View Post
            I remember when the engine compartments of used cars were detailed and sprayed with that cheap dressing to shine them up. After a year or two it looked just like your photo. A good engine cleaner should take it off.
            BINGO! That's the stuff, alright, Dwain. BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Dwain G. View Post
              I remember when the engine compartments of used cars were detailed and sprayed with that cheap dressing to shine them up. After a year or two it looked just like your photo. A good engine cleaner should take it off.
              Yep, that stuff was used to make the entire engine bay look like it had been shellac-ed, hoses and all. But after a few years, this is the aftermath.

              Comment


              • #8
                Always Spay and neuter your Studebakers...
                HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                Jeff


                Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                Comment


                • #9
                  I was changing the butchered voltage regulator today and thought I'd try a few things to remove the crap that someone sprayed all over the firewall. I tried very fine steel wool and polishing compound without much luck. I tried some alcohol without any luck, then tried a screwdriver layed flat and with very light pressure. It will chip away the stuff, but it's very slow. Tomorrow I'll try a plastic credit card. The original black paint is beautiful, and I don't want to scratch or damage it in any way.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	1950 Black Firewall.JPG
Views:	1
Size:	179.6 KB
ID:	1720741

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Does anyone know if lacquer thinner would remove a coating of clear lacquer, but leave the original black enamel untouched?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think lacquer and lacquer thinner will tend to soften and wrinkle enamel, too. The reverse is not true.
                      Skip Lackie

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TWChamp View Post
                        I know car dealerships used to spray clear lacquer on everything under the hood of used cars, but this doesn't really look like that to me.
                        I don't know what it is, but it sure didn't stick well, and I hope a soft brush and some solvent will remove it. Any ideas what this is? Thanks, Tom

                        [ATTACH=CONFIG]68733[/ATTACH]
                        Well...when I first read this, I thought how fortunate you are. For example...once, one of my sisters was at a drive through when her Pacifica was sprayed by a Pelican. (covered the entire car)

                        Then, there was the time I was on an interstate downhill on one of those steep western NC mountains. As I was passing an 18 wheeler, both of us gaining downhill speed, and only then did I discover the risk of being so close to a cattle hauler. Cows don't wait for a "rest stop." I was unceremoniously sprayed at over 70 mph!


                        At least, for your car, you can apply the word "patina."
                        John Clary
                        Greer, SC

                        SDC member since 1975

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
                          I think lacquer and lacquer thinner will tend to soften and wrinkle enamel, too. The reverse is not true.
                          Yes, everything I ever used lacquer thinner on lost all of its paint.
                          "In the heart of Arkansas."
                          Searcy, Arkansas
                          1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                          1952 2R pickup

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Try enamel reducer on a small spot that's not too conspicuous.
                            Dwight 54 Commander hardtop

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Plain ‘ol mineral spirits is likely to do the trick, but of course try a small spot first...
                              1950 Commander Land Cruiser
                              1951 Champion Business Coupe
                              1951 Commander Starlight
                              1952 Champion 2Dr. Sedan
                              1953 Champion Starlight
                              1953 Commander Starliner
                              1953 2R5
                              1956 Golden Hawk Jet Streak
                              1957 Silver Hawk
                              1957 3E5 Pick-Up
                              1959 Silver Hawk
                              1961 Hawk
                              1962 Cruiser 4 speed
                              1963 Daytona Convertible
                              1964 Daytona R2 4 speed
                              1965 Cruiser
                              1970 Avanti

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X