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drnittler
11-15-2007, 08:42 AM
I am interested to hear from people who use their Stude's as daily drivers who may commute forty plus miles per day times five days..I am considering this scheme..Mine would be highway miles...

David G. Nittler

Mike Van Veghten
11-15-2007, 08:48 AM
Well...I'm sorta there.
I split my time between my 59 Lark 2dr wagon and my bike. 81 miles a day, 5 days a week.

What would you like to know, other than the regular oil changes and tuneups come faster at those miles driven per day!
Mine are also freeway miles....that said...have you seen the So. Cal. freeways at 6am and 5pm?

Mike

Mike Van Veghten
11-15-2007, 08:48 AM
Well...I'm sorta there.
I split my time between my 59 Lark 2dr wagon and my bike. 81 miles a day, 5 days a week.

What would you like to know, other than the regular oil changes and tuneups come faster at those miles driven per day!
Mine are also freeway miles....that said...have you seen the So. Cal. freeways at 6am and 5pm?

Mike

drnittler
11-15-2007, 08:55 AM
My highway miles would be emply keep going types on an TX interstate.
I am considering sell my 08 Ranger and doing this. I read in Hemmings Classic car where a guy used an antique station wagon as his regular vehicle and sold his Ford F150.

David G. Nittler

drnittler
11-15-2007, 08:55 AM
My highway miles would be emply keep going types on an TX interstate.
I am considering sell my 08 Ranger and doing this. I read in Hemmings Classic car where a guy used an antique station wagon as his regular vehicle and sold his Ford F150.

David G. Nittler

65cruiser
11-15-2007, 09:10 AM
David,

I did this for 2+ years driving my 65 Cruiser. Put over 20,000 miles on her during that time period. No problems whatoever in Louisville interstate traffic. The only drawback was it was really hot in the summer with no AC. I'm now driving an 06 Sebring convertible, but not nearly as fun as the Studebaker (unless the top is down)[:p]

Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm
Home of the Cruiser Registry

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

65cruiser
11-15-2007, 09:10 AM
David,

I did this for 2+ years driving my 65 Cruiser. Put over 20,000 miles on her during that time period. No problems whatoever in Louisville interstate traffic. The only drawback was it was really hot in the summer with no AC. I'm now driving an 06 Sebring convertible, but not nearly as fun as the Studebaker (unless the top is down)[:p]

Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm
Home of the Cruiser Registry

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

63larkcustom
11-15-2007, 09:44 AM
I've done it before and will soon be doing it again. Go for it and enjoy.

63larkcustom
11-15-2007, 09:44 AM
I've done it before and will soon be doing it again. Go for it and enjoy.

Roscomacaw
11-15-2007, 10:54 AM
I drove Studes daily thru the 70s, 80s and into the 90s. While I don't go out every day now (I'm quite the "homebody" lately), when I DO go someplace, it's in a Stude.;)

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

Roscomacaw
11-15-2007, 10:54 AM
I drove Studes daily thru the 70s, 80s and into the 90s. While I don't go out every day now (I'm quite the "homebody" lately), when I DO go someplace, it's in a Stude.;)

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

mapman
11-15-2007, 11:13 AM
I have never done this as much as you are talking about but have found that there is a "shake-out" period when you start driving a car a that was not used much for a long period. Usually just small things, fuel filters, plug wires and loose bolts, but don't sell all the other cars right away. Once a car is kind of re-broken-in it does well.
Rob

mapman
11-15-2007, 11:13 AM
I have never done this as much as you are talking about but have found that there is a "shake-out" period when you start driving a car a that was not used much for a long period. Usually just small things, fuel filters, plug wires and loose bolts, but don't sell all the other cars right away. Once a car is kind of re-broken-in it does well.
Rob

monomaniac
11-15-2007, 12:52 PM
And that's the point. You have to drive them often (like daily) to exercise them, to keep them regular and enable them to be dependable.
For the last 25 years at least I have driven a Studebaker daily. Last three years was a 66 Cruiser in which time I accumulated 46,000 miles and other than replacing an alternator, doing the brakes once and rebuilding a radiator, the rest was routine. Jump in, turn the key and go!
Now I'm breaking in a "new" one. It's a 64 Daytona and it is now the daily driver. In the first two months I covered only 1400 miles. To be ready for daily use I did the brakes, new shocks, new center pin and replaced the worn out 2bbl Stromberg with a new Edelbrock. I might need tires before winter is over and perhaps a tuneup. But the wipers work, the heater puts out plenty of warmth. I'm set!

