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  • New epa paint regulations for 2011

    This has probably already been brought to everyones attention, but I am reposting my take on it to keep it on our minds. In 2011 the epa intends to restrict the sale of all solvent based paints to only certified applicators with certified paint booths in place that will cost upwards of 100,000 dollars. This is an extremely important issue for all of us. Even if you have never or never intend to do an ounce of body or paint work yourself, it is extremely important that we all write and call in to voice our opposition to these new regulations. What do you think is going to happen to the price of a paint job at a body shop when they have cornered the market? It is going to go sky high. I have also heard that the body shop industry is lobbying strongly for these new regulations. It does not surprise me at all, as the EPA is just an organization that serves special interest only and really could not care less about the actual environment. The epa repealed regulations on the auto industry that said that 10 percent of all vehicles produced had to be zero emission vehicles by 2010 I believe, I may have the year wrong, under pressure from the strong auto manufacturers lobby. Tell me, does that sound like an organization that really cares about the environment? Not to mention the amount of particulate matter released by hobbyist painters is so small it can barely be registered in the grand scheme of things. It is extremely important that everyone writes in, two maybe three times to voice their opposition. All you guys out there that feel you are being priced out of the hobby and that it has turned into an elitists game, better get on the ball and write in too. This is your chance to actually be able to do something about the cost of things. What do you think the prices are going to be like when you can't paint yourself and it costs 6,000.00 for just a maco or earl schieb paint job. The epa's website is www.epa.gov Please take a little bit of your time and write just a few words voicing your opposition. This will most definitely not stop with just solvent based paints, it will no doubt eventually extend to water based paints, as they put particulate matter in to the air when sprayed. Not to mention the water based paints are good nowadays, very good in fact, but they are not as good and do not give as good a finish as solvent based. Just like current paints do not give as good of a finish, or hold up as well with uv exposure as lead based paints did. You won't be able to spray your car in the woods if you can't buy any paint for it. It also will not stop with just paint, but will likely extend in the future to include grinding and welding metal, as that releases particles and fumes, and operating or even owning an antique vehicle. Don't let them get their foot in the door.

  • #2
    I have written my Senators and Congressman expressing my objection to the paint ruling. The replies all indicated that this was no longer a legislative issue. The EPA has complete authority to do this without any checks or balances. Something to think about.

    One Senator did compose a letter and include my name and about 10 other hobbyists and send it to the EPA administrator on our behalf. That's all he could do. The administrator replied, but did not commit either way in the response.

    I know we aren't supposed to get political here, but I suggest those of us that vote do so with how the people we vote for look at the old car hobby in mind. Whether the rule is implemented or not in 2011 depends upon what kind of person is in charge of the EPA in 2011. I've done all I can as an individual to stop the nonsense, so whatever happens, happens now.

    Kevin Wolford
    Plymouth, IN

    55 Champion
    60 Lark VI Conv.
    63 Avanti R1

    Comment


    • #3
      I have written my Senators and Congressman expressing my objection to the paint ruling. The replies all indicated that this was no longer a legislative issue. The EPA has complete authority to do this without any checks or balances. Something to think about.

      One Senator did compose a letter and include my name and about 10 other hobbyists and send it to the EPA administrator on our behalf. That's all he could do. The administrator replied, but did not commit either way in the response.

      I know we aren't supposed to get political here, but I suggest those of us that vote do so with how the people we vote for look at the old car hobby in mind. Whether the rule is implemented or not in 2011 depends upon what kind of person is in charge of the EPA in 2011. I've done all I can as an individual to stop the nonsense, so whatever happens, happens now.

      Kevin Wolford
      Plymouth, IN

      55 Champion
      60 Lark VI Conv.
      63 Avanti R1

      Comment


      • #4
        You are very correct[}] This may prove to be tough to overcome, but CAN be done; and you are correct- this is the fight of anyone who will ever need any paint work done on a car- collector or everyday car- which means EVERY ONE OF US.

        We all need to research and learn this subject, and actively stand up against this insanity!

