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View Full Version : Magnaflux your axles boys!!!



RDWEAVER
08-17-2014, 12:43 PM
If you have your rear end apart for bearings and seals a careful inspection of the axles is not enough. Find a shop that can use some sort of process to crack check them. 37094

sals54
08-17-2014, 12:52 PM
WOW… sorry to hear and see of your trouble. It does not appear that the body was damaged in the process. I certainly hope not. Good luck on the fix.

Alan
08-17-2014, 12:54 PM
Looks like someone was trying to do doughnuts on concrete. Smooth move. BTDT. My excuse was I was only 16. That's why I removed the axle and replaced it with a rear out of a 54 Ford Station Wagon. Later, around 61 I went to Ford 9".

PackardV8
08-17-2014, 12:58 PM
While it's apart, do the math and consider stepping up to flanged axles.

Back in the bad old days, I remember being there when SASCO sent a truckload of NOS tapered axles to the scrap yard because they'd been down in the basement or somewhere which received enough water damage to cover them with surface rust. They weren't considered worth cleaning.

jack vines

JoeHall
08-17-2014, 02:32 PM
If you have your rear end apart for bearings and seals a careful inspection of the axles is not enough. Find a shop that can use some sort of process to crack check them. 37094
Having just returned from a 175 mile trip today in the GT, at 70-75 MPH, with family in car, that pic kinda makes me cringe.

blackhawk61
08-17-2014, 02:42 PM
Phil Harris (Fairborn Studebaker)has the cure for that !
http://s245.photobucket.com/user/blackhawk61/library/#/user/blackhawk61/library/Broken%20axle?sort=3&page=1&_suid=14083044601250286668505473707

RadioRoy
08-17-2014, 03:04 PM
I have been yapping about this for over a year. My impression is that many of these axles get cracked from improper placement of the axle key and improper tightening of the axle nut when putting the rear drum/hub back on.

doug
08-17-2014, 03:47 PM
Ouch! Thanks for sharing.

Roscomacaw
08-17-2014, 04:51 PM
I'm with Roy on this. Having found MORE than my share of improperly installed rear hubs thru the years, that HAS to have an impact on the shafts. The leverage of loose parts and the slamming that results can not be good. Not saying these things CAN'T fail, just noting that I've encountered too many that had been put back on wrong.

jackb
08-17-2014, 05:15 PM
.....case in point: what I thought was a blown clutch, turned out to be a completely buggered up rear hub/drum, axle & key, piece of destruction. The key was actually gone and ground down in both grooves. I checked the other side and the same "mechanic" worked there too. Hub was split up through the keyway and it was greased. 1953 2R6....

BobPalma
08-17-2014, 07:06 PM
I have been yapping about this for over a year. My impression is that many of these axles get cracked from improper placement of the axle key and improper tightening of the axle nut.

Absolutely, Roy. It's amazing how many of these tapered axle setups have been ruined by the axle nuts not being tight enough.

Not only do most people not realize how tight they have to be, but few people have a torque wrench that measures much over 100 ft/lb, yet these should be on the order of 180.

Ideally, someone with an accurate torque wrench to 180 ft/lb could do this:

1. Torque a given axle nut to 100 ft/lb

2. Remove the socket and note the position of the castle nut slot nearest to the axle's cotter-key hole at 100 ft/lb.

3. Replace the socket and continue tightening to get to 180 ft/lb.

4. Finally, note for the rest of us how many more castle slots were required to do that; to get from 100 ft/lb to 180.

That way, people could torque to 100 ft/lb, note the position of one set of castle slots, and then continue to tighten with a breaker bar until the correct number of castle slots had been passed, before inserting the cotter pin.

That wouldn't yield an exact 180 ft/lb every time, but it would be a whole lot closer than guessing over 100 ft/lb. ;) :cool: BP

52 Ragtop
08-17-2014, 07:13 PM
That's why I have gone to Fairborn Axles on my Avanti!

Jim

Warren Webb
08-17-2014, 10:24 PM
I bought a 3/4" torque wrench just to do the rear axle nuts. I think it was cheap insurance, only set me back $60. It goes to 300 lbs so as the book says when I reach 180, then I go to the next castle opening, insert the cottier pin & done.

