Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1964 Daytona Hardtop Rescue Effort

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by jclary View Post
    Just came in from tinkering, (cobbling, and patching on a craigslist purchased wood chipper), for a late lunch ,checked the forum, and noticed your reply to my post. I hope you don't consider my remarks as a negative attack, but my attempt to convey that I fully understand Paul's motivation.

    As long as I'm responding, in humility... I might as well confess that my best RESTORATION skill could probably be viewed as a "poor patch job" by others more talented than I.
    NO - I did not consider your comments to be negative. I just wanted to explain that I have been on all sides of this repair/restoration business/hobby.
    I have nothing against what Paul or you do. I was just trying to understand. As you both probably know by now, I am a believer in communication, but do not always clearly communicate what I am feeling. I am not as much of a writer as you are.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Comment


    • Gary, definitely I have no problem with your question. It was a direct question, something you wanted to understand better, and I like direct questions. To be honest, my wife has asked me the same question , and I gave her the same answer .
      Paul
      Winston-Salem, NC
      Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

      Comment


      • Paul, I admire your skills and determination. I have the affliction of OCD and at times I drive everyone else crazy with my insistence to do something that most think is nonsense. I don't have the skills to do perfection work, more like Jerry Forrester's "fabricobbler", but I try, try, and try again until frustration gets the better of me. Keep doing what you're doing, many of us love to see things fixed/rebuilt/restored and done as best as can be done. Keep posting pic's and video's too, I for one love them. Bill

        Comment


        • Thank you Bill for the encouraging words. I had never heard (seen) Jerry use the term "fabricobbler" but I love it. I don't do perfect work for sure but do try to push the envelope as far as my skills, and tend to learn a little more of what works (and what doesn't) each time.

          Getting the wheelwell patch welded in today -- in fact, letting the weld-thru primer dry as I write this. Got a little sidetracked yesterday, bought a '95 Jeep Wrangler Rio Grande so spent the day getting the title applied for, registration/tag, and then giving it a good cleaning. Wanted a CJ or a YJ for a long time, and a good friend at church finally got tired of driving this one because pushing the clutch in hurt his bad knee. So, the '93 Grand Cherokee Limited will go on Facebook Marketplace next week sometime.

          A little off the Studebaker subject, but here is the 'new to me' Jeep. The full top will come off today, and the bikini top will be put on:
          Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC05052 resized.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	113.3 KB
ID:	1728928
          Last edited by r1lark; 07-27-2019, 11:26 AM. Reason: add picture
          Paul
          Winston-Salem, NC
          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

          Comment


          • Progress today..............

            Sandblasted some areas on the floor and floor flange where the patch had to be welded, flapper wheeled the rest of the areas, then put some weld-thru primer on:
            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC05053 resized.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	67.6 KB
ID:	1728938

            You can never have too many clamps ands vise grips . Patch clamped in ready to weld:
            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC05054 resized.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	63.3 KB
ID:	1728939

            For some reason using weld thru primer is sometimes hit and miss for me. Had some issues this time on the first couple of plug welds, so started scratching the primer away inside the hole, and that worked better. Some of it may have been welding vertically which seems harder (to me at least) to do clean symmetrical plug welds.

            Anyway, here is the outside welded, welds smoothed, and coated with self-etching primer;
            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC05055 resized.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	75.1 KB
ID:	1728940

            ..........and the inside:
            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC05056 resized.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	65.7 KB
ID:	1728941

            Both sides still need to be seam sealed and then a top coat applied (and undercoating on the outside). But before that, I need to work on the seat belt anchor. The seat belt anchor/nut plate on the outside didn't seem to be flat against the wheelwell, so I "massaged" it a bit. But that made some corrosion/thin areas noticeable on the wheelwell inside (around the hole for the seatbelt bolt), so this will need to be dealt with. Not sure the best way to do this, maybe cut a thick sheetmetal square the size of the depression on the inside (with a hole drilled in it of course) and weld this onto the wheelwell from the inside. Or, cut out the bad metal and fully butt weld a new piece in, and install a new seat belt anchor made with thick sheetmetal with a nut welded to it. Still thinking on this one.
            Paul
            Winston-Salem, NC
            Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

            Comment


            • Mighty nice done! & yep, seatbelt anchor is​ quite important...
              sigpic

              Josephine
              -55
              Champion V8
              4d sedan

              Comment


              • Paul:
                I got into your 1964 Dayton Hardtop Rescue thread and videos a little late, mainly because I don’t own a ’64 Dayton Hardtop. Finally, after seeing the thread name so often, curiosity got the best of me and I opened it to see what it was all about. That has to be one of the best things I have done on the Forum and I’m finally taking time to say “thank you”.

