Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Who made the engines in Studebakers?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by HOXXOH View Post
    When the Ford vs Studebaker question comes up, I usually mention that Studebaker celebrated their 100th anniversary the year before Ford celebrated their 50th. I follow it up with Lincoln rode to the Ford theater in a Studebaker carriage. That always gets them shaking their heads in disbelief.
    Though the Studebaker Museum has the "Lincoln carriage" it was not built by them.
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

    Comment


    • #17
      At local car show last Friday I think I was able to convince a spectator that no Avantis were ever made in Canada. Also, being able to say that both of my Studebakers have their original engines (232 and 289) always makes my day.
      Tim-'53 Starlight Commander Custom and '63 Avanti in Yuma, AZ
      https://www.jimsrodshop.com/project/53-resurrection https://www.jimsrodshop.com/project/always-ahead

      Comment


      • #18
        Nice to see your post, Bill. Some of us know of your expertise. Your featuring our '53 custom in October, 2011, was a prequel to being featured in January, 2017, issue of Hemmings Motor News.
        Tim-'53 Starlight Commander Custom and '63 Avanti in Yuma, AZ
        https://www.jimsrodshop.com/project/53-resurrection https://www.jimsrodshop.com/project/always-ahead

        Comment


        • #19
          For what it is worth Studebaker built their first 289 c.i. engine in 1913 and it was in production until 1926. Hundreds of thousands were built and many still running.
          Last edited by Studebaker Wheel; 08-22-2017, 12:32 PM.
          Richard Quinn
          Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Indyted View Post
            I read on this forum a couple years back that an Avanti owner took his car to car show. There, he ran into some 'car experts' who where 100% adamant that the 289's in Avantis were the Ford 289. I really want to run into people like that so I can laugh in their faces.

            Seriously, there is one sure way to silence all this Ford 289 talk. The Ford 289 was introduced in April 1963. By the end March 1963, 2,979 or 64% of all Studebaker Avantis were already built. How could almost 3,000 Avantis, be equipped with an Ford engine that had not been developed yet? Furthermore, why would Ford immediately sell its newly developed next generation engine to one of its competitors??
            I have run into these spectators, and I don't even own a Studebaker -

            But, I have tried to educate them -

            To no avail - I have also gotten the story that Chevy bought the design rights to the "new" Studebaker truck - and introduced it as their "new" 1967 Chevrolet C-10 design. To that pile of BS I just shake my head, and walk away...

            Comment


            • #21
              #20, who could ever think they were look-a-likes...?
              Click image for larger version

Name:	stude.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	47.0 KB
ID:	1716011Click image for larger version

Name:	67chevy.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	56.2 KB
ID:	1716012
              sigpic

              Josephine
              -55
              Champion V8
              4d sedan

              Comment


              • #22
                If you were to tally the various makes of engines powering the remaining Studebakers on the road, there are probably more GM powered Studebakers than anything else. I prefer to stick with Studebaker power, it makes my Studebakers even more unique!
                sigpic
                In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
                  Though the Studebaker Museum has the "Lincoln carriage" it was not built by them.
                  Oops, that's what I get for assuming. I just researched that and found it to be made by the Wood Brothers of NY. Thanks for the correction.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by jclary View Post
                    If you really want to puzzle the "self appointed know it all's" ...after setting them straight about the Studebaker 289...follow that up with..."YOU DO KNOW THAT STUDEBAKER HAD BEEN MANUFACTURING VEHICLES FOR A HALF CENTURY BEFORE FORD BECAME A CORPORATION ?!?!

                    Then watch the reactions, disbelief, bewilderment, vacant look, as they wander away from the crazy Studebaker guy.

                    As long as you use the word "vehicle," and not "automobile, or car," you are technically correct!
                    The Ford Motor Company was always a "corporation". The firm was founded in 1903, issued stock (the Dodge brothers held 10%), had a president and various officers. The difference, though, is that the original Ford Motor Company was organized as a private corporation - it could issue stock, but could not trade it on the stock market and there were restrictions on how a private corporation could sell its stock or look for buyers. In most states and provinces there was a maximum number of stockholders a private corporation could have.

                    The Dodge brothers 10% was worth $10,000 in 1903. In the summer of 1919 Henry Ford decided to buy out all the non-Ford family stockholders. The Dodge brothers shares were now worth $12,500 each and the brothers received $25 million for their 10%.

                    In 1956 the Ford Motor Company was reorganized and became a public corporation - it could now trade its stock on the market and there were no restrictions as to the number of stockholders it had.
                    Bill
                    Vancouver, BC

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
                      For what it is worth Studebaker built their first 289 c.i. engine in 1913 and it was in production until 1926. Hundreds of thousands were built and many still running.
                      Very interesting Richard .. Were these 6 cylinder engines ? That many were built ? Hundreds of thousands ?
                      What are the particulars on this engine ?
                      Love my Lark

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Chrycoman View Post
                        The Ford Motor Company was always a "corporation". The firm was founded in 1903, issued stock (the Dodge brothers held 10%), had a president and various officers. The difference, though, is that the original Ford Motor Company was organized as a private corporation - it could issue stock, but could not trade it on the stock market and there were restrictions on how a private corporation could sell its stock or look for buyers. In most states and provinces there was a maximum number of stockholders a private corporation could have.

                        The Dodge brothers 10% was worth $10,000 in 1903. In the summer of 1919 Henry Ford decided to buy out all the non-Ford family stockholders. The Dodge brothers shares were now worth $12,500 each and the brothers received $25 million for their 10%.

                        In 1956 the Ford Motor Company was reorganized and became a public corporation - it could now trade its stock on the market and there were no restrictions as to the number of stockholders it had.
                        Interesting information, but Studebaker still made vehicles more than half a Century (50 years) before that 1903 Ford date.
                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Jett289 View Post
                          I remember many years ago stopping at a car museum in Virden Manitoba and on display there is an early 1900's Chevrolet v8 engine car . It had a brief right up on it and said it was an original car .. I have driven by that museum many times since and will have to revisit again for sure .
                          The first Chevrolet V8 was 1917. I posted pictures of a 1918 here: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...5-1918-Chev-V8

                          Craig

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Thanks craig some fantastic pics there .
                            Love my Lark

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              What? "The Dodge brothers shares were now worth $12,500 each and the brothers received $25 million for their 10%." In 1919 - I need to sit down for a while and take that in.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by WayneXG95 View Post
                                What? "The Dodge brothers shares were now worth $12,500 each and the brothers received $25 million for their 10%." In 1919 - I need to sit down for a while and take that in.
                                Google Dodge vs Ford 1919. Henry had a ton of cash and wanted total control. The method he used forced other investors to sell or lose it.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X