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SwearingEmu
01-23-2014, 10:42 AM
Hi my name is Nate. And the story goes like this a small town about 2 hrs from where I live I own a business. And I saw the headlight of this vehicle and took the following pics. Best I can tell its a '57 or '58 according to the big fins. Turns out the guy died that owned this car and its been sitting for 40+ yrs. All the trim is there and glass and without looking in closer the body looks straight as well. Not sure if its a golden hawk or silver hawk? On the side it says Studebaker and then has the V8 emblem below that. And the badge on the grill what does that mean? Is this car worth pursing to buy and does it hold any value? And roughly what is its value in the current shape? I am seeking any possible info or ideas you have, thanks! How much is too much to pay for this car?

Roscomacaw
01-23-2014, 11:18 AM
We'd need MUCH better photos to identify it or guess at a value. Are you SURE there's a "V8" emblem there? If there is, it's not original. If you can, raise the hood up (pull it towards you as you do or you can bend the back corners of it!) and give us the two lines of digits on a tag that's to the right (passenger's side) of the windshield wiper motor. That'll reveal exactly what it is.

candbstudebakers
01-23-2014, 11:18 AM
From the pictures it looks to be a silver hawk 1957, worth hard to say with out more pictures and info, how much rust if any ? floors and trunk fenders look good , does the engine turn ? if stuck lowers the prices parts car not rusted apart $500.00 good interior, good body, engine not stuck, maybe $3000.00 stick or Auto? if Auto and not working also lowers the price. good luck.

SwearingEmu
01-23-2014, 11:29 AM
Don't have any more pics in a garage of an abandoned house. The time I took these pics cops showed up and thought I was trying to steal something. Yeah and I'm sure the V8 emblem is there right below that's what confused me. Couldn't find one on the net like it. Didn't know if this car was worth flopping or not? Wouldn't be able to see if there is rust unless I bought the car. Just didn't know if it was worth the risk?

plwindish
01-23-2014, 11:47 AM
The Hawk emblem covered with 40 years worth of dust might be mistaken for a V8 emblem until all the crap is cleaned off and one can make out the bird.

studegary
01-23-2014, 12:13 PM
Welcome!
It is not any year of Golden Hawk.
My best guess is that it is a 1957 Silver Hawk.
If you can buy it for $500, or less, you will make out okay if the car is not that good and you just sell the hood and fenders and scrap the rest. If the car is better than that, it is a win for you.

Roscomacaw
01-23-2014, 12:28 PM
There's potentially WAY more of value than just the hood and fenders. There's a fella right here on the forums that's looking for a Hawk front fender as of today

bezhawk
01-23-2014, 12:52 PM
I would find the owner and get permission before even stepping on ANY PRIVATE PROPERTY...........E V E R!!!!! That's a good way to get shot, or arrested, especially in Texas.
Even if the place is abandoned, someone owns the property. It it ain't yours don't touch! It's called trespassing.

Find a neighbor that knows something. Go to the county courthouse and look up the owner of the property. Do it right, legal ,and with proper respect for property owners rights


end of rant

studegary
01-23-2014, 12:54 PM
There's potentially WAY more of value than just the hood and fenders. There's a fella right here on the forums that's looking for a Hawk front fender as of today

I agree with the "potentially" part. I figure that the $500 is a good starting point. As you know, to recoup any money, he will have to haul the car, clean it, remove the parts, market them, ship them, etc.

52 Ragtop
01-23-2014, 02:00 PM
I would find the owner and get permission before even stepping on ANY PRIVATE PROPERTY...........E V E R!!!!! That's a good way to get shot, or arrested, especially in Texas.
Even if the place is abandoned, someone owns the property. It it ain't yours don't touch! It's called trespassing.

Find a neighbor that knows something. Go to the county courthouse and look up the owner of the property. Do it right, legal ,and with proper respect for property owners rights


end of rant

Brad,
GOOD Suggestion! Somebody is or owes proprty taxes and the county courthouse would have those records.

