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What script font does the Avanti use

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  • What script font does the Avanti use

    I need to have some decals made for the wheel centers on my '63 Avanti. These are not the original wheels, rather they are some spoker alloys off of a Ford LTD. The centers are the Ford Oval shape, and I want to make either a big "S", or the script word "Avanti". Trouble is, I don't know what font is used for the Avanti, and I can't seem to find anything that matches perfectly.

    Any ideas?
    Corley

  • #2
    I'd bet it was a custom made font and probably wasn't even a whole alphabet. Most brands want distinctive, proprietary fonts and pay for them if they can afford it. But I doubt that any more letters than needed to spell Avanti were ever designed.
    "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

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    • #3
      Just take a very high res picture of the script and have some printed. Not too tough in today's digital world.
      sals54

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      • #4
        What "sals54" says.

        my '63 had that font in gold with a black background.
        Kerry. SDC Member #A012596W. ENCSDC member.

        '51 Champion Business Coupe - (Tom's Car). Purchased 11/2012.

        '40 Champion. sold 10/11. '63 Avanti R-1384. sold 12/10.

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        • #5
          I'm not a computer whiz but I don't think there were fonts in 1963.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by doug View Post
            I'm not a computer whiz but I don't think there were fonts in 1963.
            Of course there were fonts, which go as far back as the first printing of the alphabet and numerals, when distinctive styles were adopted. It was probably in the early 20th Century when graphic artists were called upon to design a specific font and copyright it for exclusive use by a company. In the late 1950's Letraset made it easy to copy specific fonts that weren't trademarked with their 'dry transfer' sheets. Then IBM made various typeballs in different fonts as used in their Selectric typewriters starting in the early 1960's.

            As far as the 'Avanti' script with the arrow, it was a specific design by Loewy's own staff, and didn't follow any of the common fonts used back then.

            Craig

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            • #7
              I suppose it's just me, but the Avanti emblems make me think of some of the odd casual font graphics used in TV & Movie credits in the early sixties. Somewhere between the Pink Panther and Jetsons.

              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

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              • #8
                With regard to the two photos above, one of the "S" and one of the word "Avanti" with the arrow through it, I doubt those two are even the same font. Since my space for the decals is only about 3 inches long and 2 inch high, you know, the Ford blue oval, perhaps I should just to the Studebaker red and blue with silver lazy 'S' through it (think Pepsi can on it's side), and not even try to copy the Avanti fonts...???... Might be simpler and more easily recognized...
                Corley

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                • #9
                  Rumor from the AOAI site says the Avanti logo was modeled from the 32 Hupmobile. Just the messenger here. Bob

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jclary View Post
                    I suppose it's just me, but the Avanti emblems make me think of some of the odd casual font graphics used in TV & Movie credits in the early sixties. Somewhere between the Pink Panther and Jetsons.
                    Not that any of us have ever discussed a subject beyond the time and attention it deserves, but the reason I made my comment about Pink Panther & Jetsons, is that it seemed to fit the times. There is a classification of Font, known as "Whimsical." If you look it up, you will find an endless offering of alphabets so classified. In my opinion, the most common characteristic between them is that they seem to be too varied to characterize under one description. The era of "IF it feels good...do it!"..."Beatniks", morphed into "Hippies." It was the age of the Beetles, a whimsical sitcom about a talking horse, and other whimsical freedom of expression attempts from post war baby boomers coming of age. (Perhaps with a little Psychedelic medicinal influence)

                    I believe, while the Hupmobile association can be made(post #9), since they too used an arrow struck through as the horizontal structure of their letter "H," and their chrome script could fall under the whimsical font classification. However, looking at the artwork, it could also fall under the more esteemed art classification known as "Calligraphy." Another form of art as individualized as those who practice it.
                    John Clary
                    Greer, SC

                    SDC member since 1975

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jclary View Post
                      The era of "IF it feels good...do it!"..."Beatniks", morphed into "Hippies." It was the age of the Beetles, a whimsical sitcom about a talking horse, and other whimsical freedom of expression attempts from post war baby boomers coming of age. (Perhaps with a little Psychedelic medicinal influence)
                      That was a popular font called 'Countdown' at the time, which was seen on many posters of the era, often in a variety of contrasting font & background colors. I don't ever recall Studebaker using it in their advertising though.

                      Craig

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                      • #12
                        Yes, different fonts go way back before the computer. Printing presses used blocks with letters carved into them like individual ink stamps. Books, posters, newspapers...all used a variety of different lettering shapes. It probably wasn't until the computer came about that the general public was really aware of what a font was.
                        I would bet that the Frigidaire logo was another "purpose designed" font made to display just their trade name, then a complete alphabet was designed around it later. That font is now called Frigidaire.
                        The Avanti script reminds me of the lettering from the Stardust hotel in Las Vegas....another alphabet style designed to match a "one off" hotel sign. That font is now called stardust. A search of "atomic age" fonts will bring similar looking stuff. FYI, a font called "legendary stardust script" looks a lot like the font used in the opening titles for Bewitched. It's interesting how a simple font style can bring back memories of where it was used.

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                        • #13
                          Raymond Loewy is credited with creating the Avanti logo himself. Whether that's true or his taking credit for it (like he would do that, would he?), will probably never be known.
                          Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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                          • #14
                            It was a custom designed logo. You'd have to recreate it using a vector program like Illustrator to have a print-ready file.

                            Probably someone in our community has already done this

                            Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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                            • #15
                              If it is a font, check with the folks on the Briar Press site, every font that was ever produced will be on that site. Depending on how fussy you are, photo reproductions may be ok or you may hire a graphics artist to redraw one for you. They usually draw them about 2 feet high with as much detail as possible and then photographically reduce the image to the wanted size. Any imperfections are naturally filtered out and you will have a perfect image.

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