        I'll continue to do whatever I can in this fight; but I am also currently researching paint booths, and will be putting one in my old car shop by then[B)]

        Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
        Parish, central NY 13131


        Comment


        • #5
          You are very correct[}] This may prove to be tough to overcome, but CAN be done; and you are correct- this is the fight of anyone who will ever need any paint work done on a car- collector or everyday car- which means EVERY ONE OF US.

          We all need to research and learn this subject, and actively stand up against this insanity!

          I'll continue to do whatever I can in this fight; but I am also currently researching paint booths, and will be putting one in my old car shop by then[B)]

          Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
          Parish, central NY 13131


          Comment


          • #6
            I believe I have stated this before, but will repeat it. There are many body shops in and around the NY area who do excellent work, and do not have what you or the EPA would call "spray booths". Of those that do, and that I am familiar with, yes, they paint the cars in he booths' if they have them.

            But they do a lot of primer and touch up spraying outside their booths.

            Westchester County in NY State has outlawed the sale of any professional spray paints, but anyone who needs paint can and does takes a 20 min drive to the next county up the road and can purchase all needed paints, solvents and hardeners. Another ramification of this law in Westchester is that all body shops now have their own paint mixing rooms, where they do the color matcing and mixing on site.

            Not to play devilis advocate but putting modern paints in the hands of folks who have no idea how toxic isocyantes are is dangerous. Many of us have learned how to paint, and have taken the proper steps needed to limit or remove any exposure to our neighbors of these chemistries, but what about those who have no sense or reguard for their neigbor or themselves.

            The big issue here is rather than educating the public or hobbyist on the use of these paints, iit is much easier to legislate against them.

            I doubt the paint companies will fight this legislation, which in the long run might prevent them from lawsuits.

            But what would the ramifications be if if someone who built up a tolorance for isocyantes walked past your property and had a reaction to the chemistry? Not only would you be liable for a lawauit, so would the paint manufacturer. The conatiners say for sale only to properly trained professionals.

            However, as with everything that is illegal to sell, I am sure that a supply network of autopaint will still exist even if this legislation is passed.

            Comment


            • #7
              I believe I have stated this before, but will repeat it. There are many body shops in and around the NY area who do excellent work, and do not have what you or the EPA would call "spray booths". Of those that do, and that I am familiar with, yes, they paint the cars in he booths' if they have them.

              But they do a lot of primer and touch up spraying outside their booths.

              Westchester County in NY State has outlawed the sale of any professional spray paints, but anyone who needs paint can and does takes a 20 min drive to the next county up the road and can purchase all needed paints, solvents and hardeners. Another ramification of this law in Westchester is that all body shops now have their own paint mixing rooms, where they do the color matcing and mixing on site.

              Not to play devilis advocate but putting modern paints in the hands of folks who have no idea how toxic isocyantes are is dangerous. Many of us have learned how to paint, and have taken the proper steps needed to limit or remove any exposure to our neighbors of these chemistries, but what about those who have no sense or reguard for their neigbor or themselves.

              The big issue here is rather than educating the public or hobbyist on the use of these paints, iit is much easier to legislate against them.

              I doubt the paint companies will fight this legislation, which in the long run might prevent them from lawsuits.

              But what would the ramifications be if if someone who built up a tolorance for isocyantes walked past your property and had a reaction to the chemistry? Not only would you be liable for a lawauit, so would the paint manufacturer. The conatiners say for sale only to properly trained professionals.

              However, as with everything that is illegal to sell, I am sure that a supply network of autopaint will still exist even if this legislation is passed.