Even if you found the next of kin.

Jim

Roscomacaw
01-23-2014, 02:37 PM
Well, Mr. Emu has told us the PO is dead. That tells me he's gotten SOME info from SOME place - maybe the cops knew - especially if it's a small town. But yeah.... don't trespass even for the bestest of reasons! Especially in gun-luvin' Texas.

Heh - talk about bein' pissed at a trespasser..... I was coming home from town some years back, and I saw a truck of a friend coming towards me from my place. I slowed to a stop and the truck did too. At the wheel was my "friend", and next to him set a fella I'd never seen before. My friend introduces us and the stranger pipes up: "Hey, I left ya 50 bucks in yur mailbox. We came and removed a pair of brake drums and I figured $50 was a fair price for them. I'm pressed for time and didn't know when you'd be home, so I just took what I needed!"
I was LIVID at this "theft" and told them so. If this friend of mine hadn't led me to some good finds, I'd have called the cops on them. As it was, I gave him a piece of my mind the next time I saw him.

52hawk
01-23-2014, 03:32 PM
Wow! That took guts,Rosco.I'd have been real tempted to call the cops! Was $50 a fair price??
Any way,in the fourth pic you can see there is no Golden hawk scoop on the hood,and you can see the post on door and rear quarter= Silver Hawk.

SwearingEmu
01-23-2014, 03:41 PM
Yeah I found out who pay the taxes its the next door neighbor. And the sons of the old gentleman live close to me within an hr or so. I'm going to try and get some more info on the car and will keep ya'll posted. And there is a scoop on the hood cause I peeked in just didn't get the pic. Also there is ornaments on the front fenders. Thanks for all the replies!

wolfie
01-23-2014, 04:04 PM
Yeah I found out who pay the taxes its the next door neighbor. And the sons of the old gentleman live close to me within an hr or so. I'm going to try and get some more info on the car and will keep ya'll posted. And there is a scoop on the hood cause I peeked in just didn't get the pic. Also there is ornaments on the front fenders. Thanks for all the replies!

The scoop they are refering to is not on the hood in the pics. And it is a "C" body not a "K" body so it is not a Golden Hawk. Steve

SwearingEmu
01-23-2014, 06:13 PM
So wolfie is the car worth anything? As a silver hawk? How much is too much to pay or would you even pursue buying the car?

StudeDave57
01-23-2014, 06:33 PM
Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I was always under the impression that the Crossed flags/V8 emblem on a Silver Hawk front fender told you there is a 289 under it's hood.

I am assuming this to be a Silver Hawk because Golden Hawks had a bird in that spot.




StudeDave '57 :cool:

SN-60
01-23-2014, 06:44 PM
I have the crossed flags/V8 emblem on the deck lid of My '83 Avanti....and it DEFINITELY doesn't have a 289 under its hood!;)

StudeDave57
01-23-2014, 06:59 PM
I have the crossed flags/V8 emblem on the deck lid of My '83 Avanti....and it DEFINITELY doesn't have a 289 under its hood!;)
Well- since it's not a 1957 Silver Hawk, or even a Studebaker, all bets are off. :yeahright:

But hey- didn't Mustang frames get used on Avantis at some point?
Maybe yours is a 'prototype' of some sort, and you have a Ford 289... :whome:




StudeDave '57 :cool:

wolfie
01-23-2014, 10:19 PM
So wolfie is the car worth anything? As a silver hawk? How much is too much to pay or would you even pursue buying the car?


As others stated it does have some value dependant upon condition. Not as valued as a Golden Hawk but also a good bit cheaper to restore/maintain (no supercharger). Even the 6 cylinder Hawk bodies have value if they are straight and solid. At $500 or so I would grab it up, at $3500-4500 it would have to pass most points of a thorough inspection. If it is easy to contact the owners I would pursue it and see what they say. As others have stated though, I would follow proper protocol. Having had 3 vehicles and several thousand dollars in parts and tools stolen recently I personally would be inclined to shoot then question anyone poking around in my garage. Steve

SwearingEmu
01-24-2014, 07:26 AM
Man this has been really helpful. Now what does the badge on the front grille indicate? Also it has ornaments on both of the front fenders? I know the pics don't show...but what are these?