monomaniac
11-15-2007, 12:52 PM
And that's the point. You have to drive them often (like daily) to exercise them, to keep them regular and enable them to be dependable.
For the last 25 years at least I have driven a Studebaker daily. Last three years was a 66 Cruiser in which time I accumulated 46,000 miles and other than replacing an alternator, doing the brakes once and rebuilding a radiator, the rest was routine. Jump in, turn the key and go!
Now I'm breaking in a "new" one. It's a 64 Daytona and it is now the daily driver. In the first two months I covered only 1400 miles. To be ready for daily use I did the brakes, new shocks, new center pin and replaced the worn out 2bbl Stromberg with a new Edelbrock. I might need tires before winter is over and perhaps a tuneup. But the wipers work, the heater puts out plenty of warmth. I'm set!

cjsteak
11-15-2007, 01:31 PM
Heck ya! Drive a classic daily, but don't get rid of the newer vehicle until all the kinks are worked out. I alternated between my '49 CJ2A Jeep and my '71 Triumph TR6 as daily rides for over 3 years straight. I put 40k on the TR6 in those 3 years, and about the same on the Willys.

I'm trying to get back into that with my Commander, and I might be picking up a small cab '62 Willys pickup that's ready for the road next weekend. Hopefully my newer Mustang sells this weekend to free up some room and cash!

I can't wait to drive a classic daily again. [^]

Chris Salisbury
Hutto/Austin, TX

1958 Commander Starlight Hardtop

cjsteak
11-15-2007, 01:31 PM
Heck ya! Drive a classic daily, but don't get rid of the newer vehicle until all the kinks are worked out. I alternated between my '49 CJ2A Jeep and my '71 Triumph TR6 as daily rides for over 3 years straight. I put 40k on the TR6 in those 3 years, and about the same on the Willys.

I'm trying to get back into that with my Commander, and I might be picking up a small cab '62 Willys pickup that's ready for the road next weekend. Hopefully my newer Mustang sells this weekend to free up some room and cash!

I can't wait to drive a classic daily again. [^]

Chris Salisbury
Hutto/Austin, TX

1958 Commander Starlight Hardtop

doug
11-15-2007, 01:54 PM
I have driven nothing but Studebakers since the mid-seventies. I have commuted 23 miles each day on the freeway for three years. 1 mechanical problem so far (went home and changed cars) and only tire problems have stopped my drives. I stay away from old tire now, six years and replace.

doug
11-15-2007, 01:54 PM
I have driven nothing but Studebakers since the mid-seventies. I have commuted 23 miles each day on the freeway for three years. 1 mechanical problem so far (went home and changed cars) and only tire problems have stopped my drives. I stay away from old tire now, six years and replace.

Allan Songer
11-15-2007, 02:26 PM
My wife has driven Studebakers as daily transport for most of her adult life--since about 1984. She put about 80,000 miles on a 4-speed GT Hawk and then sold it and has been driving her '55 E7 pickup for the past 8-9 years. She drives about 10,000 miles per year, so not the 80 miles per day average you're talking about but still an impressive feat.

The Hawk was not NEARLY as reliable as the pickup. It came in on a hook at least once per year on average with a variety of ailments. The truck has let her down ONCE. People can't believe she drives a 52 year old truck every day! The secret is MANIACAL attention to detail when it comes to maintaining your vehicle--we're talking about DAILY visual inspections, etc.

You can do it! Many of us here have!!