              Comment


              • #8
                Is this the same regulation that was mentioned in the February issue of Hemmings Classic Car, page 6? If so, it refers to EPA-HQ-OAR-2005-0526. If you can get this to open, click on the PDF icon.

                http://www.regulations.gov/search/se...d=117858FCAF63

                If not, search for it on the EPA website (what a nightmare!!) I have been told that this regulation does not apply to hobbyists painting 2 cars or less per year. It may or may not for now. In some jurisdictions, car painting has been illegal for many years.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Is this the same regulation that was mentioned in the February issue of Hemmings Classic Car, page 6? If so, it refers to EPA-HQ-OAR-2005-0526. If you can get this to open, click on the PDF icon.

                  http://www.regulations.gov/search/se...d=117858FCAF63

                  If not, search for it on the EPA website (what a nightmare!!) I have been told that this regulation does not apply to hobbyists painting 2 cars or less per year. It may or may not for now. In some jurisdictions, car painting has been illegal for many years.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You are correct, this is the same regulations that are mentioned in Hemmings Classic car, there are already anti painting laws on the books that could apply to us if the epa feels like enforcing them, the 2011 issue will remove solvent based paint from the shelves, and you will not be able to buy it unless you have certified training and equipment. Thank you for posting the link, that particular link is for the regulations that they just signed in, apparently we can't do anything about that now, but we still need to write in on the 2011 issue and yes, I do agree it is a nightmare to search the epa website.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You are correct, this is the same regulations that are mentioned in Hemmings Classic car, there are already anti painting laws on the books that could apply to us if the epa feels like enforcing them, the 2011 issue will remove solvent based paint from the shelves, and you will not be able to buy it unless you have certified training and equipment. Thank you for posting the link, that particular link is for the regulations that they just signed in, apparently we can't do anything about that now, but we still need to write in on the 2011 issue and yes, I do agree it is a nightmare to search the epa website.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        We shouldn't be surprised about tighter restrictions for solvent based paints. Some of those solvents are down-right nasty. Some are classified as carcogenic and some can give you a splitting head ache in 10 minutes flat.
                        You should see the "Personal Protection" gear we have to use for icocyanide paints here in Oz. Not that I'm complaining, anything that can (or is suspected to) cause cancer deserves a lot of care. It's a learning process. As a young bloke, I (and everybody else) found that nothing cleaned off dirty oil and grease as well as "tri" (tri-chlor-ethylene I think it was called). We washed our hands in it. Seems the stuff is absorbed through the skin somehow, and we can't buy it anymore. Just as well, I think.
                        It's easy to say "we didn't know", but at least we didn't profit by making others use it. We just jeopardised our own health.
                        /H

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          We shouldn't be surprised about tighter restrictions for solvent based paints. Some of those solvents are down-right nasty. Some are classified as carcogenic and some can give you a splitting head ache in 10 minutes flat.
                          You should see the "Personal Protection" gear we have to use for icocyanide paints here in Oz. Not that I'm complaining, anything that can (or is suspected to) cause cancer deserves a lot of care. It's a learning process. As a young bloke, I (and everybody else) found that nothing cleaned off dirty oil and grease as well as "tri" (tri-chlor-ethylene I think it was called). We washed our hands in it. Seems the stuff is absorbed through the skin somehow, and we can't buy it anymore. Just as well, I think.
                          It's easy to say "we didn't know", but at least we didn't profit by making others use it. We just jeopardised our own health.
                          /H

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I am happy to leave the job of handling and applying modern coatings to professionals who are properly equipped to do the job. I realize that it may mean more expense for me when/if I ever repaint my oldies, and I can accept that. The last paint job I bought was well done by a highly-regarded one-man open air shop; but it turned out to be the last whole-car job the painter did. He got sick while working on my truck and after he 'recovered', limited himself to touch-ups before he 'retired' at about age 50.

                            I also expect that as a consequence of these regulations, development of water-based coatings will accelerate-- as it should in any event.




                            51 Commander State Sedan
                            Butler PA

                            51 Commander State Sedan
                            Butler PA

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I am happy to leave the job of handling and applying modern coatings to professionals who are properly equipped to do the job. I realize that it may mean more expense for me when/if I ever repaint my oldies, and I can accept that. The last paint job I bought was well done by a highly-regarded one-man open air shop; but it turned out to be the last whole-car job the painter did. He got sick while working on my truck and after he 'recovered', limited himself to touch-ups before he 'retired' at about age 50.

                              I also expect that as a consequence of these regulations, development of water-based coatings will accelerate-- as it should in any event.




                              51 Commander State Sedan
                              Butler PA

                              51 Commander State Sedan
                              Butler PA

                              Comment

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