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  • #16
    Bob is correct and with the current crop of automobiles on the scene since circa 1980, that consumer mentality of CAR AS APPLIANCE is only reinforced by bland design.

    Studedude1961
    --1963 Cruiser

    Comment


    • #17
      Bob is correct and with the current crop of automobiles on the scene since circa 1980, that consumer mentality of CAR AS APPLIANCE is only reinforced by bland design.

      Studedude1961
      --1963 Cruiser

      Comment


      • #18
        I can see both sides to the issue...
        On the one hand we are a "Driver's" club, so what's the point of having a vehicle that you cannot drive for a significant part of the year. As was pointed out to me in another post by Mr. Vines, it is cheaper to make that vintage Studebaker daily "driveworthy" than buying a new machine, plus you get the added joy of driving a Stude.
        On the other hand, you don't want your pride and joy to disintegrate before your eyes, so it would seem prudent to keep it home during the worst weather (except for a Stude 4x4 Truck![]), unless significant steps have been taken to "rust proof" and winterize it.

        I cannot ever see myself taking out my truck during a severe weather event, but if I didn't take it out in the rain (or other inclement weather), it might never leave the garage in this climate![:0]
        Bottom line for me is that I want to enjoy some "quality time" behind the wheel before I meet [u]my</u> demise.[^]

        <h5>Mark
        '57 Transtar
        3E-6/7-122
        </h5>
        [img]
        Mark Hayden
        '66 Commander
        Zone Coordinator
        Pacific Can-Am Zone

        Comment


        • #19
          I can see both sides to the issue...
          On the one hand we are a "Driver's" club, so what's the point of having a vehicle that you cannot drive for a significant part of the year. As was pointed out to me in another post by Mr. Vines, it is cheaper to make that vintage Studebaker daily "driveworthy" than buying a new machine, plus you get the added joy of driving a Stude.
          On the other hand, you don't want your pride and joy to disintegrate before your eyes, so it would seem prudent to keep it home during the worst weather (except for a Stude 4x4 Truck![]), unless significant steps have been taken to "rust proof" and winterize it.

          I cannot ever see myself taking out my truck during a severe weather event, but if I didn't take it out in the rain (or other inclement weather), it might never leave the garage in this climate![:0]
          Bottom line for me is that I want to enjoy some "quality time" behind the wheel before I meet [u]my</u> demise.[^]

          <h5>Mark
          '57 Transtar
          3E-6/7-122
          </h5>
          [img]
          Mark Hayden
          '66 Commander
          Zone Coordinator
          Pacific Can-Am Zone

          Comment


          • #20
            Well, Mark; this "Drivers Club" business will never be settled one way or another.

            The problem arose because The Studebaker Drivers Club was formed when the cars were readily in production and being sold new. It made sense to call it a Drivers Club because, in fact, that's what most of its members did on a daily basis. Once they wore out the existing one, an infinite supply of new ones was being cranked out of South Bend and Hamilton to replace those consumed. (They don't call us consumers for nothing, you know!)

            Of course, that dynamic reversed in March 1966: The supply of replacements became finite; no longer infinite. [V]

            So you can take it from there! [8D] BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #21
              Well, Mark; this "Drivers Club" business will never be settled one way or another.

              The problem arose because The Studebaker Drivers Club was formed when the cars were readily in production and being sold new. It made sense to call it a Drivers Club because, in fact, that's what most of its members did on a daily basis. Once they wore out the existing one, an infinite supply of new ones was being cranked out of South Bend and Hamilton to replace those consumed. (They don't call us consumers for nothing, you know!)

              Of course, that dynamic reversed in March 1966: The supply of replacements became finite; no longer infinite. [V]

              So you can take it from there! [8D] BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment


              • #22
                Mr. Pressley, your comments make me think you have a trailer queen for a Studebaker. The Ford owner can do whatever he likes, without consulting you.


                And my first cars were a '58 Ford Ranch Wagon, and a '59 4 door Galaxie 500 with factory air. I drove them in snow, too.

                Chris Pile
                StudeFolk Manager
                http://tiny.cc/RYqAK
                The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

                Comment


                • #23
                  Mr. Pressley, your comments make me think you have a trailer queen for a Studebaker. The Ford owner can do whatever he likes, without consulting you.


                  And my first cars were a '58 Ford Ranch Wagon, and a '59 4 door Galaxie 500 with factory air. I drove them in snow, too.