62champ
01-24-2014, 08:00 AM
The emblem in the grill is the Studebaker crest:

http://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large/1957-studebaker-golden-hawk-emblem-jill-reger.jpg

and here is a 3/4 side view of a '57 Silver Hawk: (with no guarantee car shown in 100% correct.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dd/1957_Studebaker_Silver_Hawk.jpg

If the car has been laying in the dirt for 40 years, while the parts you can see might look decent, it might have turned into a mouse hotel and everything you cannot see could be rusted away to almost nothing. Good call on at least seeing if it is something that can be saved.

Good luck.

Washtubman
01-24-2014, 08:22 AM
I would definitely pursue it. What it's worth, with the info provided, can't be determined. But, you may have a true "Barn Find". If the car has been in Texas all it's life, I wouldn't think rust would be too much of a problem. As others have said, if you can get it cheap enough and it's not restorable, you can probably make some money on some of the parts. Good Luck and keep us posted.

SwearingEmu
01-24-2014, 09:09 AM
Yeah the red car in the pic looks just like it! I will keep everyone posted thanks for the help!

studegary
01-24-2014, 04:58 PM
I have the crossed flags/V8 emblem on the deck lid of My '83 Avanti....and it DEFINITELY doesn't have a 289 under its hood!;)

Why would you post the fact that you added a Studebaker emblem to your Avanti in a post by a newbee that is trying to learn?

I will stick with my earlier answer of 1957 Silver Hawk and $500.

studegary
01-24-2014, 05:00 PM
Well- since it's not a 1957 Silver Hawk, or even a Studebaker, all bets are off. :yeahright:

But hey- didn't Mustang frames get used on Avantis at some point?
Maybe yours is a 'prototype' of some sort, and you have a Ford 289... :whome:




StudeDave '57 :cool:

Avantis were not Ford Mustang based until the 2005-2007 models.

Guido
01-25-2014, 11:08 AM
There has been a 1957 Golden Hawk listed intermittently on the Louisville Craigslist for the past couple of years priced at $250,000.00, this car could be a gold mine waiting to happen...

http://louisville.craigslist.org/cto/4287953702.html

SN-60
01-25-2014, 11:17 AM
There has been a 1957 Golden Hawk listed intermittently on the Louisville Craigslist for the past couple of years priced at $250,000.00, this car could be a gold mine waiting to happen...

http://louisville.craigslist.org/cto/4287953702.html

Wow!!...a QUARTER MILLION DOLLARS???......Hard for Me to believe that I once bought a fairly nice 1957 Studebaker Golden Hawk (sans supercharger) off of a local guy for FIFTEEN DOLLARS!!!!

62champ
01-25-2014, 01:06 PM
There has been a 1957 Golden Hawk listed intermittently on the Louisville Craigslist for the past couple of years priced at $250,000.00, this car could be a gold mine waiting to happen...

http://louisville.craigslist.org/cto/4287953702.html

I was thinking he might have accidentally hit the "zero" key one too many times, but he says it in the ad as well - it might be another 25 years before they get to that level...

SN-60
01-25-2014, 01:35 PM
Values of actual Studebaker Golden Hawks (and the Packard Hawk) have certainly soared over the last five years! Model for model, all in similar condition, I'd say the breakdown in prices would go this way: Most expensive to purchase today... 1st 1958 Packard Hawk, #2 1957 Golden Hawk, #3 1956 Golden Hawk, and #4 1958 Golden Hawk.

bezhawk
01-25-2014, 03:05 PM
Values of actual Studebaker Golden Hawks (and the Packard Hawk) have certainly soared over the last five years! Model for model, all in similar condition, I'd say the breakdown in prices would go this way: Most expensive to purchase today... 1st 1958 Packard Hawk, #2 1957 Golden Hawk, #3 1956 Golden Hawk, and #4 1958 Golden Hawk.
I agree, but it should be the 58 as #2, because it's a better car than the 57. Better interior, anti sway bars, springs, transmission, driveshaft, and more.

