Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

"Factory" truck grain box?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • "Factory" truck grain box?

    I've been occasionally browsing some farm auctions of late, sort of looking for a older small grain seeder/drill as I may need to DIY plant cover grass strips along ditches on the farm next year due to the recently passed "buffer law" in MN. Dad sold the one he had at his retirement auction in 1998. Hopefully I can get someone hired to do this. I don't think the renter has one as hardly anyone around there plants small grains anymore or hay. No need to get into politics over these buffers!!!!

    Any rate, found this auction with a '55 Studebaker grain truck on it:

    http://www.midwestauctions.com/mages/mages_april_4.htm

    Note the lettering "STUDEBAKER" along the top front of the grain box on this truck. Looks like that box is setup for a roll tarp too. Is that a factory box or did someone add that lettering?

    I doubt they get much for that truck. Too old and small for use on a modern farm in those parts nowadays. Looks like all the farm machinery being sold there is at least 30-35yrs old and small by today's standards.

    Jeff in ND

  • #2
    Same color as my '55 E-38 which has a twin cylinder hoist under the grain bed. I think someone lettered that up.

    Check with your local extension office to see if they rent drills, they do here.
    Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

    The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

    �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

    For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

    "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

    Comment


    • #3
      Agree with Gary -- somebody added it (but it does look nice). Stude did offer "factory" flat bed bodies with their larger trucks, but they were actually built by Edwards Iron Works. I don't recall a grain box being offered as a factory option, and in any case, the Edwards/factory bodies did not carry the Studebaker name.

      Still, that's a nice truck, and would look good on your farm.
      Skip Lackie

      Comment


      • #4
        Depends who is at the auction.A similar truck sold at another Minnesota auction last Fall and had spirited bidding up to the sold price of $2700.00
        Whether that is cheap or not depends solely on ones definition of "not much"
        Mono mind in a stereo world

        Comment


        • #5
          A similar truck sold at another Minnesota auction last Fall and had spirited bidding up to the sold price of $2700.00
          Bob, that is a surprise. This one looks like its probably in nice original shape so maybe it goes to a good home and not for yard art someplace or scrap. At one time there were a lot of those 50's era single axle grain trucks around with a 2-300 bushel box on them. Now even the twin axle trucks with 500 bushel boxes are not in any demand by active farms. I think those get converted to hauling water tanks for re-supply of sprayers a lot. Semi-tractor-trailers are what most use now. I recall similar old trucks getting like $400 at auctions 15-20yrs ago.

          My dad had similar to a bit smaller sized equipment that this auction has. Our farm was right next to town so there was never a grain truck as it was close enough to use wagons/tractor to haul to the grain elevator. That elevator facility is now vacant for the past 5 or so years so I think farmers in that area use their semi's to haul at least 12miles or more. Most of the farms have a "bin site" someplace if not on the main building site so they can store & dry their own grain for later sale. The elevator was not on a rail line and the owners sold the property a few years ago as it was not profitable anymore given the hauling cost to use trucks. Some outfit out of Nebraska (I think) bought it for peanuts and its been sitting vacant since.

          Jeff in ND

          Comment


          • #6
            My Dad had a '52 Stude. 2R16A Grainbed H.D. Truck that a friend, Mr. Asa Shaw brought to Calif. from his father's Farm in Missouri. It had a very well made Knapheide Body on it and I have seen a lot of Studes. with those.
            Still around since 1848 in Quincy, Illinois!

            I do not know if Studebaker ever sent any Trucks there for installation of these very high quality beds for resale or not.

            https://www.knapheide.com/about-us/history
            Last edited by StudeRich; 03-07-2017, 04:52 PM.
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jeff_H View Post
              Bob, that is a surprise. This one looks like its probably in nice original shape so maybe it goes to a good home and not for yard art someplace or scrap. At one time there were a lot of those 50's era single axle grain trucks around with a 2-300 bushel box on them. Now even the twin axle trucks with 500 bushel boxes are not in any demand by active farms. I think those get converted to hauling water tanks for re-supply of sprayers a lot. Semi-tractor-trailers are what most use now. I recall similar old trucks getting like $400 at auctions 15-20yrs ago.

              My dad had similar to a bit smaller sized equipment that this auction has. Our farm was right next to town so there was never a grain truck as it was close enough to use wagons/tractor to haul to the grain elevator. That elevator facility is now vacant for the past 5 or so years so I think farmers in that area use their semi's to haul at least 12miles or more. Most of the farms have a "bin site" someplace if not on the main building site so they can store & dry their own grain for later sale. The elevator was not on a rail line and the owners sold the property a few years ago as it was not profitable anymore given the hauling cost to use trucks. Some outfit out of Nebraska (I think) bought it for peanuts and its been sitting vacant since.
              A pair of dedicated Studebaker enthusiasts met at the auction.One wanted it because it was just like the one he grew up with on the family farm.
              The other bidder was the son of the owner who wanted it because it was the truck he grew up with on the family farm.
              Mono mind in a stereo world

              Comment


              • #8
                Nice looking truck for sure. Would be nice for someone with a hobby farm and some vintage farming equipment. This red truck would look good parked next to Jeff's red Belarus tractor
                sigpic
                In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Somewhere I think I have a state-by-state list of Studebaker approved truck body suppliers, but no luck finding it now.
                  Growing up in SW Missouri, I remember some farmers switching boxes for whatever purpose the truck was needed for at the time. It might have an insulated box for hauling milk cans to the MFA plant, then get changed out for a grain box to haul wheat to the elevator. This was back in the days when the truck would run alongside the combine until the box was full, then peel off and head for the elevator in town to unload.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X