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StudebakerGene
06-08-2016, 12:10 PM
55130

Every now and then it's something very little that seems to be a pain in the ass. I recently re-furbished my engine compartment and added some performance items along the way. I re-ground the camshaft, added the speedee sleeve, new harmonic balancer, new water pump, fuel pump, power steering pump, ported the intake and exhaust ports, new "Mopar Creation" intake manifold, new 600 CFM holley double pumper, petronix electronic ignition, new plugs, cap and rotor. Remarkably the truck started first fire after getting the gas up to the Carb, (I was amazed a little.) I was certain that I would have something that would irritate me a little i.e. leaking hoses, etc, but nothing reared its ugly head right away. Been driving the truck around on short stints for about 3 weeks now and every now and then with the truck at about 2500 rpm in either 2nd or 3rd gear I could feel a slight miss, It really bugged me--- "Big Time." I did all the normal timing adjustment and the carburetor adjustment as well and the truck ran super-- or so I thought! I pulled the plugs last night and when I got to the final #8 plug, this is what I found! Evidently I had banged the end of the plug while installing and bent it. Needless to say, after replacing the plugs again I fired the truck up and OMG what a difference. I must have been on 7 cylinders when the miss appears and with all that new power didn't even feel it, sometimes it's the little things!

RadioRoy
06-08-2016, 05:06 PM
They can also get shorted out by a piece of crud wedged between the gap. That happened on my first car and it sure was a surprise when dad pulled the plugs and found it.

StudebakerGene
06-08-2016, 05:30 PM
i was surprised that there wasn't more power loss, it evidently was firing a little, but as you can see the plug was almost fouled. I kept thinking it was the #5 & #7 spark plug wire interface problem, it's all good now!

Mrs K Corbin
06-09-2016, 06:57 AM
I just got my 2R5 running fantastic again.....

It appears that the modern plugs DON'T tolerate the old practice of sandblast cleaning and regapping..

I dealt with this issue for a while before I broke down and installed new.

Hell, I thought that something serious was wrong. I did compression tests and everything else I could think of before I tried NEW plugs.

Pat Dilling
06-09-2016, 08:59 AM
A long long time ago I remember reading a story in Popular Science where a "seasoned" gentleman was helping some teenagers diagnose a motor with a miss in their hot rod. I recall him asking "which one of you dropped a spark plug?" And he reminded them to always check the gap before installing even with new plugs. Something I have remembered all these years and still do religiously when installing plugs. Glad you got it sorted out, it must really have good power now I recall you were impressed before.

StudebakerGene
06-09-2016, 09:27 AM
Pat,

you know I am very happy with the improvements that I made, The lil truck ran so much stronger than before that this miss was very subtle in nature, but by golly I could still feel it. I took it out again last night and beat the snot out of it to make sure that was in fact the problem. It lit the tires up in second and chirped them in third so, "I am a happy camper!"

DEEPNHOCK
06-09-2016, 10:43 AM
Back in my jobber days, I used to know which way the spark plugs were in their boxes.
When someone would buy a tune up set, I would (lightly) whack the box of spark plugs on the counter and say 'Gapped at the factory'...
I would tell them 'A lot of people have handled those plugs since it came off the assembly line...make sure you gap them'...
Of course I whacked the wire end of the box, but the customers were then in doubt of the correct gap, and check them again.

StudebakerGene
06-09-2016, 11:54 AM
Jeff,

I definitely gapped them before I installed them, that's why I was shocked that the electrode was bent that much. These motors run so smooth and any little deviation makes quite a difference. It would idle and under power seemed to be fine, just at constant throttle and in the rev line produced the miss/stumble. The new intake and carburetor made a ton of difference as well!

DEEPNHOCK
06-09-2016, 01:55 PM
I know you did...
Just telling a story from my youth....

StudebakerGene
06-09-2016, 04:35 PM
I say I gapped them, evidently I got distracted and didn't pay attention, or the electrode was kind of crappily built! Been driving it yesterday and today and man it runs sweet! You gotta love all the thumbs up and jaw dropping as well!