SN-60
01-25-2014, 03:28 PM
Disagree with Your value assessment Bez. Mechanically superior it may be, but the '58 Golden Hawk has always been 'The Forgotten Stepsister' to the '57 Golden. And, in My opinion the '57 version had nicer interiors and more pleasing exterior paint schemes. By the way NO year Studebaker Golden Hawk came with a rear sway bar as standard equipment.:(

SN-60
01-25-2014, 03:32 PM
I would also add that the 1955 Studebaker President Speedster, being the forerunner of the Golden Hawk series, and so similar to them, would 'piggy back' with the '57 Golden for the #2 position.

Guido
01-25-2014, 04:38 PM
I was thinking he might have accidentally hit the "zero" key one too many times, but he says it in the ad as well - it might be another 25 years before they get to that level...

That was my first thought the first time I saw his ad, I guess the verbiage about calls only is to keep people from sending him messages telling him how far off base he is on value. I ought to call him to see what makes his car so valuable.

SN-60
01-25-2014, 05:06 PM
The more I consider it, IS the '58 Golden Hawk really mechanically superior to the '57? (as Bez says) Certainly Studebaker saved money by simplifying the frame and the driveline....but did those changes really make for a mechanically superior automobile? One thing is for certain....Both the '57 and the '58 Golden Hawks ARE mechanically superior to the original 1956 Golden Hawk.

bezhawk
01-25-2014, 06:37 PM
The more I consider it, IS the '58 Golden Hawk really mechanically superior to the '57? (as Bez says) Certainly Studebaker saved money by simplifying the frame and the driveline....but did those changes really make for a mechanically superior automobile? One thing is for certain....Both the '57 and the '58 Golden Hawks ARE mechanically superior to the original 1956 Golden Hawk.
The one piece driveshaft was superior. The FRONT anti sway bar was far far superior and the way it was attached to the frame instead of the "A" arms. The asymmetrical rear springs helped wheel hop and braking. You're wrong on the 58 having poorer interior, but that is judgemental, the 56 was superior of all of them, except the 400's and Packard Hawk.Here is a 5831757and here is a gaudy metallic 5731758

R3 challenger
01-25-2014, 07:53 PM
In general, I agree that the '57 GH will usually bring more money than a '58. But the handling of a '58 was definitely better because of several factors, especially the larger diameter front stabilizer bar along with its better mounting setup. The routing of the gas line was also better on the '58. It went under the pressure box and entered the box on the right side, going directly to the carb. The '57 GH gas line went to the left side of the box. Inside the box, there was a short gas line extension with fittings on both ends to get the gas to the right side of the carb. That made more points for possible leaks, two more fittings, and several additional bends/corners for the gas to go through on a '57.

George

8E45E
01-25-2014, 08:01 PM
I was coming home from town some years back, and I saw a truck of a friend coming towards me from my place. I slowed to a stop and the truck did too. At the wheel was my "friend", and next to him set a fella I'd never seen before. My friend introduces us and the stranger pipes up: "Hey, I left ya 50 bucks in yur mailbox. We came and removed a pair of brake drums and I figured $50 was a fair price for them. I'm pressed for time and didn't know when you'd be home, so I just took what I needed!"
I was LIVID at this "theft" and told them so. If this friend of mine hadn't led me to some good finds, I'd have called the cops on them. As it was, I gave him a piece of my mind the next time I saw him.

Why didn't you take the drums back right there on the spot, and told him they weren't for sale? And if he wanted his money back, he could have followed you back home.

