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  • JB Weld

    Is cured JB Weld 100% gasoline proof?

  • #2
    There are more than one JB Weld formulation. I'm not where I can check, but I believe I have a couple of the different packages. Also, there are offerings that cure faster or slower when catalyzed. Perhaps you could pull up their website and learn what would be best for what you have in mind.

    So...after typing the above paragraph, I went to their website in which they claim for gasoline applications, to use "Water Weld," or the "Steel Stick" products.

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/04...g?v=1419965253
    Last edited by jclary; 05-04-2017, 04:29 PM.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #3
      Google is your friend. Since you have an internet connection, 15 seconds on Google would have gotten you this: "When fully cured, J-B Weld is completely resistant to water, gasoline, and about every other petroleum product or automotive chemical. For wet-surface or submerged water or gasoline repairs, try our SteelStik or WaterWeld."
      Paul
      Winston-Salem, NC
      Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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      • #4
        Friend of mine cracked his hemi engine drag racing (legal sanctioned track; not outlaw ). Put it back together with JB Weld, machined it, ran several more seasons and finally sold the engine to an up-and-comer.
        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
        sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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        • #5
          I've repaired 5 or 6 gas tanks over the years with J-B Weld and have never had one leak. I repaired the tank in my 33 Ford
          6 years ago and no problems yet. I've only repaired pin holes with it though, no large holes.

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          • #6
            The reason I ask, is because I have to put my gas tank sending unit back together, after repairing it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
              The reason I ask, is because I have to put my gas tank sending unit back together, after repairing it.
              Now I'm confused. Are you needing to fill a hole? Or are you only needing to seal your sending unit once it is installed. I would think an appropriate gasket is all that would be needed to reinstall a sending unit.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

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              • #8
                JCLARY - When I took my gas tank out this week, I removed the sending unit. The solder seal on the tube coming out of the unit was broken, and the unit itself was covered with some sort of grunge. I took the sending unit apart and cleaned it, and it works. Now I have to refasten the tube to the unit, and seal the two halves of the unit back together..thus, my question on JB Weld. I have a gasket for the sender to the tank.

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                • #9
                  OK, DeSoto...as Paul Harvey used to say...now I know the "Rest of the story!"
                  John Clary
                  Greer, SC

                  SDC member since 1975

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                  • #10
                    I only use PC-7. I have used it in restoring a steering wheel to fuel tanks. My last project was rebuilding the inside of my pitted calipers on the '63 Avanti. I have found PC-7 to be much better to work with then J-B Weld. And PC-7 goes along ways. My two cents.
                    Jim Kaufman
                    Kearney NE

                    1952 2R10
                    1953 Champion (sold it and still kicking myself)
                    1962 GT Hawk
                    1963 R3984 Avanti R1

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
                      Is cured JB Weld 100% gasoline proof?
                      http://lmgtfy.com/?q=is+jb+weld+gasoline+safe

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                      • #12
                        I have a '73 Pinto I converted to the Turbo 2.3 out of the T-Bird Turbo Coupe. Being the engine is fuel injectioned I needed a return line back to the tank. I drilled and soldered a section of gas line to the sending unit as it was far easier to remove than the whole tank (sender is on the side, not top). Unfortunately the soldering process melted the nylon insulator where the wire connects. I liberally applied JB Weld to both sides and nearly 10 years later I have no leak.
                        '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                        • #13
                          First hand experience -

                          Yes, the normal (slow setting) version of JB Weld IS impervious to gasoline.
                          For at least two years on a daily driver carburetor.

                          Mike

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                          • #14
                            Another product I have used to seal the jet wells in Quadrajet carburetors is: MARINE TEX Probably more available in areas with lots of boating facilities. Just don't breath the fumes while it cures as I'm sure it must have "cancer" written all over it.
                            Bill

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Buzzard View Post
                              Just don't breath the fumes while it cures as I'm sure it must have "cancer" written all over it.
                              Bill
                              Bill

                              That's a bit more of a throwaway line than I think is fair to Marine Tex. It's epoxy resin no more no less. It's not mother's milk but it's a product used safely everyday by the general public.

                              http://www.marinetex.com/media/5373/..._resin_ghs.pdf

                              http://www.marinetex.com/media/5372/...rdener_ghs.pdf

                              Bob
                              , ,

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