Bullet
08-17-2014, 10:31 PM
So I have to ask what is the difference between the Fairborn axles and the Studebaker West Axles. I know S.W. are from the old Steve Allen inventory and Fairborn's are from Mosier, but is there really a difference, I think both are $500 a pair. Inquiring minds.

Thanks

Mark

blackhawk61
08-17-2014, 10:38 PM
So I have to ask what is the difference between the Fairborn axles and the Studebaker West Axles. I know S.W. are from the old Steve Allen inventory and Fairborn's are from Mosier, but is there really a difference, I think both are $500 a pair. Inquiring minds.

Thanks

Mark

Fairborns are the ones that Ted Harbit had made

nels
08-18-2014, 10:58 AM
I've noticed that whenever an axle breaks it's always on the left or the drivers side? Also, over tightening the nut splits the flange. I believe the interface between hub and axle relies on a morse taper type grip. The steel key is just a security device but might actually start the failure. Some guys recommend a brass key and they might be right. The absolute best cure is flanged axles. Studebaker realized this and were in process of changing over as noticed with the Canadian production.

Roscomacaw
08-18-2014, 02:19 PM
Fairborns are the ones that Ted Harbit had made

I'm just guessing here, but if there ARE brand new flanged axles that aren't of those pioneered by Ted Harbit, then they're likely NOS ones from late Studebaker production. I didn't think any of those original flanged shafts were still to be had, but maybe that's the case. Rich???

StudeRich
08-18-2014, 02:44 PM
You know Bob, I am not ABSOLUTELY sure either, but there are still '65-'66 Axle Shafts in S.B. stock the last I knew, but remember those are NOT conversion Kits like Fairborn Studebaker sells, they require no Hub Drums, a different Axle Housing, different driveshaft Yoke the whole Nine.

Whereas the "Kits" require some Mods and are not "bolt-in". I am quite sure there would not be remaining stock in any quantity of more than (1) of the Special Paxton R3 axle assemblies with a sealed Packard Wheel Bearing available either.

I do not know if Studebakers West has some Frost and French West Coast Warehouse '65-'66 type Axles like S.I. has or not, or if they got some Fairborn Stock from Steven Allen, or IF Steve had his own, maybe Moser Axle Kits made?

I guess someone could ask Carl Thoms if he wishes to share that info, but the go-to source for conversion "KITS" has always been Fairborn since Ted sold it.

Jessie J.
08-18-2014, 05:58 PM
I've noticed that whenever an axle breaks it's always on the left or the drivers side? Also, over tightening the nut splits the flange. I believe the interface between hub and axle relies on a morse taper type grip. The steel key is just a security device but might actually start the failure. Some guys recommend a brass key and they might be right. The absolute best cure is flanged axles. Studebaker realized this and were in process of changing over as noticed with the Canadian production.
Over the years, and under hard driving I have at different times experienced axle breakages on BOTH sides. The last one literally turned the -passenger- rear quarter inside out. :(
Nothing in any of these breakages was indicative of any problems at all with the axle keys, which were in each case intact and still firmly seated within the hubs.
The breakages were on the thick axle shaft portions where the axle entered into the hub, next to the bearings, and well inboard of the keyed area. The break being through the thick diameter of the axle, with the broken ends presenting a crystalline appearance.
This has been experienced and been discussed in this Forum for years (in posts by Ted, and others now so old they are no longer accessible)
The problem seems to be in the design, material or heat treatment batch related. With some axles having shown capable of standing up to unbelievable amounts of abuse (notably Ted's early dragstrip exploits) while others have broken while in daily driving use behind a 259.
My view, and I pressed for it in this Forum with my personal 'horror stories' long before they became available, is that aftermarket flanged axles are cheap insurance for any Studebaker.