Craig

SN-60
01-25-2014, 11:44 PM
The one piece driveshaft was superior. The FRONT anti sway bar was far far superior and the way it was attached to the frame instead of the "A" arms. The asymmetrical rear springs helped wheel hop and braking. You're wrong on the 58 having poorer interior, but that is judgemental, the 56 was superior of all of them, except the 400's and Packard Hawk.Here is a 5831757and here is a gaudy metallic 5731758

The improved mounting of the sway bar in '58 WAS a definite plus....Everything else that You mention? Well, like You said about the '58 Golden Hawk interior, they're all judgemental calls also. (In My opinion)

SN-60
01-26-2014, 12:02 AM
In general, I agree that the '57 GH will usually bring more money than a '58. But the handling of a '58 was definitely better because of several factors, especially the larger diameter front stabilizer bar along with its better mounting setup. The routing of the gas line was also better on the '58. It went under the pressure box and entered the box on the right side, going directly to the carb. The '57 GH gas line went to the left side of the box. Inside the box, there was a short gas line extension with fittings on both ends to get the gas to the right side of the carb. That made more points for possible leaks, two more fittings, and several additional bends/corners for the gas to go through on a '57.

George

Actually George, the routing of the fuel line on the '58 Golden Hawks is an excellent example of how Studebaker made changes to save money building these cars. Nicely routed through steel and brass fittings in '57, with the air box bottom itself drilled and tapped for the fuel to flow through. (as well as the distributor vacuum advance line at the rear of carb) On the 1958 Golden Hawks, and Packard Hawks also, Studebaker engineers took the easier, and cheaper, way out by simply routing the fuel and distributor vacuum lines into the air box via large holes drilled through the box with the pressurized air hopefully sealed by rubber grommets through which these lines passed. Grommets that eventually deteriorated and leaked. No George, the '57 Golden Hawk fuel delivery system was 'bulletproof', while the '58 system was dramatically inferior. (read that 'cheapened')
And while We are talking about it, I always wondered why Studebaker retained this inferior 'through the rubber grommet' fuel delivery system on the 1964 R3 air box setup? (Answer...MONEY!)

bezhawk
01-26-2014, 07:55 AM
If studebakers reason was to save money, then why go to the expense of changing the floor pan and rear seat riser. All of that took engineering and .....gasp .......money
The side grilles cost (get this) MONEY. Why chrome anything or offer two tones, or fins on the park lights? Don't those things cost money?
Your logic has no logic. Face it, there is nothing magical about 1957 that hasn't been put there by nostalgia and wishful thinking by mass marketing and the media. Forget the hype and look at the cars themselves and you will find the 58s are the better car.

SN-60
01-26-2014, 08:20 AM
If studebakers reason was to save money, then why go to the expense of changing the floor pan and rear seat riser. All of that took engineering and .....gasp .......money
The side grilles cost (get this) MONEY. Why chrome anything or offer two tones, or fins on the park lights? Don't those things cost money?
Your logic has no logic. Face it, there is nothing magical about 1957 that hasn't been put there by nostalgia and wishful thinking by mass marketing and the media. Forget the hype and look at the cars themselves and you will find the 58s are the better car.

BEZ... You're really equating Studebaker-Packard spending dollars changing a simple floor pan driveshaft tunnel stamping with: 'SAVING DOLLARS' adopting a single piece driveshaft instead of installing a two-piece? Not having to purchase and install a driveshaft center support bearing. Ability to eliminate the driveshaft center bearing support crossmember, it's rivets, and the labor to install that item onto the frame. Eliminating labor costs of assembling and installing a two-piece driveshaft. Savings on a much more simplistic transmission output shaft/ extension housing, by going with a simple slip-joint as opposed to the labor intensive two-piece flange setup that had to be assembled 'on line'. Factor in the cheaper interior, and hopefully You'll see that the '58 Golden IS NOT a better car than the '57 Golden.