Allan Songer
11-15-2007, 02:26 PM
My wife has driven Studebakers as daily transport for most of her adult life--since about 1984. She put about 80,000 miles on a 4-speed GT Hawk and then sold it and has been driving her '55 E7 pickup for the past 8-9 years. She drives about 10,000 miles per year, so not the 80 miles per day average you're talking about but still an impressive feat.

The Hawk was not NEARLY as reliable as the pickup. It came in on a hook at least once per year on average with a variety of ailments. The truck has let her down ONCE. People can't believe she drives a 52 year old truck every day! The secret is MANIACAL attention to detail when it comes to maintaining your vehicle--we're talking about DAILY visual inspections, etc.

You can do it! Many of us here have!!

PlainBrownR2
11-15-2007, 04:49 PM
I have driven my Lark for 8 years or so since high school. Despite people who never seen the engine compartment of one, shying away from the cars, the vehicles are fairly simple and fairly basic to maintain. Of course being an older vehicle you might have your share of trivial bleep to contend with. For example in my case I have a bulb and socket in the tach that flickers due to a loose connection. You know, that kinda stuff. Now in the case of letting go of the 08 Ranger, I'd hang on to it as a backup car(or truck). People here would probably hiss at the statement but I have had a fair share of my own problems that couldn't be solved by an immediate call or a run to NAPA's or SI's computer systems. These mainly came from the vacuum booster and alternator. Finding an NOS dual reservoir drum booster is not an easy task, nor was finding a 35 or 40 amp alternator(of which was solved with a 45 amp Motorola alternator). So while the car was down, which was rare, I used our Mercury Grand Marquis until the problem was fixed. I'm not saying things could go wrong, but like any mechanical marvel assume they might. I would also recommend having spare or backup parts in case something goes wrong. This is what we also did with the booster and the alternator.

The Lark was also fitted with radials, seat belts, electric fuel pump in place of the mechanical fuel pump, filters, and regulator. This might sound excessive, but at least I'd recommend the electric fuel pump just for ease of firing. Maintain the mechanicals, keep the fluids up, keep your tires aired, you know, all of the basics, and it should last you many years. The drivers around here are insane enough that they don't care for much whether its a Model T or a Toyota Tundra, if I can drive it daily around congested surburbia, I can drive it anywhere.

Go for it!! Enjoy it, you might like it!!


1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]

PlainBrownR2
11-15-2007, 04:49 PM
I have driven my Lark for 8 years or so since high school. Despite people who never seen the engine compartment of one, shying away from the cars, the vehicles are fairly simple and fairly basic to maintain. Of course being an older vehicle you might have your share of trivial bleep to contend with. For example in my case I have a bulb and socket in the tach that flickers due to a loose connection. You know, that kinda stuff. Now in the case of letting go of the 08 Ranger, I'd hang on to it as a backup car(or truck). People here would probably hiss at the statement but I have had a fair share of my own problems that couldn't be solved by an immediate call or a run to NAPA's or SI's computer systems. These mainly came from the vacuum booster and alternator. Finding an NOS dual reservoir drum booster is not an easy task, nor was finding a 35 or 40 amp alternator(of which was solved with a 45 amp Motorola alternator). So while the car was down, which was rare, I used our Mercury Grand Marquis until the problem was fixed. I'm not saying things could go wrong, but like any mechanical marvel assume they might. I would also recommend having spare or backup parts in case something goes wrong. This is what we also did with the booster and the alternator.

The Lark was also fitted with radials, seat belts, electric fuel pump in place of the mechanical fuel pump, filters, and regulator. This might sound excessive, but at least I'd recommend the electric fuel pump just for ease of firing. Maintain the mechanicals, keep the fluids up, keep your tires aired, you know, all of the basics, and it should last you many years. The drivers around here are insane enough that they don't care for much whether its a Model T or a Toyota Tundra, if I can drive it daily around congested surburbia, I can drive it anywhere.

Go for it!! Enjoy it, you might like it!!


