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  • #16
    OK Bob, sorry about that. It's just that when I see smoke coming from the curing process I jump to conclusions. Thanks for clearing the air, so to speak.
    Bill

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    • #17
      Well I hope so...

      I searched this topic a couple years ago and the consensus info it it was. My late Dad's 1948 Minneapolis Moline tractor at the farm was having issues and I thought a carb overhaul may help. Unfortunately, a brass fitting for the fuel line broke off flush with the cast iron carb body. To make it worse, tried to use a easy-out to get the broken stump out but succeeded in splitting the cast iron boss for the fitting apart. I am sure replacement parts could be sourced but I wanted to get it back together. I coated the threads of a new fitting with JB weld, then fitted the broken corner back around it. For good measure, I bend a pc of thin sheet metal and made sort of a collar and glued all that over the boss with more JB weld for reinforcement. Let it cure for about 2 weeks. I got the carb back together but the problem remained unsolved so all that for nada. I've not had any time to revisit it. I think the power valve maybe clogged and I did not remove it from the carb during the rebuild since it seemed stuck and I didn't want to snap that brass rod off too.

      For the time I did have some gas in there it seemed to be alright.

      Jeff in ND

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      • #18
        I have not had success using JB weld in contact with gas, but POR 15 has done very well.
        Barry'd in Studes

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        • #19
          Originally posted by TX Rebel View Post
          I have not had success using JB weld in contact with gas, but POR 15 has done very well.
          Another product to be considered is Devcon's titanium putty. Quite pricey but industrial strength.

          In fact I once used a skim coat on a porous oil pan and never had a leak...

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          • #20
            I used it a bit..several times as my 53 tank had split at the right side mount. No luck..even tired the Plumber water version..waste of time. I found a NEW NOS tank from a gent here..and replaced mine, after boil out and repair the old tank still leaked...it still leaked a little.

            Now getting the 1/4 inch leak welded and will sell and otherwise nice tank.

            I use JB Weld a a lot .always great..but not this time..

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            • #21
              Originally posted by parts View Post
              I used it a bit..several times as my 53 tank had split at the right side mount. No luck..even tired the Plumber water version..waste of time. I found a NEW NOS tank from a gent here..and replaced mine, after boil out and repair the old tank still leaked...it still leaked a little.

              Now getting the 1/4 inch leak welded and will sell and otherwise nice tank.

              I use JB Weld a a lot .always great..but not this time..
              Soldering a patch will work just as well as welding and is a whole lot simpler.

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              • #22
                Unfortunately I had a radiator shop I used successfully before on other projects..this time still had seepage at the mount flange after about 100 miles.. The solder split at inside of mount flange and tank,, A clen no rust tank too,,
                They offered 75$ refund..which I put towards a NOS tank $175.00.. I had others soldered..first time I ever had a problem like that..
                I like that nice NOS tank..!
                And after I fix the old..I'll pass it on cheaply to get another Stude back on the road..
                Last edited by parts2; 05-07-2017, 08:06 PM.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by wittsend View Post
                  I have a '73 Pinto I converted to the Turbo 2.3 out of the T-Bird Turbo Coupe. Being the engine is fuel injectioned I needed a return line back to the tank. I drilled and soldered a section of gas line to the sending unit as it was far easier to remove than the whole tank (sender is on the side, not top). Unfortunately the soldering process melted the nylon insulator where the wire connects. I liberally applied JB Weld to both sides and nearly 10 years later I have no leak.
                  I had a similar situation in the mid 1990s with the fuel supply tube, that exits the front, lower corner on Stude tanks. That, "straw" had came loose from the original soldering. I jacked the car up high, so all the gas would run to the low side, then used JB Weld generously to reseal the straw. I left it on the jack for a day or two, to dry thoroughly. It held for 3-4 years, till the gas tank mount hole gave out on the other side, but that's another story.

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