                  Chris Pile
                  StudeFolk Manager
                  http://tiny.cc/RYqAK
                  The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

                    Well, Mark; this "Drivers Club" business will never be settled one way or another.
                    The problem arose because The Studebaker Drivers Club was formed when the cars were readily in production and being sold new. It made sense to call it a Drivers Club because, in fact, that's what most of its members did on a daily basis. Once they wore out the existing one, an infinite supply of new ones was being cranked out of South Bend and Hamilton to replace those consumed. (They don't call us consumers for nothing, you know!)
                    Of course, that dynamic reversed in March 1966: The supply of replacements became finite; no longer infinite. [V]
                    So you can take it from there! [8D] BP
                    Bob, You have hit the "nail on the head" as it were... To put it crudely, it's trying to find the balance between having a museum piece that you can pass on to your heirs (and hope they are interested) or having a neat piece of history that you can use and share while you are still alive (and if things work well, you both have about the same longevity). I guess I am leaning towards the latter as I enjoy things I can actually use as opposed to just look at.
                    Of course, this has gotten away from the original thread which was about driving a classic in "crappy" weather, but I suppose it is all a matter of degrees.

                    <h5>Mark
                    '57 Transtar
                    3E-6/7-122
                    </h5>
                    [img]
                    Mark Hayden
                    '66 Commander
                    Zone Coordinator
                    Pacific Can-Am Zone

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

                      Well, Mark; this "Drivers Club" business will never be settled one way or another.
                      The problem arose because The Studebaker Drivers Club was formed when the cars were readily in production and being sold new. It made sense to call it a Drivers Club because, in fact, that's what most of its members did on a daily basis. Once they wore out the existing one, an infinite supply of new ones was being cranked out of South Bend and Hamilton to replace those consumed. (They don't call us consumers for nothing, you know!)
                      Of course, that dynamic reversed in March 1966: The supply of replacements became finite; no longer infinite. [V]
                      So you can take it from there! [8D] BP
                      Bob, You have hit the "nail on the head" as it were... To put it crudely, it's trying to find the balance between having a museum piece that you can pass on to your heirs (and hope they are interested) or having a neat piece of history that you can use and share while you are still alive (and if things work well, you both have about the same longevity). I guess I am leaning towards the latter as I enjoy things I can actually use as opposed to just look at.
                      Of course, this has gotten away from the original thread which was about driving a classic in "crappy" weather, but I suppose it is all a matter of degrees.

                      <h5>Mark
                      '57 Transtar
                      3E-6/7-122
                      </h5>
                      [img]
                      Mark Hayden
                      '66 Commander
                      Zone Coordinator
                      Pacific Can-Am Zone

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I like and had good experiences with 1956 and 1957 Fords, but I hate 1958 Fords. This is based on my personal experience (your experience may vary). My father-in-law bought a 1958 Ford new. It was also a black and white four door with a gold spear on the side. He had problems with it from the day that it was delivered. I bought it from him when it was a low mileage, late model used car. I had many small and large problems with it. A few that I remember; blew a head gasket, clutch pedal mechanism came crashing down on my shin while I was driving the car, carb. float sunk stranding my wife. The car looked good. I traded it in on a 1961 Lark VIII Regal sedan that was an excellent car. The Studebaker dealer told me that they liked the car because it generated many service calls for them.

                        I have written on another thread about a local Trooper that inherited his father's 1962 Hawk with 11K miles on it. Many of us tried to buy it to save it. He decided that it was just like getting a new car and drove it everyday. In about two years, it was just a rusty hulk.

                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer
                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I like and had good experiences with 1956 and 1957 Fords, but I hate 1958 Fords. This is based on my personal experience (your experience may vary). My father-in-law bought a 1958 Ford new. It was also a black and white four door with a gold spear on the side. He had problems with it from the day that it was delivered. I bought it from him when it was a low mileage, late model used car. I had many small and large problems with it. A few that I remember; blew a head gasket, clutch pedal mechanism came crashing down on my shin while I was driving the car, carb. float sunk stranding my wife. The car looked good. I traded it in on a 1961 Lark VIII Regal sedan that was an excellent car. The Studebaker dealer told me that they liked the car because it generated many service calls for them.

                          I have written on another thread about a local Trooper that inherited his father's 1962 Hawk with 11K miles on it. Many of us tried to buy it to save it. He decided that it was just like getting a new car and drove it everyday. In about two years, it was just a rusty hulk.

                          Gary L.
                          Wappinger, NY

                          SDC member since 1968
                          Studebaker enthusiast much longer
                          Gary L.
                          Wappinger, NY

                          SDC member since 1968
                          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Chris, I believe anybody can do whatever what they want with their own car, I truly do. I just wonder if the owner actually knows that driving it in Pennsylvania salt will significantly diminish its life...unlike later iron. Does Kansas use salt on its roads? I don't know.