1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]

DilloCrafter
11-15-2007, 06:17 PM
I think David has two Studebakers, so he'll have one for backup. And selling the 2008 Ranger will finance whatever the two Studes need done, right, Dave?

http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
[i]The Red-Headed Amazon
Deep in the heart of Texas

DilloCrafter
11-15-2007, 06:17 PM
I think David has two Studebakers, so he'll have one for backup. And selling the 2008 Ranger will finance whatever the two Studes need done, right, Dave?

http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
[i]The Red-Headed Amazon
Deep in the heart of Texas

cjsteak
11-15-2007, 06:36 PM
I agree with PlainBrownR2 whole heartedly. My TR6 had upgraded tires, electric fuel pump etc etc... pretty much what he described. Through all the years I was driving the Willys or TR6, I always had the use of my parents old 1984 Ford diesel farm truck that ran no matter what. I was pretty fortunate to have that opportunity as I did have both of my vehicles crap out on me in the same day once.

To the folks who only have Studes and don't have a modern day backup vehicle, I salute you! :D I know that with my job if i'm late i'm in trouble... and if i'm late more than once or twice I get promoted to customer if you know what I mean.

If you're not retired and HAVE to be places to continue living your life normally, get a modern "beater" that is just a no frills ride incase the classic craps out on ya. Telling the bossman that your 50+ year old car crapped out on ya might work once... atleast at my job... ;)

Chris Salisbury
Hutto/Austin, TX

1958 Commander Starlight Hardtop

cjsteak
11-15-2007, 06:36 PM
I agree with PlainBrownR2 whole heartedly. My TR6 had upgraded tires, electric fuel pump etc etc... pretty much what he described. Through all the years I was driving the Willys or TR6, I always had the use of my parents old 1984 Ford diesel farm truck that ran no matter what. I was pretty fortunate to have that opportunity as I did have both of my vehicles crap out on me in the same day once.

To the folks who only have Studes and don't have a modern day backup vehicle, I salute you! :D I know that with my job if i'm late i'm in trouble... and if i'm late more than once or twice I get promoted to customer if you know what I mean.

If you're not retired and HAVE to be places to continue living your life normally, get a modern "beater" that is just a no frills ride incase the classic craps out on ya. Telling the bossman that your 50+ year old car crapped out on ya might work once... atleast at my job... ;)

Chris Salisbury
Hutto/Austin, TX

1958 Commander Starlight Hardtop

PlainBrownR2
11-15-2007, 06:52 PM
I should add that I also learned in an emergency situation to bandage or repair items on the fly if possible. My electric pump fuse earlier this summer didn't just blow, it melted with the rubber housing around it. This caused my car to shut down and allowed me to coast to a stop onto the shoulder. Of course it left me with no pump and no fuel. [:o] I had some wire, a stripper, a crimper, and some extra splices. I snipped out the wire and housing, spliced in a wire, and I was on my way. The next day I went to Radio Shack for another fuse and housing with the prospects it wouldn't happen again. Far as I know still hasn't.

Here here Chris. I still goto school and I have to intern at another. It might only work a couple of times that the car does something silly, it happens, and then they might start getting the impression you don't wanna work with the kids, lol ;).

PlainBrownR2
11-15-2007, 06:52 PM
I should add that I also learned in an emergency situation to bandage or repair items on the fly if possible. My electric pump fuse earlier this summer didn't just blow, it melted with the rubber housing around it. This caused my car to shut down and allowed me to coast to a stop onto the shoulder. Of course it left me with no pump and no fuel. [:o] I had some wire, a stripper, a crimper, and some extra splices. I snipped out the wire and housing, spliced in a wire, and I was on my way. The next day I went to Radio Shack for another fuse and housing with the prospects it wouldn't happen again. Far as I know still hasn't.