RDWEAVER
08-18-2014, 08:10 PM
Over the years, and under hard driving I have at different times experienced axle breakages on BOTH sides. The last one literally turned the -passenger- rear quarter inside out. :(
Nothing in any of these breakages was indicative of any problems at all with the axle keys, which were in each case intact and still firmly seated within the hubs.
The breakages were on the thick axle shaft portions where the axle entered into the hub, next to the bearings, and well inboard of the keyed area. The break being through the thick diameter of the axle, with the broken ends presenting a crystalline appearance.
This has been experienced and been discussed in this Forum for years (in posts by Ted, and others now so old they are no longer accessible)
The problem seems to be in the design, material or heat treatment batch related. With some axles having shown capable of standing up to unbelievable amounts of abuse (notably Ted's early dragstrip exploits) while others have broken while in daily driving use behind a 259.
My view, and I pressed for it in this Forum with my personal 'horror stories' long before they became available, is that aftermarket flanged axles are cheap insurance for any Studebaker.
Yes I agree with you Jessie J... Mine broke well inboard of the keyed area as well. The old part of the break had broken long enough to discolor and darken. The axles were carefully inspected at the time of assembly and the crack was not noticed then but almost certainly was there. Hence the need for magnafluxing. Or better yet get rid of em! Contrary to what some of the forum members think, I am convinced this had nothing to do with hub key installation, torque values or lubrication. The car never did (never will) do a doughnut on pavement. I own the 3 complete manuals and use them. Don't get me wrong you guys, I can take constructive criticism when it is warranted and will welcome it then. I don't really think it's necessary now. This could have been worse for me than the faulty ignition switch that was on the news a couple of months ago. I posted this with the intent of driving home the fact that now, I also agree flanged axles may be required for safety. Hopefully there is somebody out there that can learn from this post. That said, anyone who is considering rebuilding a Dana 44 should seriously consider upgrading the axles.

nels
08-18-2014, 11:21 PM
If anything should concern you about driving a studebaker it is the rear axles. When they break, and they do, you lose the wheel and drum assy, you lose all braking with single master cylinder, emergency brake doesn't do anything, and you cannot down shift to slow down....you are just screwed. Very scary feeling, I've been there! Flanged axle investment is on par with seat belts.

jackb
08-19-2014, 08:43 AM
....any evidence of old, flanged axle failures anywhere in the system ?

Alan
08-19-2014, 11:21 AM
The flanged axles break too. But it is at the edge of the splines. So you have a stub about 1 1/2" long inside the carrier that you have to remove, but the wheel and drum are retained. Don't ask me how I know that.

avantibngrant
08-19-2014, 11:46 AM
About 10 or 12 years ago I had this happen to a 81 AMC eagle. I found a used axle and drove it a long time after. Great car with the 258 engine. Left side too that broke. Makes one wonder if the 6 cylinder engines with the rear low ratio say 4.56 rear ends might fatigue like that also. In my spare time I think i will do a calculation as to what the torque would be for full motor torque ratioed to the axle with the weight of the car added and see what the it woud come to vs the endurance limit say for 1045 steel unless anyone know for certain what the steel used is. I could also work from the resistance of the wheel to spinning with say a coefficent of traction of .75 or so. This would be independent of ratio and power, just on torque to spin the wheel on pavement. What is the diameter of the axle if someone has a loose one?
Regards

Neil

Mike Van Veghten
08-19-2014, 01:07 PM
Having flanged axles is NO guarentee that it won't break between the flange and the bearing. Ask me how I know..!
During "normal" driving/ cornering, etc. conditions, that area between the flange and the bearing is the area with the higest stress on the entire axle.
Not counting snapping the clutch out...!

Mike

Dan Timberlake
08-19-2014, 08:04 PM
Just going down the road accumulates about 900 revolutions per mile, loaded by the weight of the car.
It's a perfect "full reversed bending" endurance test machine.
By the time I've gone just 1200 miles the axles have rotated over 1 million times.
"Fatigue" or "endurance" testing often involves testing a part for 1 to 10 million cycles, as it takes millions of cycles to make a part fail if it designed so the stress levels are near the material's endurance limit. A goal is often to have the operating stress BELOW the endurance limit, which should result in an infinite life.
One thing that can spoil those infinite life plans is degradation of the surface finish in a highly loaded region. Solid performing premium materials or even movIe star materials LIKE " chrOmE mOLY" have their lovely high endurance limits reduced to cabbage patch levels if the surface is rusted or marred by fretting.
page 82 here -
http://timkensteel.com/~/media/Files/Practical-Data-For-Metallurgists-TimkenSteel.ashx

Of course knicks or sharpacorners, even in keyways, can raise the stress 3X or more above the "nominal" values.

