Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Experience buying and importing Studebaker from Canada

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Experience buying and importing Studebaker from Canada

    Hello, I am looking at buying a Studebaker from north of the border, Canada. May be parts, may be an ambitious restoration. Still gathering details. Any suggestions and shared experiences are appreciated. Visiting Indiana BMV Tuesday to ask what they will want to title the car. Bits I have seen suggest it will be a slow tedious process but with patience not too bad.
    Anyone willing please share your experience. Car would be from a long time enthusiast in Manitoba who is very active in the hobby and downsizing.

    Thanks

    Scott K

  • #2
    About a year and a half ago, I bought a '52 Stude truck from an SDC member in Ontario and had it shipped to Florida. I had to hire a transport company that dealt with bringing cars across the border, and had to hire a customs broker that would coordinate and work with the shipper. All in all it was about a month before the truck showed up in my driveway, and the cost (with enclosed shipping on the same hauler start to finish) was about $2000 to Florida. Well worth it as it was a nice truck. The process wasn't that hard, just pricy.

    I have a friend in Kentucky that drove up to Canada and bought an Avanti and brought it back himself. That saved the customs brokers fees and it didn't take any time at all.

    Every state is different but registration wasn't a problem with all of the paperwork.

    Good luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      I sold my '61 Flamingo Hawk ( show car) to a person in Florida. This person summers in the north and met us at the Canadian side of the border and then accompanied me with the car to US customs. He then completed the paper work for importing the car. There was no problem, however, it happened to be a very convenient and would not happen if the buyer is further away. As Matthew has indicated, you need to go through a broker to have the car imported to the US. It is not difficult but just takes time. Roly Lusted
      sigpic
      Roly Lusted, Past President Hamilton Chapter SDC
      http://www.thehamiltonchaptersdc.ca
      https://www.facebook.com/The-Hamilto...64400/?fref=ts

      Comment


      • #4
        I believe it is now mandatory to use a broker (since about 3 years ago). Even if not mandatory, it is still an excellent practice. After you get the paperwork from the broker, double check to be absolutely certain that all the information on the documents is correct: year and make of vehicle; serial number or VIN; registration province/state and number; full name of the person accompanying the vehicle at the border. A small error can cause an unwelcome delay. With everything done correctly, crossing the border usually is not a problem.
        Bill Jarvis

        Comment


        • #5
          I have brought 3 Studebakers from the US to Canada without any problems what so ever but each time I have I phoned both sides of the border ( Customs ) who were always very helpful and it seemed that each time some rule had changed . So I would recommend you giving your US Custom a call at what ever border crossing you plan on using .
          sigpic

          Home of the Fried Green Tomato

          "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

          1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

          Comment


          • #6
            I did the same thing a couple of years ago. I bought my 62 GT from a guy in Kelowna British Columbia. You have to go through a broker at the border crossing. I think it cost me an extra $250 for that service. Then the hassle of getting a shipper to bring it from Kelowna to central Maryland. That was another $2,300 and took 2 weeks. Would I do it again? Probably not. 20-20 hind sight tells me I should have put more effort into finding a GT closer to home. I do love my GT but that $2,300 would have paid for the seats and carpets to be redone. I had just missed out on a GT in NJ the week before only 75 miles away.
            I'd rather be driving my Studebaker!

            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks to all who have offered feedback. I see i have some added calls to make. I would need to get a passport and follow up on a couple things but i have the truck and trailer to recover the vehicle and get it home. May be best just to pay somone who knows the ins and outs to get into US, at least Minesota, and collect from there.

              Comment


              • #8
                In 2002 a friend and I brought a 1937 President back to Seattle from Vancouver area. At customs the officer glanced out the window at the car on the open trailer. Then he looked back at me, and said lets go out and take a look. I said to myself oh s... as we walked out to the car, what now. He looked the car over, asked no questions, handed me the paperwork and went inside. All he wanted to do was look at the car! Big sigh of relief and we were down the road. That has been my only experience. I still believe that if you do bring the car back yourself, there will not be a problem.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by FleetMaster68 View Post
                  Thanks to all who have offered feedback. I see i have some added calls to make. I would need to get a passport and follow up on a couple things but i have the truck and trailer to recover the vehicle and get it home. May be best just to pay somone who knows the ins and outs to get into US, at least Minesota, and collect from there.
                  If your broker has the paper work in order, and you have your passport in hand, the border should be no problem. You need the broker's services whether you bring the car into the U.S. or have someone else do it.

                  One more important hint, for anyone entering Canada from anywhere for any purpose. I know that many law-abiding Americans like to carry hand guns. In Canada it is illegal to carry hand guns with very rare exceptions. Please do not bring them to Canada.
                  Bill Jarvis

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Roly Lusted View Post
                    I sold my '61 Flamingo Hawk ( show car) to a person in Florida. This person summers in the north and met us at the Canadian side of the border and then accompanied me with the car to US customs. He then completed the paper work for importing the car. There was no problem, however, it happened to be a very convenient and would not happen if the buyer is further away. As Matthew has indicated, you need to go through a broker to have the car imported to the US. It is not difficult but just takes time. Roly Lusted
                    In the fall of 2016, a friend sold a car to a person near Indianapolis from Canada. He did the same thing as I did. He met the buyer on the Canadian side and the man accompanied him with the car, imported it himself and off he went with the car. You don’t have to have a broker, but you do need a passport.
                    sigpic
                    Roly Lusted, Past President Hamilton Chapter SDC
                    http://www.thehamiltonchaptersdc.ca
                    https://www.facebook.com/The-Hamilto...64400/?fref=ts

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      One more important hint, for anyone entering Canada from anywhere for any purpose. I know that many law-abiding Americans like to carry hand guns. In Canada it is illegal to carry hand guns with very rare exceptions. Please do not bring them to Canada.

                      Having numerous Canadian friends, I find it somewhat humorous that so many Canadians believe that all US citizens have at least one gun. I got a chuckle out of the Canadian boarder officer, when we went into Canada last year. The women asked me if I owned a gun, rather then whether I was carrying a gun with me. I responded with a smile, that no I was one of the few Americans that doesn't own a gun. We shared a laugh and we were on our way. Actually only about half of Americans own a gun, but like so much in life, perception is truth.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I wasn't suggesting that all or most Americans carry firearms. Sometimes those who legally and peaceably do so get an unwelcome surprise at the border when they find the laws in another country are different.

                        When there are questions about crossing the border, it is a good idea to telephone in advance to the Canada Border Services Agency or to the United States Customs and Border Protection.

                        Having crossed the Canada/U.S. border many times over many years, plus a couple of trips to Great Britain and one to Mexico, I have always found the officers to be professional and courteous, with only a couple of exceptions.
                        Bill Jarvis

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I took your comment simply to be a friendly reminder that if you do carry a firearm, Canada does not have the same laws allowing personal carry and that may cause you a problem at the boarder. A friendly note of caution.

                          Even within the USA from State to State the rules change, often drastically, and what is fine in "A" is illegal at "B"

                          Again thanks to all who have offerred feedback. I may be sending a PM to a couple of you asking about some added details.

                          Scott K

                          Originally posted by Greenstude View Post
                          I wasn't suggesting that all or most Americans carry firearms. Sometimes those who legally and peaceably do so get an unwelcome surprise at the border when they find the laws in another country are different.

                          When there are questions about crossing the border, it is a good idea to telephone in advance to the Canada Border Services Agency or to the United States Customs and Border Protection.

                          Having crossed the Canada/U.S. border many times over many years, plus a couple of trips to Great Britain and one to Mexico, I have always found the officers to be professional and courteous, with only a couple of exceptions.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X