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Unrestored US6

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  • Unrestored US6

    Someone on the truck forum is redoing a US6, so I took some pictures of this one to help with his restoration. Since these trucks aren't something that most get to see everyday, I thought I'd share it here too.

    This truck was built in June, 1945 and instead of going to war, it went to Macy's in New York City to be put on display as a promotion for war bonds. It has less than 1200 actual miles and is original down to the tires.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/151095...57686906696703


  • #2
    That is an amazing truck! Thanks for sharing with us!
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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    • #3
      That IS amazing how well preserved that 'Ol 6X6 is! That's 72 Years Old, almost as old as I am!
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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      • #4
        What is that bracket with the straps on the passenger side kick panel for? Shovel holder, rifle mount????

        Seems this truck must have suffered from some poor storage over the years, even with only 1200 miles, it has its share of patina.

        Great survivor!

        Jeff in ND

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jeff_H View Post
          What is that bracket with the straps on the passenger side kick panel for? Shovel holder, rifle mount????
          Great survivor!
          Possibly a small fire extinguisher? BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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          • #6
            My first father in law drove a radio truck in Patton's drive toward Berlin. He had a machine gun in a sort of scabbord on the inside of the door so he could grab it and jump out in one smooth movement if they came under attack. I suppose the truck was much like this one. When he and I were around each other it was not on my radar that Stude built so many army trucks so I don't remember ever asking what brand truck it was.
            Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jeff_H View Post
              What is that bracket with the straps on the passenger side kick panel for? Shovel holder, rifle mount????

              Seems this truck must have suffered from some poor storage over the years, even with only 1200 miles, it has its share of patina.

              Great survivor!
              Looks like a fire extinguisher holder.

              Comment


              • #8
                I think the "patina" is more from low quality paint and prep, and less from poor storage. I don't think anyone intended on this truck lasting as long as it has.

                The bracket on the right kick panel is for a fire extinguisher. It's with the truck, but corroded, so no longer mounted in the cab.

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                • #9
                  Awesome truck, Matt.

                  It appears the rims were painted WITH the tires & tubes already mounted!

                  Craig

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                  • #10
                    Can't be..............the fire extinguisher needs to be by the left front tire according to SDC rules.
                    Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                    Possibly a small fire extinguisher? BP
                    sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
                    1950 Champion Convertible
                    1950 Champion 4Dr
                    1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
                    1957 Thunderbird

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                    • #11
                      While doing research in the Studebaker archives back in 1996, I remember seeing a booklet on these trucks. It was an assembly manual for the trucks that were shipped overseas KND. Each truck was in two crates - one for the frame (with wheels, engine on its side, etc) and one with the cab and everything needed within. IIRC, the only thing needed to assemble these trucks was an A-frame and a handful of tools - pretty amazing...

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                      • #12
                        Wow. Just... Wow. What a time capsule. Brings up all kinds of memories. Many thanks for shooting & sharing.

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                        • #13
                          That truck is sooooooo stinkin incredible, I can't believe it. I sure hope nobody touches it. It's in its most pristine original condition. I'm not always a snob about keeping originality, but this one is very special. Perhaps the only one in existence.
                          sals54

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                          • #14
                            Nice three link traction bar, and extra heavy duty sway bar for the performance minded

                            IMG_1675 by Matt Burnette, on Flickr

                            The bottom links are hidden behind the upper one and the left frame rail.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Cool Matt.
                              Thanks for posting the great pics. I have one (not in this condition unfortunately due to being a workhorse in Montana) but the one pic I think everyone would appreciate is of the EXHAUST manifold. Check it out and you'll see what I mean. Remember, these motors were not made by Studebaker, but rather Hercules. Mine is still working for a living as a snowplow in British Columbia mountains.
                              Here is some good information on these wonderful trucks:

                              https://www.militaryfactory.com/armo...p?armor_id=703

                              Cheers, Bill

                              As a PS did you know Studebaker pioneered the use of multiple drive shafts so if they ran over a landmine and blew up a rear axle assembly they still had one more axle propelling the truck.
                              Last edited by Buzzard; 09-20-2017, 09:43 AM. Reason: exrta info

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