PDA

View Full Version : Interior: 64 Daytona dash questions..need advice



skangboy54
06-01-2015, 10:11 PM
my 64 Daytona is being resurrected from a long long time of sitting. I attempted to thoroughly clean the dash yesterday with a toothbrush and a little diluted dawn dishwashing liquid. To my horror, I actually partially brushed the flat black paint off the area around the speedometer and other gauges. I thought it was the soapy color but I wiped off the dash and realized that was silver chrome coming through and it looks ten times worse than it did before I tried to clean it. So.....can I paint that? Is there some special paint to use? Can I buy a new one? How do I get that piece off and where can I find a shop manual that tells me how to do basic things like that?

Question two....the dash pad has a small three inch crack right in the seam to the left of the speaker. The rest of the dash pad looks perfect. Is there some technique to fill that crack and touch it up with something so it looks better?

I will remind everyone before being laughed at for my questions, I have never owned a Studebaker, and have only owned this car for a couple months. While these questions may have an obvious answer to some, I respect the members here enough to seek out answers at the risk of exposing my gross ignorance for all to see.

57pack
06-01-2015, 10:23 PM
I remember Permatex used to make a filler-color match dash vinyl repair kit. Been awhile since I've seen one but maybe still available. A good quality flat black spray paint with some time spent masking should take care of the paint issue.
The only dumb question is the one that isn't asked.

Skip Lackie
06-02-2015, 07:25 AM
The 59-64 shop manual and the 59-64 parts book are available in both reprint and CD form from a number of vendors.
http://www.studebakervendors.com/

In addition, original copies come up on ebay all the time. The parts book has better exploded-view illustrations than does the shop manual, especially for jobs like this.

Both the dash cluster background and the chrome rimmed housing can each be removed by unscrewing them (separately) from the back from the dash pad. The instruments would have to be removed from the front after unplugging them from the back. Any work under the dash is made easier by removing the front seat, allowing you to lie flat on your back. The black paint wears off those chrome dashes fairly easily. Use a good brand of primer when repainting.

Jessie J.
06-02-2015, 10:44 AM
The Shop Manual comes in handy for disassembly, assembly, and repairs but will not provide information on restoring the original finish to 50 year old parts.
For the degraded instrument cluster finish you have a few choices. Live with it. or Carefully mask and re-spray it in place, or Spend considerable time laying on your back under the dashboard engaged in total disassembly and reassembly ....only you can say if you are up to that level of proficiency and endurance.

That said, as a dyed in wool '64 Stude enthusiast since 1963, and present owner of 3 '64 Daytona's (and a half dozen others over the decades),
I can't count the number of otherwise nice Studebakers I have encountered discarded in junkyards with their dashboards disassembled in well intended but half hearted attempts at 'fixing and restoring', the owner having dived in not appreciating the amount of time, labor, and expense.
My guess, from what I have encountered, is that not one out of 50 that have had their dashboards so disassembled are ever put back together again.
Yes it can be done, and many Stude enthusiasts have done so. But I wouldn't recommend it, unless you are extremely enthusiastic and committed to seeing a complex and tedious job through to the end.

BRUCESTUDE
06-02-2015, 10:47 AM
The dash cracks are common in these cars, especially near the speaker. Most folks live with the cracks or find a good (better) used one and re-dye before installing (a HUGE job).

Jessie J.
06-02-2015, 11:25 AM
Mine has small cracks. Even if I were to go through all that is required to replace it, having learned a lesson, I would keep any replacement covered and protected from the sun with a dash-mat. ...and doing that, there would be little incentive to replace what would be out of sight anyway.
Of course if one's goal is owning an SDC award winning stocker, then yes, a displayed perfect replacement is in order. I don't see that in my future.

David Daoust
06-02-2015, 12:50 PM
Skangboy54: Reading your email was like a blast from my past. In 2013 I bought a 64 Daytona with EXACTLY the same issues. First the painted area. As mentioned above, I removed that section (and gauges) so I had only the metal background piece. Then I carefully taped-off the raised "divisions" between the various gauge openings using painters tape and then a razor to trim back the tape where needed. Then I primed and painted it satin black. It came out just fine. The taping and trimming is a bit tedious but it works.

As far as the dash crack is concerned.....I have the exact same crack in the exact same spot. I tried a 3M vinyl repair kit where you need to mix base colors to get what you want. To my amazement I matched the color very well. However, I was less than thrilled with the outcome. It looks a bit better but it by no means completely disguises the crack. I think other responses are accurate....you need to either learn to live with it or have it professionally done.


One thing that was suggested to me (that I didnt do) was to ask a local car dealer for a recommendations for a guy that repairs those type of things all the time. I believe there are people that provide those type of services when dealers re-condition used cars for resale.


Good luck!

