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Studenut
09-29-2006, 08:56 PM
It is about time to paint my '53 coupe and my restorer doesn't know how to obtain the correct original paint color, which was Coral Red. I furnished a '53 paint chart but the color chip, which looks correct to my eye, is apparently too small to be scanned. He says the Dupont code numbers on that chart are of no use today.
Over the years I have seen many examples of Coral Red at shows. Some were not as I remembered the color; some were good, but without exception the owners of the latter group had no idea how the color was obtained. "The paint shop figured it out!" Unfortunately, I didn't see any cars with that color at Omaha.
Does anyone out there have any infomation about modern paint code numbers that would produce this famous color, which was easily the most often seen color in advertising for the '53?
That new model in 1:18 scale of the '53 coupe has a red color that I think is very close to the original Coral Red. Maybe they could scan that??
Thanks in advance for any help anyone could give on this.


Jerry Buck
Racine, Wisconsin
'53 Champion Coupe - C (owned since 1956)
'61 Lark VI Convertible

JDP
09-29-2006, 09:15 PM
Dupont Auto Paint Color Matching 1-800-3 Dupont (1-800-338-7668)
Call them with the year and color name and they'll give you a modern paint code that can be very close.

http://stude.com/sig.jpg
Studebaker On The Net
http://stude.com
Studebaker News Group
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.autos.studebaker
Arnold Md.
64 Daytona HT
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
63 GT Hawk
63 Avanti R1/AC
63 Avanti R2/4 speed
63 Daytona HT
63 Lark 2 dr.
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark convert
60 Hawk
57 Silver Hawk
53 Starliner
51 Commander

JDP
09-29-2006, 09:15 PM
Dupont Auto Paint Color Matching 1-800-3 Dupont (1-800-338-7668)
Call them with the year and color name and they'll give you a modern paint code that can be very close.

http://stude.com/sig.jpg
Studebaker On The Net
http://stude.com
Studebaker News Group
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.autos.studebaker
Arnold Md.
64 Daytona HT
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
63 GT Hawk
63 Avanti R1/AC
63 Avanti R2/4 speed
63 Daytona HT
63 Lark 2 dr.
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark convert
60 Hawk
57 Silver Hawk
53 Starliner
51 Commander

StudeRich
09-29-2006, 09:20 PM
Jerry; what about using the gas filler door, or inside the trunklid or a door edge, anywhere that is protected and not faded works better to custom color match to, than those inaccurate "Computer Scans" Also search our site for paint formulas, as someone posted the info about contacting Dupont for their crossover to current mixing codes. I think on their website.
OPPS, JDP answered it, while I was typing the answer![^]

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

StudeRich
09-29-2006, 09:20 PM
Jerry; what about using the gas filler door, or inside the trunklid or a door edge, anywhere that is protected and not faded works better to custom color match to, than those inaccurate "Computer Scans" Also search our site for paint formulas, as someone posted the info about contacting Dupont for their crossover to current mixing codes. I think on their website.
OPPS, JDP answered it, while I was typing the answer![^]

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

Studenut
09-29-2006, 10:20 PM
Thanks for the info JDP. I'll try calling Dupont next week. Thanks also to StudeRich for the idea, but it won't work with my car, which was repainted years ago with a Plymouth red.


Jerry Buck
Racine, Wisconsin
'53 Champion Coupe - C (owned since 1956)
'61 Lark VI Convertible

Studenut
09-29-2006, 10:20 PM
Thanks for the info JDP. I'll try calling Dupont next week. Thanks also to StudeRich for the idea, but it won't work with my car, which was repainted years ago with a Plymouth red.


Jerry Buck
Racine, Wisconsin
'53 Champion Coupe - C (owned since 1956)
'61 Lark VI Convertible

55studeman
09-30-2006, 12:03 AM
Definitely try the dupont number. For my two tone, I found a patch several inches wide and very long under the belt moulding and for the other color I grabbed it from the underside of the trunk.

In contrast to what some people say, the scanner worked perfectly and produced dead on colors. Before scanning the paint, it is critical to clean it up first with something along the lines of 3M Finessit. THEN, you MUST do the old test it out method, mix up a SMALL pint size batch. (As a courtesy, you must offer to cover the cost of the paint, and all test batchs -just part of the game, you must keep them happy and helping you). Dab the paint on something and dry it and use your eye or a trained paint store technicians eyes to check for color matching accuarcy, do it under sunlight not flourescents or any other light -the scanner is not always perfect, I will admit that, and so it's important to check. Master painters and master mixers insist on this method, no technology can beat the human eye when it comes to deciding if colors match.