                I admire your stick-to-it-ness in following through month after month, year after year with the details, photos, and videos of your “Rescue” of the Dayton. Anyone with any Studebaker can benefit from following your thread.

                So far I have 3 note pad pages full of information about supplies, tools and techniques that I have saved from reading/watching your thread. Taking the time to show suppliers and part numbers, manufacturers and part numbers (still waiting for that info on the special crimping tool for rivets you showed in the window vent videos) of special tools used, and the type of lubricants etc. used is a great help to me and I feel pretty sure some others as well. Your videos are good quality. It may just be my computers (or my declining hearing), but I do find the volume of some of your comments sometimes hard to hear but that is by far the exception, not the rule. Your close-ups of the details on your different projects are excellent and much appreciated.

                Thanks for asking, but so far I could not improve on any of the procedures you have used to accomplish the task. I have never learned to run a lathe and do not have a compressor or press in my little workshop, but your unique home made tools have given me some ideas of how I might create something similar that might do the same job. Again, that is helpful.

                As others have said, the more details the better as far as I am concerned. Like you, I like doing a job, seen or unseen when finished, the best I can. I get a lot of satisfaction in standing back and looking at the finished job cleaned, painted, and the best that I know how to do. Unlike you, I have not had the self-discipline not take the shortest way when I sometimes run into a problem. I particularly admire the way you decided to pull the engine when you broke off an exhaust stud. That was the absolute correct and best decision. I would have spent untold hours trying to get it done any other way than pull the engine. I will try to remember and learn from your example in the future.

                I’m an old hot rod nut from the ‘50s & ‘60s and restored Model A Fords in the ‘70s but sold out by the ‘80s. I had not done any wrenching after that until about 10 years ago when I got into the Studebaker upgrade. I have been amazed at the quality of the fellowship in the Studebaker hobby. The willingness to share and be helpful is outstanding. Your tread is a prime example of that fellowship.

                My Dayton is a 1964 Wagonaire. Sadly, I suffer from the almost terminal disease of “while I’m at it I might as well . . .” which makes mission creep go out of sight. Five years ago I took the seats and carpet out of my Wagonaire in order to put some Hushmat and sound deadener on the floorboards to try to make it both cooler and less like riding in a tin can while running down the hot 130 degrees plus highways here in Texas during our 100 degree days. Now, five years later, I have finally finished installing new saeals on the sliding top of the Wagonaire but haven’t gotten it back in the car yet. As a result it still has not been driven in all that time.

                Granted, unexpected work demands have taken a toll on the number of hours available to work on the project during those five years, but having started on a two or three week project on floorboards and having worked my way up to the sliding roof is really rather excessive mission creep! Hopefully I will finish that project sometime in the next year. I have to say that watching your thread has made me want to go back and do some work on the Wagonaire I did not have in my plan. I that is a good thing but adds to the mission creep!

                All of that just to say, again, Thank You for taking the time and trouble to carry those of us less talented along on your journey.
                Nick

                Comment


                • Nick, thank you for the very kind words. It makes the time doing the videos and posting updates worthwhile when it is a help to other Studebaker folks. The feedback is much appreciated! Some of this is being figured out and fine tuned as I go, so posting the info of what works and doesn't work for me is meant to help others with their projects.

                  Thought the link for the rivet squeezers was in one of the video descriptions, but here is the online address to the Spruce Aircraft Specialty Co rivet squeezers (technically 'rivet setting tools'): https://www.aircraftspruce.com/menus...squeezers.html You can also search online for less expensive semi-tubular rivet setters that require the use of a hammer. Some of the suppliers of vintage trucks (like '40 thru '54 Chevy trucks) may have these. Others folks have used vice grips and a small ball bearing to set these rivets, but I have not tried this.