                            Pennsylvania has a required annual State Inspection for automobiles. While I admit that I haven't actually lived there for 27 years, it used to be that a car with visible rust holes would not pass state inspection, making it illegal to operate. You'd have to get the holes fixed. Not sure if it's still that stringent, but back when I lived there, we'd kid that you'd see cars from nearby OH (only 8-10 miles up the road, maybe) with railroad ties for bumpers, no hoods, huge rust holes, and know right away they weren't Pennsylvania cars.

                            My Lark was restored as a fairly nice driver, body-on, and with consideration of cost, but I admit I was fussy about authenticity, at least outside, so the Ermine White is just that, the emblems and nameplates are decent and in the right places, I have NOS seat upholstery inside, etc. But it's most definitely not a trailer queen!

                            Gary, I really don't have any experience with '58 Fords (I was born in '58) but my aunt had a cocoa brown with white cove and top, Fairlane two-door sedan which I always thought looked sharp. The two-door sedan had thin, chromed door frames and posts and resembled a hardtop. I always thought it was neat (no particular reason) that the hood opened in a reverse manner from most other cars. Chris, I'd have liked that '58 Ranch Wagon!

                            Bill Pressler
                            Kent, OH
                            '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1


                            quote:Originally posted by Chris Pile

                            Mr. Pressley, your comments make me think you have a trailer queen for a Studebaker. The Ford owner can do whatever he likes, without consulting you.


                            And my first cars were a '58 Ford Ranch Wagon, and a '59 4 door Galaxie 500 with factory air. I drove them in snow, too.

                            Chris Pile
                            StudeFolk Manager
                            http://tiny.cc/RYqAK
                            Bill Pressler
                            Kent, OH
                            (formerly Greenville, PA)
                            Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
                            Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
                            1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
                            1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
                            All are in Australia now

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Chris, I believe anybody can do whatever what they want with their own car, I truly do. I just wonder if the owner actually knows that driving it in Pennsylvania salt will significantly diminish its life...unlike later iron. Does Kansas use salt on its roads? I don't know.

                              Pennsylvania has a required annual State Inspection for automobiles. While I admit that I haven't actually lived there for 27 years, it used to be that a car with visible rust holes would not pass state inspection, making it illegal to operate. You'd have to get the holes fixed. Not sure if it's still that stringent, but back when I lived there, we'd kid that you'd see cars from nearby OH (only 8-10 miles up the road, maybe) with railroad ties for bumpers, no hoods, huge rust holes, and know right away they weren't Pennsylvania cars.

                              My Lark was restored as a fairly nice driver, body-on, and with consideration of cost, but I admit I was fussy about authenticity, at least outside, so the Ermine White is just that, the emblems and nameplates are decent and in the right places, I have NOS seat upholstery inside, etc. But it's most definitely not a trailer queen!

                              Gary, I really don't have any experience with '58 Fords (I was born in '58) but my aunt had a cocoa brown with white cove and top, Fairlane two-door sedan which I always thought looked sharp. The two-door sedan had thin, chromed door frames and posts and resembled a hardtop. I always thought it was neat (no particular reason) that the hood opened in a reverse manner from most other cars. Chris, I'd have liked that '58 Ranch Wagon!

                              Bill Pressler
                              Kent, OH
                              '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1


                              quote:Originally posted by Chris Pile

                              Mr. Pressley, your comments make me think you have a trailer queen for a Studebaker. The Ford owner can do whatever he likes, without consulting you.


                              And my first cars were a '58 Ford Ranch Wagon, and a '59 4 door Galaxie 500 with factory air. I drove them in snow, too.

                              Chris Pile
                              StudeFolk Manager
                              http://tiny.cc/RYqAK
                              Bill Pressler
                              Kent, OH
                              (formerly Greenville, PA)
                              Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
                              Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
                              1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
                              1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
                              All are in Australia now

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Yeah, well, why not? My 64 Commander is driven in bad weather as its pretty much my only transportation. The only catch is if it gets sick then I use our B car which is a 95 Crown Vic. Even with the tires on it, I manage fine with the vehicle. The only worries I really have is everybody else's driving talent. The only time I don't drive it is heavy snow or ice as the car has dry type street tires, and well, everybody wins in that situation. I found one of the better things is the principles of the blower work wonders when it gets this cold this time of year [8D].

                                They are made for outdoor use last I checked(I think I'm sure, the UL label fell off ages ago, lol). It doesn't mind the snow, it doesn't mind a little rain sitting out in the parking lot at the meet [}].


                                1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                                1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
                                [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
                                [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
                                [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
                                [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]
                                1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                                1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                                1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                                1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                                Comment

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