Bottom line, taking corners and accelerating at 0.3 gs increases the bending or torsional stress relatively briefly, but an axle's daily life accumulates bending stress cycles faster than a miser collects pennies.

Pictures of the fracture surfaces could provide clues where the crack initiated, which could be useful pointing to where magnaflux techs should look especially close, and also suggesting practical detail improvements that could increase time-to-cracking 10X or more.

Chicken Hawk
08-19-2014, 08:31 PM
....any evidence of old, flanged axle failures anywhere in the system ?

I didn't break one but when I replaced the ring and pinion about a year ago, I found the left axle had the splines twisted slightly. This was in the Tomato after many many 3500 rpm launches. After finding this the ones in the Wrapper were checked and they are fine but it has not had nearly as many quarter mile runs as the Tomato. I'm sure if the Tomato had been an automatic it would not have happened.

I would put them in my daughter's '63 Cruiser but I already have the flanged ones in it. I think they would last forever in a normally driven street car.

Ted

JoeHall
08-19-2014, 08:52 PM
Obviously a broken axle at road speed would be catastrophic, and I certainly do not want to have that experience. But I cannot understand what makes a flanged axle less prone to failure than a tapered axle, if the hub is installed correctly on the tapered one.

Given the above accounts of tapered axle failure usually at a point where the taper & hub connection is a non-issue, and the accounts of flanged axle failures too, what makes a flanged axle safer than a tapered axle??? I absolutely agree magnifluxing both types is a very good idea. But its gonna take some convincing before I am ready to bite the bullet for flanged axles in three Studes, though I am willing to learn.

Thanks

11SecAvanti
08-20-2014, 07:09 AM
Do not over look the safety value of balanced tires and rims on these axles. The rims must rotate with out runout and the wheels and tires need a quality balance. The axles need to run true and not wobble.

Jessie J.
08-20-2014, 07:45 AM
The price of installing flanged axles can be much cheaper than the results of experiencing a broken one at an inopportune time.

My first Stude axle failure was when the right rear wheel departed company while making a left turn at the base of a blind hill _in the rain _ with my wife and two children on board. I had to exit the vehicle, run up the hill and frantically wave down the oncoming traffic.

We remain free to make a cheap choice, or to place a bet deciding to take an unneeded risk, and may get away with it. But the costs of losing that bet can well be incalculable.

I have little doubt that Studebaker would have eventually been subjected to a government Safety Recall in this matter.
Ask yourself, if Studebaker had issued a Safety Recall, and had offered free axle replacement, would you have refused to have your vehicle(s) serviced?

The Company is long gone. The responsibility to address and correct such known and documented risks now rests entirely with us, the present vehicle owners and operators, and SDC's representatives.
Ted has done his part, and seen to it that safer axle shafts are now available. It is our individual responsibility to now do our part.

avantibngrant
08-20-2014, 09:58 AM
Anyone know what material the flanged and the original ones are made from? The material may be better in the new ones if the geometry is the same at the break point which is likely beside/at the bearing where the bending moment is the greatest.

Neil

JLB
08-20-2014, 10:05 AM
First hand experience with this problem. In 1975 I lived in Dallas Texas and was driving on the Dallas North Toll Road at about 60 - 65 MPH in my '63 Avanti. The right axle broke off and the wheel ,brake drum etc. somehow came out from the fender/wheelwell area and rolled to the grassy right of way area to the right.I managed to steer to the easement on the right side of the road, but there were no brakes. Happened very fast, with no warning and luckily I got off the road without involving anyone else.Driving behind me was a State Patrol car. He stopped and described what he saw, as being Spectacular!...........a shower of sparks as the car was "riding" on the Leaf Spring U Bolts, and the shock mount plate.He also described the "flight" of the wheel as it exited the wheelwell and bounced along the right of way. I would describes it as exhilarating and memorable...........kinda like the first time you jump out of an airplane .
Yes,today I have Fairborn flanged axles, as I do not want to experience that failure again.

