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  • ralt12
    replied
    Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
    VERY interesting information!

    Thanks for posting that! I'll bet RQ doesn't even have those letters in his collection!!

    Craig
    Those letters are from the Porsche Museum and were part of the Porsche exhibit at the Petersen Museum in L.A.

    Leave a comment:


  • garyash
    replied
    Doug:

    The rear window of the Porsche Lark had glass in the center and formed 1/4" steel plate at the corners. To fit the Porsche engine and VW Transporter transaxle in, a lot of the body and frame had to be cut away. To reinforce the body and frame and create a mounting surface, a big steel plate was added as a rear firewall between the engine compartment and rear seat. I think those steel "window corners" were welded to the firewall plate for stiffness. See my full notes back in Post #16 of this thread. Again, the Porsche Lark had nothing to do with the Type 542 being discussed here.

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  • DougHolverson
    replied
    Were those V6s metric or SAE? Why did the Porsche-Lark have a three part rear window with the corners painted over?

    Leave a comment:


  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by ralt12 View Post
    And, for those who are a little more interested, here's some correspondence between the two companies.....
    VERY interesting information!

    Thanks for posting that! I'll bet RQ doesn't even have those letters in his collection!!

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • ralt12
    replied
    And, for those who are a little more interested, here's some correspondence between the two companies.....

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    It is interesting how the engines in the link show bolted valve covers, while the engine in E.T. Reynold's autobiography in the December, 1973 Car Classics magazine shows one with the valve covers held down with spring wire.



    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by rkapteyn View Post
    Note my response to this excellent article.

    Leave a comment:


  • rkapteyn
    replied
    More here!
    https://56packardman.com/2016/07/05/...ed-by-porsche/

    Leave a comment:


  • Bordeaux Daytona
    replied
    http://studebaker-info.org/studepors...porsche08.html

    Leave a comment:


  • t walgamuth
    replied
    Originally posted by garyash View Post
    For those of you who want more details on the various Porsche-Studebaker cars, take a look at Dede Sewards' blog:
    https://dedeporsche.com/2012/11/03/p...ject-type-542/
    She certainly found a lot of the history and some good photos, including the stuff on my website, LOL!

    The strange positioning of the trunk lid was not done by Curtis-Wright or Studebaker. I don't think the Lark ever made it South Bend, just the C-W facility in NJ. The lid change was done by the last owner because the car overheated frequently. Curtis-Wright put the engine in the trunk behind an incredibly thick steel plate and installed a small Porsche vent in the trunk lid. The rear windshield was narrowed and 1/4" thick steel plates were used to replace the corners and stiffen the body. Apparently there was not enough air circulation. The car was never intended for production, just as a mule to eventually test Wankel rotary engines. They didn't get beyond evaluating how the car performed with the tiny 1300 cc Porsche engine, which certainly weighed much less than the Champ 6 with automatic that the car originally came with. Porsche's only involvement in this car was to sell C-W a used, rebuilt circa 1953 Porsche engine that they apparently had in a warehouse in NJ. I drove the car around the circle in my driveway on one day and noted that it didn't have any "punch", though it might have been interesting to try it on some winding country roads with the engine wound up. [Tom Walgamuth: you would have loved an opportunity like that!] When it was at my house, it didn't have the hydraulic brakes working, only the handbrake, and the dual Weber carbs gushed gas all over the place. I had to shut it down before it caught fire, and that would have been embarrassing. I was just babysitting the car for a few weeks until the transporter arrived to haul it to the Museum. However, the previous owner had driven it all over New England for many years before the car was donated to the museum, so it was roadable - or had been. I'm sure that getting the carbs rebuilt and installing some new wheel cylinder kits and brake shoes would have the car running just fine. I've dreamed about seeing it driving around at a meet in South Bend. I'll help raise the money.

    The small Porsche Type 633 car was an entirely different project.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]60362[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]60363[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]60364[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]60365[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]60366[/ATTACH]
    You got me figured out.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bordeaux Daytona
    replied
    I received the April issue of Collectible Automobile today and there's a nice article about the 542 project.
    Last edited by Bordeaux Daytona; 01-24-2017, 05:51 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    This takes my memory back many years to when I was offered that Porsche powered Lark when it was "unearthed" in the warehouse in NJ. I didn't want it.

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeNorm
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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  • garyash
    replied
    For those of you who want more details on the various Porsche-Studebaker cars, take a look at Dede Sewards' blog:
    https://dedeporsche.com/2012/11/03/p...ject-type-542/
    She certainly found a lot of the history and some good photos, including the stuff on my website, LOL!

    The strange positioning of the trunk lid was not done by Curtis-Wright or Studebaker. I don't think the Lark ever made it South Bend, just the C-W facility in NJ. The lid change was done by the last owner because the car overheated frequently. Curtis-Wright put the engine in the trunk behind an incredibly thick steel plate and installed a small Porsche vent in the trunk lid. The rear windshield was narrowed and 1/4" thick steel plates were used to replace the corners and stiffen the body. Apparently there was not enough air circulation. The car was never intended for production, just as a mule to eventually test Wankel rotary engines. They didn't get beyond evaluating how the car performed with the tiny 1300 cc Porsche engine, which certainly weighed much less than the Champ 6 with automatic that the car originally came with. Porsche's only involvement in this car was to sell C-W a used, rebuilt circa 1953 Porsche engine that they apparently had in a warehouse in NJ. I drove the car around the circle in my driveway on one day and noted that it didn't have any "punch", though it might have been interesting to try it on some winding country roads with the engine wound up. [Tom Walgamuth: you would have loved an opportunity like that!] When it was at my house, it didn't have the hydraulic brakes working, only the handbrake, and the dual Weber carbs gushed gas all over the place. I had to shut it down before it caught fire, and that would have been embarrassing. I was just babysitting the car for a few weeks until the transporter arrived to haul it to the Museum. However, the previous owner had driven it all over New England for many years before the car was donated to the museum, so it was roadable - or had been. I'm sure that getting the carbs rebuilt and installing some new wheel cylinder kits and brake shoes would have the car running just fine. I've dreamed about seeing it driving around at a meet in South Bend. I'll help raise the money.

    The small Porsche Type 633 car was an entirely different project.

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  • S2Deluxe
    replied
    Originally posted by rkapteyn View Post
    I you have a computer , it is easy to use Google to find answers
    https://www.yahoo.com/news/rear-engi...200012843.html
    Thanks! I understand why it was done but I don't think I care for the look of the lid raised up on blocks the way it was? Seems it wouldn't have been so easily marketable.

    Mark

    Leave a comment:

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