Mrs K Corbin
06-10-2016, 06:46 AM
Ok Gene, publish the specs on that engine, so the rest of us can light some rubber!

DEEPNHOCK
06-10-2016, 06:55 AM
Ok Gene, publish the specs on that engine, so the rest of us can light some rubber!

Here are some pic's Gene sent to me....

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Studebaker%20Air%20Gap%20Custom%20Intake%20Manifolds/160421%20-%20Gene%20Strickland%20Champ%20Truck%20Engine_zpsubzhel8x.jpg

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Studebaker%20Air%20Gap%20Custom%20Intake%20Manifolds/Gene%20Strickland%20Air%20Gap%20Intake%20160309_zpsbfvs8uko.jpg

StudebakerGene
06-10-2016, 09:56 AM
Mrs. K Corbin,

I didn't do a build thread, I guess after all the inquires I decided to call my Nascar buddies who re-ground my cam and serviced my lifters to get the skinny on the specs, here's what they would tell me. They opened the duration up to about 273 degrees and 397 on the lift, the cam and lifters were all micro-polished so he wouldn't guarantee that the final duration and lift weren't changed a little after this process. If you haven't ever witnessed micro-polishing it is truly a site to behold. When you inspect the raw material it is extremely porous, as the polishing process progresses the material is transformed into something so smooth you will not believe it and the final results are truly remarkable. I have several times sang the praises about the intake I purchased from "Deepnhock Jeff Rice," I am not attempting to say that his intakes are the best out there, nor the only options. What I will say is, "you got to get that thing to breathe!" My R1 was rebuilt in 1990 and had roughly 22K on it. I ran compression tests on all the cylinders and all of them were 170 lbs or better. Motor leaked like a overloaded refugee boat, I mean from everywhere, front timing seal, pan gasket, fuel pump, power steering pump, rear end seal, tranny seal, valve covers! I started yanking all the old stuff off including wiring from firewall forward. Next I ordered one of them intakes I keep preaching about from Jeff Rice. He port matched the intake to the gaskets so when it arrived all I had to do was to do the same at the head mating portion.I didn't flow the bowls or anything more than changing the seals and inspecting the valves. When the motor was rebuilt someone did a very nice 3 angle vale job and installed hardened seats. I installed the re-ground camshaft and lifters topped that off with a new cam gear, crank gear and speedee sleeve. I bought a brand new 4150 600 CFM Holley double pumper, manual choke, manual secondaries. Petronix ignition. I also ported the exhaust ports out ever so slightly just to match the gaskets. I'm running the factory radiator with an Avanti water pump, fan clutch, and upgraded to the 7 blade fan. I am running a Tremec 5 speed with a Dana 44 TT with 3:56 gears out back. After upgrading to a 140 Amp alternator, removing the voltage regulator, blowing every fuse that Napa had on the shelf I finally got the electrical sorted out! If you want your 289 to run noticeably better, get rid of that "cast iron" boat anchor intake, get a better carburetor and port the heads and intake and get some adequate spark to it, trust me you will experience the difference and lite the tires up!

StudebakerGene
06-10-2016, 11:18 AM
I should probably clarify the Micro-polishing process a little more, (already got one P.M.) when NASCAR shops receive engine parts etc, they are in normal terms "ready to bolt on." however every shop wants that "edge," and there are all sorts of extremes that they will go to to get it. When a camshaft comes in, it goes under a microscope. At first look you would swear that it was the smoothest part on the planet, under the microscope it looks like the "Middle East" desert after a bomb run. Most shops have jigs set up and they start with abrasive emery and eventually work up until nothing more than a fine past is used to finely polish all wear surfaces. the result is phenomenal and provides a much smoother action and heat dissipation. If there's horsepower to be gained, they go to every 100,000th degree to find it! I might add that this process isn't cheap either, so unless you know someone or have the tools and materials to do it yourself, expect to spend about $750 for the polishing along. it literally takes about 2 whole days to do a camshaft and about the same for lifters!