Chicken Hawk
08-20-2014, 11:51 AM
[QUOTE=Jessie J
Ted has done his part, and seen to it that safer axle shafts are now available. It is our individual responsibility to now do our part.[/QUOTE]

Need to make a correction. Yes, I was involved with getting these flanged axles made but with two other fellows; Malcolm Berry and Phil Harris. Malcolm did most of the leg work and working with Moser to get them done. Malcolm is responsible for getting them made and Phil sells them for Malcolm. I got out of it when sold my parts business to Phil.

Ted

avantibngrant
08-20-2014, 02:23 PM
Need to make a correction. Yes, I was involved with getting these flanged axles made but with two other fellows; Malcolm Berry and Phil Harris. Malcolm did most of the leg work and working with Moser to get them done. Malcolm is responsible for getting them made and Phil sells them for Malcolm. I got out of it when sold my parts business to Phil.

Ted
Ted would you know what the grade and hardness of steel that was used? I see some advertised for Jeeps made from 4340 tool steel. Would you know if it is better than the original used in the tapered ones?

Regards

Neil

JoeHall
08-20-2014, 03:32 PM
Need to make a correction. Yes, I was involved with getting these flanged axles made but with two other fellows; Malcolm Berry and Phil Harris. Malcolm did most of the leg work and working with Moser to get them done. Malcolm is responsible for getting them made and Phil sells them for Malcolm. I got out of it when sold my parts business to Phil.

Ted
Just wondering Ted, who steered you to Moser, as a resource for custom made flanged axles in the first place? :o

BobPalma
08-20-2014, 03:49 PM
Just wondering Ted, who steered you to Moser, as a resource for custom made flanged axles in the first place? :o

Not Ted, but realistically, Joe; Moser Engineering is barely 40 miles from Ted's house. Muncie Dragway is sort of between Ted's and Moser's, and Moser is a common household word at Muncie among the racers. :cool: BP

JoeHall
08-20-2014, 03:54 PM
Not Ted, but realistically, Joe; Moser Engineering is barely 40 miles from Ted's house. Muncie Dragway is sort of between Ted's and Moser's, and Moser is a common household word at Muncie among the racers. :cool: BP
Yep I am aware of that, but still interested in Ted's answer to the question ;)

Chicken Hawk
08-20-2014, 09:45 PM
Just wondering Ted, who steered you to Moser, as a resource for custom made flanged axles in the first place? :o

I had already used Moser axles in the '51. And as Bob mentioned, Moser is a common name at the Muncie strip where I ran (run) most of the time and I would venture to say probably 95% or more racers run their axles. Muncie Dragway is about 30 mile east of me and Moser is about 20 mile on east of Muncie.

After many runs on those axles, I did twist one. When it twisted the car started hopping badly and it took me a little while to discover why it started hopping. When I finally jacked the rear end up and ran it in gear, I could see the wheel wobble some and strangely caused the hopping. I wasn't sure that was the cause until I put in a new axle.

The '51 had a LOT more hp than the Tomato but was an automatic so along with that and slicks with flexible side walls contributed to the axle lasting as long as it did. Richard Poe just told me a few days ago that the Drag Radials are actually harder on gears than slicks due to the Radials having stiff sidewalls and therefore, putting more of a shock on the gears than the slicks.

On the grade of steel in the Moser axles I do not know but maybe if you call or emai Malcolm, he might be able to tell you.

Ted

JoeHall
08-20-2014, 10:04 PM
I had already used Moser axles in the '51. And as Bob mentioned, Moser is a common name at the Muncie strip where I ran (run) most of the time and I would venture to say probably 95% or more racers run their axles. Muncie Dragway is about 30 mile east of me and Moser is about 20 mile on east of Muncie.

