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  • #31
    Well...while we have completely swerved this thread away from the original topic of most powerful six cylinder Studebaker engine, and what were early "rodders" doing to boost their performance...

    ...now, to discussing "durability" of the old cast iron beasts...I seem to recall (always suspect) comments either printed (turning wheels?) or posted here on the forum, a report about how the Studebaker engines compared in durability to competitive products during a wartime study. My suspect memory recalls that the study was conducted for the purpose of evaluating engines to be chosen for military applications. My understanding is that the engineer tasked with the study, (I don't recall the name) was actually an employee of General Motors. The conclusion was that the Studebaker flathead six was the toughest of the bunch.

    Since I know the source I read was "one of us," could be that this story might just be biased bravado, but interesting none the less. Anyone have a better grasp of this than me? Am I conflating this story with the one discussed above? I kinda stumbled into the Studebaker world by happenstance in 1975 when I found a bargain used pickup for sale in a yard. I bought it 'cause it was "different" & cheap. Only as the years have piled up, have I developed and refined a deep appreciation and respect for a history some of you grew up around.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #32
      Here is a link to an interesting history of the use of superchargers on early hot rods, race cars, and production cars:
      http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/eng...sc-principles/

      Here is some history of the McCulloch/Paxton/Novi blowers (Studebaker content!):
      http://vs57.y-block.info/history.htm

      For some wild flathead engines, including Hudsons and early Ford V8's, see Uncommon Engineering:
      http://www.uncommonengineering.com/
      I called the Uncommon Engineering phone once and had a chat about how to really boost the 1937 President straight 8 (250 cu in) that I'll be using in my Indy car replica. He had lots of ideas. We were soon in the stratosphere of a $20,000 engine build. Yeah, it would be an interesting project, but didn't fit my budget. But, based on the comments of Stewdi in his post #29 above, it looks like I can put my redline up to 4500 rpm without problems. That should give me about 125 mph with a 3.31 rear and 7.00-18 tires!
      Last edited by garyash; 03-07-2017, 04:36 PM.
      Gary Ash
      Dartmouth, Mass.

      '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
      ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
      '48 M5
      '65 Wagonaire Commander
      '63 Wagonaire Standard
      web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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      • #33
        John, your "suspect memory" recalls very well. The WWll engine evaluation story was not apocryphal, but was submitted to Turning Wheels in "Letters to the Editor" a LONG time ago - maybe 20 years - by a member of a family which bought and loved Studebakers, and lived across the street from the GM engineer who told them the story. l was very much taken with the story and have repeated it a couple of times, including on the forum. Glad you remembered it. l think the engine in the engineer's telling was the Champion six.

        Gary, l'm just repeating what was in the article. If she blows at 4499rpm, don't point at me!
        Roger Hill


        60 Lark Vlll, hardtop, black/red, Power Kit, 3 spd. - "Juliette"
        61 Champ Deluxe, 6, black/red, o/d, long box. - "Jeri"
        Junior Wagon - "Junior"

        "In the end, dear undertaker,
        Ride me in a Studebaker"

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        • #34
          jclary,

          So John not to nit pick too much, but since you made an attempt to get people back on track of the original questioner, and rightfully so. How does your last post relate regarding the competitive durability of wartime engines relate to the hotrod issue?

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          • #35
            Maybe we can also speculate also what COULD have been built, and how much HP it had.

            Perhaps BP and his cousin can tell us about a certain OHV six cylinder they saw while peeking through the windows of the Engineering Building in 1963!!!

            Craig

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
              jclary,

              So John not to nit pick too much, but since you made an attempt to get people back on track of the original questioner, and rightfully so. How does your last post relate regarding the competitive durability of wartime engines relate to the hotrod issue?
              Absolutely nothing! It was merely because some of the other conversation tickled my memory regarding the wartime engine research study. By the way...I love your forum handle...had to click your profile for a clue...clever.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

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              • #37
                Thanks John, but I really can't take credit for the name. It was pinned on me years ago when I was a kid, can't remember by whom. I just recycled it and now run with it proudly. When I played basketball some just shortened it to "Butt." Anyone who played the game, on whatever level, will get the picture of a BIG part of my game.

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                • #38
                  This thread might have wandered a bit but WOW it has been a very interesting read .. I'm curious on what Craig has touched upon now !!??


                  Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
                  Maybe we can also speculate also what COULD have been built, and how much HP it had.

                  Perhaps BP and his cousin can tell us about a certain OHV six cylinder they saw while peeking through the windows of the Engineering Building in 1963!!!

                  Craig
                  Love my Lark

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Jett289 View Post
                    This thread might have wandered a bit but WOW it has been a very interesting read .. I'm curious on what Craig has touched upon now !!??
                    HINT: September, 1980 Turning Wheels.

                    Craig

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