                  Thanks for the feedback on the video volume. I am naturally a fairly loud talker, but have been trying to tone it down on the videos. I'll tone it down less in the future. I have video for several more videos but have not had time to put them together, including finishing up the vent window series.

                  Also am obviously behind on posting updates on this thread. In fact, I just logged on to make an update (actually have enough for several updates) and saw your post. However, I forgot the forum is going down for updates so will wait until early next week to add some updates. A lot has been done since the last update. And tomorrow comes another big step in the progress, pulling the front drivers side fender to repair some (hopefully small) amount of rust in the very bottom of the cowl post just below the lower fender bolt, and replace a section of the drivers side floorboard. This will complete the rust repairs, and will be time to get started on paint prep.

                  Found your comment about being a hot rod nut in the '50s/'60s interesting, I was too in the late '60s thru the early '80s. In fact, I still have the '23 model T roadster I started building at age 14. Being the anal-type that I am, it has been thru more revamps than miles driven. And one of my bucket list items is a '30 or '31 Model A coupe..............

                  Scope creep, very familiar with that, all my projects suffer from that. Another result of my Type A (as in anal) personality. The last couple of years has resulted in more work on the various Studebaker projects due to retirement in early 2015.......but getting into consulting work after about 9 months of retirement has put a damper on that some. But, I've decided to pretty much get out of that come spring of next year so Studebaker work should pick up.

                  Again, thank you for the nice comments and providing feedback. It gives me a needed boost the night before starting another big job on the car! Look for more updates when the forum is back online early next week.
                  Paul
                  Winston-Salem, NC
                  Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

                  Comment


                  • So.......a long overdue video on installing the vent window weatherstrip.

                    Here is the link: https://youtu.be/BBQIT74jnAI

                    As always, comments and suggestions for improvement are very welcome!

                    Click image for larger version

Name:	maxresdefault.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	85.8 KB
ID:	1729611
                    Paul
                    Winston-Salem, NC
                    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

                    Comment


                    • Sorry for the long delay in updating. A lot has been done, so there is enough for more than several updates.

                      Decided it would be easier to paint the new inner rear quarter panel before installing it. Maybe, maybe not, but that’s what I did. After considering several various coatings, finally settled on a coating that has worked very well for me over the years – Rustoleum Rusty Metal Primer and Rustoleum Professional black paint. And – horrors – it was brushed on! That allowed getting it into all the little corners, and putting on a thicker coat of each. The NOS inner r/q had a little surface rust on one side (must have sat near a roof leak in the old Newman-Altman/Standard Surplus building) so this was cleaned off, the whole r/q scuffed with a scotchbrite pad, cleaned with wax/grease remover, and tacked off. Came out ok, and is well protected. The places that will overlap were taped off and will get weld-thru primer before welding.

                      Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05059 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	70.3 KB ID:	1802977
                      The r/q panel was welded in using the plug weld method. For some reason, I forgot to take pics of the welds before priming them. But here are a few pics of the panel after cleaning/priming the welded areas.
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05063 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	95.9 KB ID:	1802978

                      The foot at the door latch post was both plug welded thru the factory holes, and skip welded on the outer edge. It won’t be going anywhere:
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05066 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	62.9 KB ID:	1802979


                      Also, the seat belt anchor area was reinforced with a piece of metal welded fully on the interior side:
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05067 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	52.4 KB ID:	1802980

                      All welded seams were seam-sealed. I used a brush-on seam sealer for most of the areas, using a small acid brush to apply:
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05083 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	85.2 KB ID:	1802982Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05084 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	63.0 KB ID:	1802983
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05085 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	62.0 KB ID:	1802984
                      The wider/deeper seam got seam sealer from a caulk gun-type tube:
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05082 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	81.6 KB ID:	1802992
                      Since none of these areas will be seen, the seam sealer isn’t applied in perfect straight lines using masking tape…….but honestly is still better than the really messy application done in South Bend!
                      After the seam sealer dried, the primed/sealed areas were painted with Rustoleum Professional black paint. Again, going for protection since these areas won’t be seen. Eventually the whole floorboard will get the Rustoleum treatment before the heat/sound insulation is installed.
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05090 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	95.9 KB ID:	1802985
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05092 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	74.3 KB ID:	1802986
                      Before the outer r/q panel is put back on, I'll pressure wash the rest of the inner r/q and put some fresh undercoating on it. May also paint the exposed portion of the frame with POR-15.....will have to see on that one.