Here here Chris. I still goto school and I have to intern at another. It might only work a couple of times that the car does something silly, it happens, and then they might start getting the impression you don't wanna work with the kids, lol ;).

drnittler
11-16-2007, 08:49 AM
Thanks for all the replies. I do have two Studes a 61 Lark and a 62 lark (The one I have/had for sale). I also have a 29 Checy coupe
Plan a is to sell the 62 and raise $ to improve my 61 which my first and a keeper. The idea was to help pay for the 08 ranger and put $ into the 61.
Plan B calls for selling the Ranger, pay it off put extra$ into the 61 and 62.
Plan C call for selling the 62 and 29 chevy putting money intopaying the 08 ranger and getting my 61 to countours (almost) shape.

David G. Nittler

drnittler
11-16-2007, 08:49 AM
Thanks for all the replies. I do have two Studes a 61 Lark and a 62 lark (The one I have/had for sale). I also have a 29 Checy coupe
Plan a is to sell the 62 and raise $ to improve my 61 which my first and a keeper. The idea was to help pay for the 08 ranger and put $ into the 61.
Plan B calls for selling the Ranger, pay it off put extra$ into the 61 and 62.
Plan C call for selling the 62 and 29 chevy putting money intopaying the 08 ranger and getting my 61 to countours (almost) shape.

David G. Nittler

mbstude
11-16-2007, 09:36 AM
Well, being only 17 years old, my driving experience is quite limited. ;) I've been driving a Stude since I turned 16, as that's all that I own. I started out in my '63 Daytona, which only let me down once when it got hot and blew a freeze plug. [:I] And other than it being a worn out, rattly hardtop, it wasn't too bad! My Mom has a few stories of her own from that car however; such as when a gas tank comes unbolted and drags on the ashphalt, it will create sparks. [:0]

I also owned a '51 2R16 dump truck for a few months, the one I won in the raffle. I didn't drive it much at all, I just let my grandad keep it exercised as he used it in his business. ;) I did drive it to school once though. [^]

I've had the orange Scotsman since August of '06, and it's been a really fun, realiable way of going. I have to confess though, it has had a few hiccups, but nothing major at all. I've gone through a few crappy fuel pumps and a couple other minor things. The most major I have to say would be the when the tranny mount broke, causing the front engine mount ot break. Then that allowed the motor to raise up and cut the top radiator hose, and the clutch would slip too. That was an interesting drive to the shop... :D
But, as I sit here in my computer class at school and type this, I'm sorry to say that today, I didn't drive my Studebaker to school. I opened the hood earlier this week, and when I went to close it, the prop wasn't completely in place behind the little tab on the bottom side of the hood. And, when I let the hood down, of course the prop fell down and put a fairly decent sized hole in the radiator. (My biggest Studebaker-related boneheaded move to date ;)) So, even though I'm driving a F*rd today, and the Stude is inoperable, I can only blame myself, not the 48 year old truck. :) I will have it back on the road as soon as I get home, however. [8D][^]

Matthew Burnette
'59 Scotsman
'63 Daytona
Hazlehurst, GA

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/00_night.jpg

mbstude
11-16-2007, 09:36 AM
Well, being only 17 years old, my driving experience is quite limited. ;) I've been driving a Stude since I turned 16, as that's all that I own. I started out in my '63 Daytona, which only let me down once when it got hot and blew a freeze plug. [:I] And other than it being a worn out, rattly hardtop, it wasn't too bad! My Mom has a few stories of her own from that car however; such as when a gas tank comes unbolted and drags on the ashphalt, it will create sparks. [:0]

I also owned a '51 2R16 dump truck for a few months, the one I won in the raffle. I didn't drive it much at all, I just let my grandad keep it exercised as he used it in his business. ;) I did drive it to school once though. [^]

I've had the orange Scotsman since August of '06, and it's been a really fun, realiable way of going. I have to confess though, it has had a few hiccups, but nothing major at all. I've gone through a few crappy fuel pumps and a couple other minor things. The most major I have to say would be the when the tranny mount broke, causing the front engine mount ot break. Then that allowed the motor to raise up and cut the top radiator hose, and the clutch would slip too. That was an interesting drive to the shop... :D
But, as I sit here in my computer class at school and type this, I'm sorry to say that today, I didn't drive my Studebaker to school. I opened the hood earlier this week, and when I went to close it, the prop wasn't completely in place behind the little tab on the bottom side of the hood. And, when I let the hood down, of course the prop fell down and put a fairly decent sized hole in the radiator. (My biggest Studebaker-related boneheaded move to date ;)) So, even though I'm driving a F*rd today, and the Stude is inoperable, I can only blame myself, not the 48 year old truck. :) I will have it back on the road as soon as I get home, however. [8D][^]