Skip Lackie
06-02-2015, 05:28 PM
The Shop Manual comes in handy for disassembly, assembly, and repairs but will not provide information on restoring the original finish to 50 year old parts.
For the degraded instrument cluster finish you have a few choices. Live with it. or Carefully mask and re-spray it in place, or Spend considerable time laying on your back under the dashboard engaged in total disassembly and reassembly ....only you can say if you are up to that level of proficiency and endurance.

That said, as a dyed in wool '64 Stude enthusiast since 1963, and present owner of 3 '64 Daytona's (and a half dozen others over the decades),
I can't count the number of otherwise nice Studebakers I have encountered discarded in junkyards with their dashboards disassembled in well intended but half hearted attempts at 'fixing and restoring', the owner having dived in not appreciating the amount of time, labor, and expense.
My guess, from what I have encountered, is that not one out of 50 that have had their dashboards so disassembled are ever put back together again.
Yes it can be done, and many Stude enthusiasts have done so. But I wouldn't recommend it, unless you are extremely enthusiastic and committed to seeing a complex and tedious job through to the end.

I've done two such cars, and I certainly agree that the job is tedious -- but not that difficult. A blanket on the floor, a good trouble light, and some masking tape and a Sharpie (to label the wires and bulbs) are a really big help. In my view, if the chrome is in good condition, then the results will be worth the effort.

rusty65
06-02-2015, 09:10 PM
I'm undergoing a dash restoration/replacement on my '65 Daytona, not a whole lot different than your '64.I highly recommend you read Showbizkid's (Clark's) "The Studeblogger:Wiring harness replacement" as it details the procedure for removing the instrument cluster.It helped me a great deal.Just as Skip above mentioned,get some masking tape and a Sharpie (or a ballpoint pen if you're a CASO like me)to label everything.Prepare for a backache, wear eye protection and take your time.It's not as bad as it looks.I removed the clock blank first, followed by the speedo, then the Amp/oil/fuel/temp gauge.Any additional questions feel free to PM me.

Jessie J.
06-02-2015, 11:05 PM
Don't be surprised that under handling, that the now 52+ year old, and often now brittle wiring insulation develops cracks, that the ancient fabric reinforced duct work disintegrates into a slinky, and that old and warped cardboard ventilation ductwork and glove box into so many pieces of confetti.
Then, if you have been able to locate such, you can replace your present 50+ year old dash pad with another 50+ year old pad. ...that will, unless kept covered, very likely develop the very same cracks in a relatively short time. I hear that 'Just Dashes' will re-build you a 'new' dash pad for somewhere north of $900
I have mint NOS instrument plates, surrounds, and gauges, that I purchased decades ago ...but will endure with what the factory installed (with cosmetic touch ups) for as long as it remains functional and safe.

christophe
06-03-2015, 07:28 AM
The great Bob Johnstone has scanned the chassis and body parts catalog for you. http://www.studebaker-info.org
http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/59x64bodm/64bodmp105.jpg

rkapteyn
06-03-2015, 10:09 AM
What color is your dash.
I have some N.O.S. 1964/5 dashpads in stock.
Robert Kapteyn
studebaker@mac.com

http://www.studebakerstore.com/Studebakerstore.com/Welcome.html

wittsend
06-04-2015, 06:08 PM
Just wait for a rainy day, take some blue painters tape and an Xacto knife and have at it. I forget how long it took to mask off, but the end results were worth it. Sorry the picture is low resolution, but I think the end results still show. I also resprayed the dash with Krylon "Plastic" paint. It came out acceptable too, a whole lot better than the faded, splotchy red (see the before picture).

showbizkid
06-05-2015, 09:24 AM
Check out this stuff:
http://3mauto.com/products/miscellaneous-repair/3m-leather-and-vinyl-repair-kit-08579.html

44542
Works like the old "Nu Vinyl" kits they sold at Thrifty Drugs back in the 70s. Mix up the color, apply to the crack, use the texture pad to match the grain, let cure.

Mrs K Corbin
06-05-2015, 12:51 PM
If this car's been sitting up that long, your dash is gonna be the least of your worries.....

I'd start with the mechanical (engine, trans, brakes, steering, suspension) first.....

doofus
06-05-2015, 04:41 PM
been there done that. first step lo pressure air and blow gun then small vac to clear out dust. front seat out an excercise pad makes a wonderful cushion and use a lite that wont cook you under there! good luck , Doofus

doofus
06-06-2015, 11:44 AM
Memory returned for a short spell, did 63,64 66 dashes years ago. we unhooked all wiring under hood and pulled dash out with harness attached. on work bench all is laid bare and easy to get to. way easier on back and arms. removing radio makes for better balance pulling dash out. Good Luck , Doofus

skangboy54
06-07-2015, 12:05 AM
wow, that looks fantastic!! very inspiring. thank you for the tip, I'm going to do that.