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'64 hawk Ebay NC $1800

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  • '64 hawk Ebay NC $1800

    has anyone in the area gone and looked at it?
    Mark Riesch
    New Bern, NC

  • #2
    A link would be nice
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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    • #3
      http://www.ebay.com/itm/1964-Studeba...m=162406854475

      Kerry. SDC Member #A012596W. ENCSDC member.

      '51 Champion Business Coupe - (Tom's Car). Purchased 11/2012.

      '40 Champion. sold 10/11. '63 Avanti R-1384. sold 12/10.

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      • #4
        From the looks of the pictures, the car is badly rusted. With the drivers side floor rusted into the door post, it will be an expensive proposition to restore the car. I would say that is probably good only as a parts car. Bud

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bud View Post
          From the looks of the pictures, the car is badly rusted. With the drivers side floor rusted into the door post, it will be an expensive proposition to restore the car. I would say that is probably good only as a parts car. Bud
          I'm with you. With the floor and trunk floor that far gone and so many parts already missing, I think it's best suited for parts. Unless that red primer is covering up a bunch of bondo, the sheetmetal doesn't look too bad. And we all know how desirable a nice '64 Hawk deck lid is.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mbstude View Post
            I'm with you. With the floor and trunk floor that far gone and so many parts already missing, I think it's best suited for parts. Unless that red primer is covering up a bunch of bondo, the sheetmetal doesn't look too bad. And we all know how desirable a nice '64 Hawk deck lid is.
            I also agree. I sold my 64 GT with 4-V 289, pwr stg, pwr disc brakes, full instrumentation, auto floor shift, new tires and much less rust in 2015 for $1700. I'm just down the road, but I've seen enough in the pics to turn me off.
            edp/NC
            \'63 Avanti
            \'66 Commander

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            • #7
              Just lookin at the pix, my back begins to ache. LOL

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              • #8
                I was not planning to restore it I was looking at it as a parts car, engine, trans. ect. does the floor shift indicate which trans. it has?
                Mark Riesch
                New Bern, NC

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                • #9
                  It's a Borg Warner Powershift Transmision
                  It is an addiction!

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                  • #10
                    Parts car is about its only use. I hope who evet gets it turns the Vin number into the Hawk registry so we know it's fate.

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                    • #11
                      I hear they're not making 1964 Hawk's in Canada anymore, and the supply is limited and dwindling. I've seen much worse beginnings under the hands of a dedicated enthusiast, turn into an outstanding show piece. If I weren't now so durn old I'd snap it up immediately. Hope someone younger has the foresight to buy it and either fix it or stash it for someone who will.

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                      • #12
                        It definitely could be built but I would rather pay more to get a decent builder! This car is just marginally better than the 57K mile '64 GT I bought at Naugle's sale for $300. and just as far from home.
                        Barry'd in Studes

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                        • #13
                          FYI Engine Id is PH322

                          P Hawk/Lark-type 289
                          H Aug
                          3 1963
                          22 Day
                          64 Avanti R1 R5529

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                          • #14
                            I tend to get a kick out of the perfectionists that insist on starting out with a 'decent builder'. Then comes the complete engine rebuild, the trans rebuild, the suspension rebuild, the brake system rebuild, the power steering refurbishment, and then the body-off-frame stripped-to-bare-metal repaint, the polish & rechrome of all of that dull 50+ year old trim and bumpers, and/or the purchase of x thousand $$$ in NOS, new lenses, new wiring harnesses, new windshield and perhaps a few other pieces of glass that are less than perfect, a new headliner. The 50+ year old vinyl if not already split, is stiff and brittle, and lost it luster, so order up a complete all new interior.
                            So they end up spending as much, if not more than the guy that starts out with a 500$ hulk.
                            Rust seems to be the biggy that scares the bejesus out of many, but unless it has progressed to ridiculous extents, is repairable at relatively little cost by any dedicated home craftsman willing to learn a few new skills.
                            A few years ago I replaced practically the entire floor-pan in one of my '64 Daytona's. A used gas welding set up and a discounted mig only ran a couple of hundred bucks. A trip to the scrap yard netted two old '70s Cadillac hoods for a whopping $50, a couple of weekends, employing cardboard patterns and working in small sections and using hammer and scrap steel carefully reproduced the factory indentation details, 'hammer-welded' into place, I had a new 'Studillac' floor that was virtually indistinguishable from the factory original. Having so polished the skills by hands on experience, the floor work on that Hawk wouldn't be much of a deterrent.
                            And as for the rest of the costs, they are common to what goes into a 'correct' restoration of any old vehicle.
                            If one can be content with only having a 'nice' and safe old daily driver, the amount of detail work and time and money spent can be reduced considerably, or spread out over decades of ownership.
                            Last edited by Jessie J.; 03-03-2017, 10:51 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jessie J. View Post
                              I tend to get a kick out of the perfectionists that insist on starting out with a 'decent builder'. Then comes the complete engine rebuild, the trans rebuild, the suspension rebuild, the brake system rebuild, the power steering refurbishment, and then the body-off-frame stripped-to-bare-metal repaint, the polish & rechrome of all of that dull 50+ year old trim and bumpers, and/or the purchase of x thousand $$$ in NOS, new lenses, new wiring harnesses, new windshield and perhaps a few other pieces of glass that are less than perfect, a new headliner. The 50+ year old vinyl if not already split, is stiff and brittle, and lost it luster, so order up a complete all new interior.
                              So they end up spending as much, if not more than the guy that starts out with a 500$ hulk.
                              Rust seems to be the biggy that scares the bejesus out of many, but unless it has progressed to ridiculous extents, is repairable at relatively little cost by any dedicated home craftsman willing to learn a few new skills.
                              A few years ago I replaced practically the entire floor-pan in one of my '64 Daytona's. A used gas welding set up and a discounted mig only ran a couple of hundred bucks. A trip to the scrap yard netted two old '70s Cadillac hoods for a whopping $50, a couple of weekends, employing cardboard patterns and working in small sections and using hammer and scrap steel carefully reproduced the factory indentation details, 'hammer-welded' into place, I had a new 'Studillac' floor that was virtually indistinguishable from the factory original. Having so polished the skills by hands on experience, the floor work on that Hawk wouldn't be much of a deterrent.
                              And as for the rest of the costs, they are common to what goes into a 'correct' restoration of any old vehicle.
                              If one can be content with only having a 'nice' and safe old daily driver, the amount of detail work and time and money spent can be reduced considerably, or spread out over decades of ownership.
                              Dang, Jeff.... Thats pretty close to blasphemy. How dare you suggest someone build a daily driver for cheap. That would never mollify the Pharisees of the Studebaker Elite.
                              But then again, you should see the floors on my wagon. I used an old metal desk which donated its sheet metal for the floors. I didn't even bother to hammer out the indentation details you mentioned. I may just be burned at the stake.
                              sals54

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