Matthew Burnette
'59 Scotsman
'63 Daytona
Hazlehurst, GA

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/00_night.jpg

Rosstude
11-16-2007, 11:09 AM
My experience with driving Studes has been good, they have proven to be quite reliable rigs. My wife has driven nothing but a Stude wagon (2 actually) for the past 14 years or so, totaling about 15 to 20,000 miles per year. Been on a flat bed only twice, once because of tranny failure during the initial shake down period, and once with a bad water pump on the GM powered 66 Wagonaire. As noted by others, using a car this old for daily transportation has some risks involved, and more importantly your maintenance, and repairs must be top notch to avoid some of the risks. Personally I feel that for a daily driver some modifications are the prudent thing to do, verses a “restored” show type car that is not subjected to such demands. Brakes, cooling system, seat belts, electrical & ignition, fuel system, suspension & steering, all come to mind as some areas that I might modify from stock form as needed for a daily driver.
A back up vehicle is wise in my opinion, mine happen to be a 1964, and 1957, so age is not as important as mechanical condition in my eyes.
Your plan A, and B look wise to me. Bottom line is that it is your call. There are so many variables, how handy are you with tools? Got a little Mc Giver in you? Got a family? Car pool, public transportation, flexible schedule for work? Willing to take a risk?
I’m a cheap-ahh.. frugal person by nature, so I would be inclined to dump the 08 and related payments, and put the monthly payment monies toward the Stude, but that reflects me and my situation. I have to drive a 06 company car at work, I much prefer my oldies.
Go fire up one of those Studes, and drive it! If your like me and got the bug bad, you’ll know right away if you prefer the old car sights, sounds, and feel over the new plastic cocoon.

[img=left]http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g27/Rosstude/OldWorld2005002.jpg[/img=left]
Ross.
Riverside, Ca.
1957 Provincial X2
1958 Transtar

Rosstude
11-16-2007, 11:09 AM
My experience with driving Studes has been good, they have proven to be quite reliable rigs. My wife has driven nothing but a Stude wagon (2 actually) for the past 14 years or so, totaling about 15 to 20,000 miles per year. Been on a flat bed only twice, once because of tranny failure during the initial shake down period, and once with a bad water pump on the GM powered 66 Wagonaire. As noted by others, using a car this old for daily transportation has some risks involved, and more importantly your maintenance, and repairs must be top notch to avoid some of the risks. Personally I feel that for a daily driver some modifications are the prudent thing to do, verses a “restored” show type car that is not subjected to such demands. Brakes, cooling system, seat belts, electrical & ignition, fuel system, suspension & steering, all come to mind as some areas that I might modify from stock form as needed for a daily driver.
A back up vehicle is wise in my opinion, mine happen to be a 1964, and 1957, so age is not as important as mechanical condition in my eyes.
Your plan A, and B look wise to me. Bottom line is that it is your call. There are so many variables, how handy are you with tools? Got a little Mc Giver in you? Got a family? Car pool, public transportation, flexible schedule for work? Willing to take a risk?
I’m a cheap-ahh.. frugal person by nature, so I would be inclined to dump the 08 and related payments, and put the monthly payment monies toward the Stude, but that reflects me and my situation. I have to drive a 06 company car at work, I much prefer my oldies.
Go fire up one of those Studes, and drive it! If your like me and got the bug bad, you’ll know right away if you prefer the old car sights, sounds, and feel over the new plastic cocoon.

[img=left]http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g27/Rosstude/OldWorld2005002.jpg[/img=left]
Ross.
Riverside, Ca.
1957 Provincial X2
1958 Transtar