                      Too bad the new forum update still won't let us use more than 10 pics per post.
                      Last edited by r1lark; 09-19-2019, 06:58 PM.
                      Paul
                      Winston-Salem, NC
                      Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

                      Comment


                      • Nice work!
                        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                        Jeff


                        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                        Comment


                        • Thanks Jeff!

                          Look for another update tonight..........I'm way.behind on posting them. ​​​​​​​

                          EDIT: OK, probably Saturday night <sigh>.
                          Last edited by r1lark; 09-21-2019, 05:04 AM.
                          Paul
                          Winston-Salem, NC
                          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

                          Comment


                          • Paul,

                            I am highly impressed with your overall work on this project. I had not looked at the post in the past, (which I regret). Up until a year ago it has been all 53 - 61 "C" body for me. But then I fell in love with the '63 -'66 Daytona body. I bought a '65 Daytona that is really crusty but may be worth saving. I have cut apart and salvaged body parts on the C/K but am not that familiar with the deconstruction of the Daytona. Tonight I scrolled through your entire post and gained some insight on the construction. I will continue to monitor. I attached a shot of the car that inspired me to buy one. Keep up the good work. (Note, this is not my car)

                            JK


                            Click image for larger version  Name:	daytona-1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	129.5 KB ID:	1803278
                            Last edited by 3x2stude; 09-20-2019, 09:36 PM.

                            Comment


                            • Thank you Jon. I've been following your projects also, here and on the Racing Studebaker forum, and enjoy them immensely. Your work on the intake adapter plates has been great........I'm still debating whether to get a set, even though I don't have a project in mind to use them on. With my luck, I'll procrastinate then want a set and they will be all gone.
                              Paul
                              Winston-Salem, NC
                              Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

                              Comment


                              • Another update from the backlog............and I have no idea why the font size keeps changing in the middle of the post.

                                After some consideration, the decision was made to use the existing outer rear quarter panel. It has a few bumps but is rust-free and straight. Actually, the NOS rear quarter might have needed a little more work to fix 55 years of storage dings/dents/tweaks.

                                Rear quarter before beginning:
                                Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05073 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	99.2 KB ID:	1803405

                                The seams (flanges) where the r/q bolts to the car had a good bit of surface rust, so these areas got a lot of attention to remove the rust and protect them. Another area was under the funny little rear overlay used to hide the ‘62/’63 fender shape, there was a lot of surface rust also. Both these areas were flapper wheeled and power wire brushed, then a rust converter was used before priming with Rustoleum Professional Auto Primer and then top coated with Rustoleum Professional black paint.

                                Rear seams/flanges have been wire brushed and Rust Converter applied; the top flange has only been cleaned:
                                Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05077 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	71.3 KB ID:	1803406
                                I wanted to make sure the inside of the rear quarter was well protected, so all the undercoating was stripped off , metal cleaned, and primed with Rustoleum Rusty Metal Primer. There was not much rust remaining, but it will keep any rust pores from growing (see above pic).

                                Seam sealer was used on the seams (I had scraped off the factory seam sealer, at least what had not already fallen off), and then everything was painted with Rustoleum Professional black paint:
                                Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05081 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	74.4 KB ID:	1803407
                                Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05096 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	76.0 KB ID:	1803408
                                The inner surface of the r/q still needs to be undercoated before installation.

                                Also removed the drivers side front fender to look closer at the bottom of the drivers side cowl post, and to fix some rust bubbles in the back of the fender. Here is a pic of the fender removal 'in progress'. A lot of stuff has to come off to pull the fender, but it's not hard -- took an hour or less.

                                Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC05097 resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	134.0 KB ID:	1803409
                                Paul
                                Winston-Salem, NC
                                Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X