If you can't find a 2"x4" protected and unfaded paint sample on your car, or you stripped the paint already, then take the paint chip, hopefully it's not faded, and go hang out at the paint store. Get a chair, get comfortable, and go through the modern paint chip books. When you find something close, get the master mixer and ask his opinion if its close and see if he'll tweak the one you found to match your own 1950's chip.

I don't work in the autobody industry, I just took some classes and trained myself and shot what an appraiser said was a $10,000 paint job on my car (Paint supplies cost me $2,000, so I saved a lot). So I know what it's like to get paint as an average Joe, and the best advice I can give is stick with a name brand, Dupont (or PPG), and most importantly is to find the Dupont dealer in your area and check them out. Politely become friends with them and figure out who the best mixer is, maybe it's the guy who's there all the time, or ask the owner who the best mixer is. Then meet up with the best mixer and go when they are not busy (VERY important!) such as early afternoon 1-3pm Tuesdays through Fridays. Most shops are very busy in the morning and late afternoon, and just before closing is also bad because they are tired and cranky and won't want to fuss with a picky, time consuming, one time paint sale, classic car guy -which is exaclty what we all are.

If you can't befriend the Paint Dealer or you find that they are pushy, rushed, always too busy to chat, or unfriendly....then walk away!!! Go to another Dupont Dealer in another town, it is worth the effort. Dupont sets up their autopaint sale stores to cover territories with minimal overlap, so you may have to travel but there is always another store and well worth it if they lend you a hand to match up the color for your beauty.

E. West
"The Speedster Kid"
Sunny Northern California
Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)

55studeman
09-30-2006, 12:03 AM
Definitely try the dupont number. For my two tone, I found a patch several inches wide and very long under the belt moulding and for the other color I grabbed it from the underside of the trunk.

In contrast to what some people say, the scanner worked perfectly and produced dead on colors. Before scanning the paint, it is critical to clean it up first with something along the lines of 3M Finessit. THEN, you MUST do the old test it out method, mix up a SMALL pint size batch. (As a courtesy, you must offer to cover the cost of the paint, and all test batchs -just part of the game, you must keep them happy and helping you). Dab the paint on something and dry it and use your eye or a trained paint store technicians eyes to check for color matching accuarcy, do it under sunlight not flourescents or any other light -the scanner is not always perfect, I will admit that, and so it's important to check. Master painters and master mixers insist on this method, no technology can beat the human eye when it comes to deciding if colors match.

If you can't find a 2"x4" protected and unfaded paint sample on your car, or you stripped the paint already, then take the paint chip, hopefully it's not faded, and go hang out at the paint store. Get a chair, get comfortable, and go through the modern paint chip books. When you find something close, get the master mixer and ask his opinion if its close and see if he'll tweak the one you found to match your own 1950's chip.

I don't work in the autobody industry, I just took some classes and trained myself and shot what an appraiser said was a $10,000 paint job on my car (Paint supplies cost me $2,000, so I saved a lot). So I know what it's like to get paint as an average Joe, and the best advice I can give is stick with a name brand, Dupont (or PPG), and most importantly is to find the Dupont dealer in your area and check them out. Politely become friends with them and figure out who the best mixer is, maybe it's the guy who's there all the time, or ask the owner who the best mixer is. Then meet up with the best mixer and go when they are not busy (VERY important!) such as early afternoon 1-3pm Tuesdays through Fridays. Most shops are very busy in the morning and late afternoon, and just before closing is also bad because they are tired and cranky and won't want to fuss with a picky, time consuming, one time paint sale, classic car guy -which is exaclty what we all are.

If you can't befriend the Paint Dealer or you find that they are pushy, rushed, always too busy to chat, or unfriendly....then walk away!!! Go to another Dupont Dealer in another town, it is worth the effort. Dupont sets up their autopaint sale stores to cover territories with minimal overlap, so you may have to travel but there is always another store and well worth it if they lend you a hand to match up the color for your beauty.

E. West
"The Speedster Kid"
Sunny Northern California
Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)