After many runs on those axles, I did twist one. When it twisted the car started hopping badly and it took me a little while to discover why it started hopping. When I finally jacked the rear end up and ran it in gear, I could see the wheel wobble some and strangely caused the hopping. I wasn't sure that was the cause until I put in a new axle.

The '51 had a LOT more hp than the Tomato but was an automatic so along with that and slicks with flexible side walls contributed to the axle lasting as long as it did. Richard Poe just told me a few days ago that the Drag Radials are actually harder on gears than slicks due to the Radials having stiff sidewalls and therefore, putting more of a shock on the gears than the slicks.

On the grade of steel in the Moser axles I do not know but maybe if you call or emai Malcolm, he might be able to tell you.

Ted
Thanks Ted,
But when did you begin using Moser FLANGED axles?
Joe

jackb
08-21-2014, 11:45 AM
......so it sounds like for the best insurance, brand new replacement flanged axles sets "IF" the metallurgy specs stand up......yet to read or hear of what an aftermarket part specs for cars that drive ~1000 miles per year require from the re-pop folk..... All I know is re-popped stuff, here on this forum, and around my circles doesn't always mean "new and improved"......

JoeHall
08-21-2014, 12:35 PM
......so it sounds like for the best insurance, brand new replacement flanged axles sets "IF" the metallurgy specs stand up......yet to read or hear of what an aftermarket part specs for cars that drive ~1000 miles per year require from the re-pop folk..... All I know is re-popped stuff, here on this forum, and around my circles doesn't always mean "new and improved"......
Unless Ted says different, I am pretty sure Moser flanged axles for Studebakers did not come on scene till around ten years ago. So failure data may be limited, other than the one Ted twisted a couple of years ago (if that even counts).

As for Moser metallurgy, a little over 10 years ago, I had them custom make a pair of flanged axles for an AM-20 (AMC) rear end I put under a 56J, behind a TH400 transmission. The AM-20 is very similar to the Stude tapered axle & hub setup. In the several phon-cons with the Moser engineer, he convinced me the metallurgy was modern and more than up to the task.

Those axles worked great under the 56J, and I bragged about them everywhere I went in that car (41,000 miles before I sold it). I mentioned them to Ted in casual conversation up in Indiana, and he immediately wanted to know where I had gotten them made. I answered Moser, and he expressed surprise; said he'd tried to get Moser to custom make flanged axles for Studes several times but they were not interested. I speculated maybe a new crew was on board, and gave him the name and number of the guy I had worked with there; a few months later, the Moser flanged axle kits came out for Studebakers.

I trust Moser is using the same metal they put in the AMC axles for me, if so they ought to be OK, but it might bear checking with them.

RadioRoy
08-21-2014, 01:15 PM
All I know is re-popped stuff, here on this forum, and around my circles doesn't always mean "new and improved"......

Amen to that, brother!

StudeRich
08-21-2014, 01:25 PM
Joe, I take it that those AMC AM-20 Axles were not the ones they splined to the Drum! That was a disaster waiting to happen! :( :ohmy:

JoeHall
08-21-2014, 02:17 PM
Joe, I take it that those AMC AM-20 Axles were not the ones they splined to the Drum! That was a disaster waiting to happen! :( :ohmy:
Actually it was a little better than Studes' tapered setup, since the hub was not swedged to the drum. The drum simply slipped on over the studs, like the later, Stude flanged axles setups do; this allows for easier servicing of the brakes. The axle, instead of tapered with slot and key, was splined all the way around. New hubs came "blank" without splines, and the axles cut the splines into the hub upon first installation. The hub could be removed and installed same as a Stude, except the Stude has the drum swedged onto the hub.

The flanged axles did away with all that though.

Chicken Hawk
08-21-2014, 02:41 PM
Thanks Ted,
But when did you begin using Moser FLANGED axles?
Joe

If you mean in the '51 it must have been around the 1990 era, I really don't remember exactly. In the Tomato around 2005.

Ted

Mikado282
08-23-2014, 08:33 PM
The price of installing flanged axles can be much cheaper than the results of experiencing a broken one at an inopportune time.

