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Living the dream - teaching kids about Studes

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  • #16
    I made a trade school education (electronics) last until I was 47 years old. When I got laid off after 21 years at one company, (loyal employees be damned) I had to go back to school and get a 4 year degree. It didn't matter what the subject was, no one would even interview me without a 4 year degree minimum.

    But to this day, I still use what I learned in trade school - every day. Trade schools are much more important for many kids than a liberal arts degree.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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    • #17
      I had a conversation with my superintendent today, and it sounds like he's giving me the green light for a full-fledged auto program this fall. Got a lot to plan out, but good things are yet to come!
      '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

      "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

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      • #18
        This demand for a degree has reached nutty levels here in Soviet California. It's even a requirement to have a four-year degree to mow lawns for the City of Redding! I'm ly'in or I'm die'in, honestly!
        Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
        Ron Smith
        Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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        • #19
          Jim I love the concept! I think that it would be great to interject some history of the company, once you get these guys hooked. It's an exciting story about the wagon making family, that survived in the auto industry, while thousands of manufacturers failed, to become the last independent standing.

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          • #20
            Glad you're able to get this started Jim!

            My HS closed the shop program in 1985-1987. It has recently restarted, but ONLY with plastics injection molding and a few other processing type things because one of the local companies (little company called Berkley that does fishing gear) figured out that they need future employees and that gets the kids started for those that may not go on to college.

            I recently spoke with my brother, who is a Truck and Diesel Instructor at NW Iowa Community College about having some engine work done on a pickup we are building. That particular school has eliminated the engine machining program and sold all of its equipment, there is no longer an automotive program, and they only teach a little body work. They do not have enough enrollment to justify maintaining the programs.

            I can kind of understand why, as looking in my area for a QUALIFIED engine machine shop to do work for me, it became nearly impossible for me to find one. Then when I do, the COST for machining my existing engine (in this case a Chevrolet 350) became prohibitive. I was able to purchase a NEW (not reman) engine for this truck that is literally a bolt-in, drop-in replacement for our 1970 (not a Vortec) GMC for only $1415 from a dealership on the east coast with shipping included.

            The NEED for engine machine shops has dramatically reduced, since we have out-sourced to Mexico, China, and others and even the engines have become throw-aways.

            I work in the fabrication and machining industry and the machines that have been designed to replace people and use computer programs to design and machine new equipment can be done with less manual labor and less human error. It's sad that it has occurred this way, but we all "want" lower prices and better availability. That's the way of the future. Other things will come to replace it for the job market as a whole, but those that know how to machine Studebaker Engines are really special.

            Please support your Studebaker Vendors.

            Support your local schools and encourage them to help set up programs like these, but it's still about the funding in order to keep the program going.

            My father used to tell me that the world needs ditch-diggers too. I don't think we do these days. We have very large earth-moving equipment that can be auto-driven by GPS to carve out the proper landscape...........
            Dis-Use on a Car is Worse Than Mis-Use...
            1959 Studebaker Lark VIII 2DHTP

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
              Jim I love the concept! I think that it would be great to interject some history of the company, once you get these guys hooked. It's an exciting story about the wagon making family, that survived in the auto industry, while thousands of manufacturers failed, to become the last independent standing.
              It wasn't so much that the other builders failed as much as they just saw the writing on the wall, as it were, and many just retired. A lot of companies went into making other things, like semi-truck bodies, ambulances, and custom car bodies (think Fisher). Some went on to make appliances. Mc Laughlin of Canada became part of GM and basically became Chevrolet. Morgan And Company of London became an aircraft and machine-gun manufacturer. A blacksmith named Houghton made sulkies for the Standardbred racing and his company continues to this day.
              Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
              K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
              Ron Smith
              Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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