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  • Buttercup's interior

    Got the right rear inside quarter panel cut out today. ABS plastic, .093 in. thick.

    Last edited by Jerry Forrester; 10-10-2017, 08:04 PM.
    Jerry Forrester
    Forrester's Chrome
    Douglasville, Georgia

    See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk


  • #2
    I also installed the right door wind lace. The wind lace came from Rene Harger. It didn't have the extended flap or the bead on it that goes into the groove around the door opening. I talked a local upholstery man (now retired) into sewing on a bead. I was hoping the bead would extend the flap. It didn't. The flap is just barely long enough to reach the tips of the clamping tabs. I said barely, that means it did. I think it will hold okay. Maybe pictures of this tomorrow.
    Jerry Forrester
    Forrester's Chrome
    Douglasville, Georgia

    See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

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    • #3
      That is too bad, when you pay for a Custom made to fit Windlace, you expect to get what you paid for, one that fits correctly without modification.

      "Everyone" knows it takes a 3 Inch attach strip added to the hem of the stock run of the mill Windlace to make it fit ANY Studebaker.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

      Comment


      • #4
        Good start. What did you use to cut the curved areas as I'm getting close to door cards on mine with the same material?

        Bob

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        • #5
          A large pair of tin snips.
          EDIT;
          A change in the process. Use pneumatic shears.


          EDIT;
          To cut the quarter window openings, I used Harbor Freight hole saws. Get the $16.99 kit. It has the 5" saw that's required for the upper rear corner.
          Last edited by Jerry Forrester; 10-13-2017, 01:44 PM.
          Jerry Forrester
          Forrester's Chrome
          Douglasville, Georgia

          See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by sweetolbob View Post
            Good start. What did you use to cut the curved areas as I'm getting close to door cards on mine with the same material?

            Bob
            Originally posted by Jerry Forrester View Post
            A large pair of tin snips.
            My memory is kinda fading about it, but way back in the mid 1970's I owned a kind of econo version of a plain Jane Dodge Demon. Slant 6, AM radio, no air conditioning. Jerry's use of ABS material for panels made me think of the interior of that car. From what I recall, instead of upholstered panels, I think that much of the interior was made of very stiff, molded panels, with the panels textured, but not upholstered, including the headliner. You could scratch the stuff, but it was tough, washable, and no headliner cloth to tear, glue to fail and fall down to the floor! I doubt that this was a feature just for Chrysler economy (cheap) offerings. I expect that AMC and others offered similar textured molded interior items (arm rests, consoles, etc.).

            When cutting the thicker stuff, there are snips that make the job more precise and easy. There are three different configurations that are very helpful. Straight, left, and right curves. If you have arthritic hands, compound leverage snips will make the job much less painful.

            http://www.wisstool.com/snips/compound-action
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

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            • #7
              When cutting a straight section, if you score the ABS a couple good times with a matt knife, it will break in a verry clean line (sorta like cutting sheetrock). You can use 36 grt. (or 40) sandpaper to contour it if necessary.

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              • #8
                Is it possible to cover these with door fabric? Id love to replace my slightly damaged pressboard door cards with this if I can just transfer all the fabric and trimmings to the plastic. I have a feeling it wouldnt quite work that way though.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by creegster View Post
                  Is it possible to cover these with door fabric? Id love to replace my slightly damaged pressboard door cards with this if I can just transfer all the fabric and trimmings to the plastic. I have a feeling it wouldnt quite work that way though.
                  That's exactly what I'm doing with my 74 Avanti. I'll just set the original disintergating pressed board on top of the new ABS sheet and drill all the holes and cut the slots. A good spray adhesive (like 3M 90 or good fabric adhesive) should adhere well to the ABS so why not try it.

                  Bob

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by creegster View Post
                    Is it possible to cover these with door fabric? Id love to replace my slightly damaged pressboard door cards with this if I can just transfer all the fabric and trimmings to the plastic. I have a feeling it wouldnt quite work that way though.
                    Yes. I made all of Leo's interior side panels with this ABS. No sewing involved. Just 3M spray adhesive. Part #08090.





                    For padding I use headliner foam. The type that is glued to the cardboard in the roofs in later model vehicles.
                    Glue the padding to the plastic and the fabric to the foam.
                    Last edited by Jerry Forrester; 12-17-2017, 11:07 AM.
                    Jerry Forrester
                    Forrester's Chrome
                    Douglasville, Georgia

                    See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Got the driver's side wind lace installed today. Like I said the wind lace flap just barely reaches the hold downs.



                      With the wind lace installation behind me I started on the headliner. I've installed only one vinyl headliner before. It's a completely different animal from the cloth headliner I've installed a few times. The vinyl doesn't stretch as easily as the cloth. I need more spring clamps. I'm on my way the Harbor Freight!

                      Last edited by Jerry Forrester; 12-17-2017, 11:08 AM.
                      Jerry Forrester
                      Forrester's Chrome
                      Douglasville, Georgia

                      See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well thats awesome! Thanks guys!

                        I guess I need to find some ABS at a plastics supply place, right? I dont think Home Depot would have this stuff, would they?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by creegster View Post
                          Is it possible to cover these with door fabric? Id love to replace my slightly damaged pressboard door cards with this if I can just transfer all the fabric and trimmings to the plastic. I have a feeling it wouldnt quite work that way though.
                          That's what I did with the passenger door on my 54 wagon. The tricky part was managing the outward curve of the door panel. It caused the upholstery to buckle/wrinkle. It took a couple of tries to get it right. Still looks good after 25 years.
                          RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                          17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                          10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                          10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                          4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                          5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                          56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                          60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
                            That's what I did with the passenger door on my 54 wagon. The tricky part was managing the outward curve of the door panel. It caused the upholstery to buckle/wrinkle. It took a couple of tries to get it right. Still looks good after 25 years.
                            Regarding form fitting where curves are encountered. I wonder if you took the ABS panel, and installed it to its intended place... used a heat gun to give it a "thermal set," and then removed it for upholstering, would make the job much easier???

                            For me, it would involve some practice on a few scrap pieces. I would most likely have to use a hairdrier. I have a couple of heat guns that would probably melt the material, unless handled with skillful care.
                            John Clary
                            Greer, SC

                            SDC member since 1975

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Got the headliner in today. Gonna let it set a few days and then go over it with a heat gun to see if I can relax some of the wrinkles.



                              Got the inside quarter panels cut out and temporarily installed. Also installed the upper parts of the seat belts.



                              Jerry Forrester
                              Forrester's Chrome
                              Douglasville, Georgia

                              See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

                              Comment

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