My first Stude axle failure was when the right rear wheel departed company while making a left turn at the base of a blind hill _in the rain _ with my wife and two children on board. I had to exit the vehicle, run up the hill and frantically wave down the oncoming traffic.

We remain free to make a cheap choice, or to place a bet deciding to take an unneeded risk, and may get away with it. But the costs of losing that bet can well be incalculable.

I have little doubt that Studebaker would have eventually been subjected to a government Safety Recall in this matter.
Ask yourself, if Studebaker had issued a Safety Recall, and had offered free axle replacement, would you have refused to have your vehicle(s) serviced?

The Company is long gone. The responsibility to address and correct such known and documented risks now rests entirely with us, the present vehicle owners and operators, and SDC's representatives.
Ted has done his part, and seen to it that safer axle shafts are now available. It is our individual responsibility to now do our part.

Wait until some tort hungry lawyer takes a case with an accident caused by a broken tapered axle. All he has to do is find this thread and your goose is cooked. Another side affect is that insurance companies would refuse to insure your cars or would do so at a cost you could not afford. All it takes is one case and you are all screwed. I don't wish this upon anyone but today's realities suck

57pack
08-23-2014, 08:47 PM
Sorry to hear of this accident! Glad you weren't hurt or anyone else.
You were indeed lucky your Hawk wasn't seriously damaged by this wheel lost.
Have to say yours is a very good looking Hawk.
I was towing a friends boat years ago and while crossing the Delaware Memorial Bridge, the boat trailer
lost a wheel and tire. Bounced around a bit and came to rest in the
grill and radiator of a new Volvo. Not a good day.

DemonSpeedn
08-23-2014, 10:54 PM
If you have your rear end apart for bearings and seals a careful inspection of the axles is not enough. Find a shop that can use some sort of process to crack check them. 37094

Ugh, that is horrible!! Sorry you had to go through that. I removed my old rear from my 1959 stude lark, and in doing so, realized the axle was cracked in the threads. That same thing could have happened to me. I hope everyone was okay.

Jessie J.
08-24-2014, 08:52 AM
Wait until some tort hungry lawyer takes a case with an accident caused by a broken tapered axle. All he has to do is find this thread and your goose is cooked. Another side affect is that insurance companies would refuse to insure your cars or would do so at a cost you could not afford. All it takes is one case and you are all screwed. I don't wish this upon anyone but today's realities suck
It has been my observation that most of the Studebakers still being operated on public roads are relatively nice condition, or 'restored', fully paid for 'toys' of the owners. Some not having had to make a payment or substantial repair on their Studebaker in a decade or more. It wouldn't kill or bankrupt these owners to step up to the plate and get this problem resolved.
SDC should be admitting that a known, documented problem with these axles exists, and encouraging every owner to bear the responsibility of seeing to it that their vehicles are as safe to operate as is practicable.

sweetolbob
08-24-2014, 08:58 AM
The good thing about a product by Moser is that axles are a predominate part of their business. I would guess that anything purchased from them is high quality and quite new technology. Their products handle a lot of applications more demanding than Studebakers. I've used them in the past and currently have a set of theirs in my 54K which were custom built by Moser when I narrowed the GM axle.

14x7
08-24-2014, 09:32 AM
So is Moser making flange axles for the Dana 44 or Dana 27? Would like an answer to this ! If I can keep the Dana 27 , that would be nice . 55 2 dr presdent

Kato
08-24-2014, 09:40 PM
I am considering buying a 62 GT Hawk which has had the tapered axles replaced with the flanged axles. I did not fully appreciate how beneficial that is until I read this post so thanks for bringing this to the attention of those of us learning Studebaker!

Bordeaux Daytona
08-25-2014, 07:58 AM
So is Moser making flange axles for the Dana 44 or Dana 27? Would like an answer to this ! If I can keep the Dana 27 , that would be nice . 55 2 dr presdent

I think only 44s. It would be nice if there were replacements for the 27. Not everybody can justify an upgrade to a 44 especially if they only have a six.