R3 challenger
01-26-2014, 10:11 AM
The pressure box grommets on both my '58 GH and on the original R3 in the Plain Brown Wrapper are 50+ year old originals, and they don't leak. The engineers went to the trouble of fitting Golden Hawks with a larger 3/8" fuel line from the tank to the fuel pump (stock was 5/16") for better fuel flow, but on the '58 GH, there are fewer narrow fitting openings for the fuel to flow through, and there's only a gentle fuel line bend just before fuel enters the pressure box. From our experience working with stock lines & fittings at the Pure Stock Drags, fewer fittings and fewer sharp bends (unlike the '57 fuel line setup) is better for performance. I'll put up with changing a grommet every 50 years or so!

Additionally, the extra piece of fuel line going over the carb inside the '57 GH pressure box creates more turbulence...not the best for air flow.

George

SN-60
01-26-2014, 11:40 AM
The pressure box grommets on both my '58 GH and on the original R3 in the Plain Brown Wrapper are 50+ year old originals, and they don't leak. The engineers went to the trouble of fitting Golden Hawks with a larger 3/8" fuel line from the tank to the fuel pump (stock was 5/16") for better fuel flow, but on the '58 GH, there are fewer narrow fitting openings for the fuel to flow through, and there's only a gentle fuel line bend just before fuel enters the pressure box. From our experience working with stock lines & fittings at the Pure Stock Drags, fewer fittings and fewer sharp bends (unlike the '57 fuel line setup) is better for performance. I'll put up with changing a grommet every 50 years or so!

Additionally, the extra piece of fuel line going over the carb inside the '57 GH pressure box creates more turbulence...not the best for air flow.

George

Thank You for Your reply George, and I understand what You're saying, but do You REALLY believe Studebaker made that change to enhance the performance of the 1958 Golden Hawk? I think We both know they changed to cheap rubber grommets at the air box entry points in the interest of saving money wherever they could, considering the desperate financial situation they were in. And George, Your cars receive the best of care....but the air box grommets on the few unrestored '58 Goldens I have dealt with over the years CERTAINLY DID harden up and become brittle....as any piece of rubber would that is subject to considerable temperature extremes. Take care, Ed

bezhawk
01-26-2014, 12:23 PM
So your saying engineering new parts and making tools and dies is cheaper than using existing parts? I never said that the Golden hawks EVER had a rear sway bar you put those words on the page NOT me. I'm really sick of your statements that other people (and me) are WRONG for having an opinion that differs from yours. Get the hell over it.
From an engineering standpoint a single driveshaft is an IMPROVEMENT not cheapening the car. If you ever had drive line whip when getting on the throttle then you'd understand.
Please put further derogatory comments in a brown paper bag and mail it to: NOT INTERESTED c/o The rest of the world.

PS.....have a nice day

SN-60
01-26-2014, 03:09 PM
MOST people agree that the 1957 Studebaker Golden Hawk is more highly prized (and hence more valuable) than its 'next year' very comparable cousin. Time, and many sales, have proven this to be true. Also, Studebaker definitely 'cut back' on the Golden Hawk series in '58 to save money. The 'improvements' that have been mentioned by others were done 'across the board' from the most inexpensive Champion to the most expensive President model. I haven't yet mentioned that Studebaker also saved money by using the cheaper Bendix power steering system, as opposed to the superior but pricey Saginaw system used on the 1957 Golden Hawk. (except on 1958 Packard models)

PlainBrownR2
01-26-2014, 03:39 PM
I'm guessing that this reason also goes along with the Golden Hawks for using the airbox, but there's a really, really important reason why they did it with the R3's. The R2's had a sealed carburetor because of the Paxton, which worked great for that design, as it only put out 3-5 pounds. But, when they went to the higher output Paxton for the R3's, they had to go to a box. One of the reasons was that since the Paxton is a compressor, it's shoving air into the carburetor. Because of that, it's akin to blowing bubbles through a straw into your glass of water, but the liquid at the bottom of gasoline. If you have a sandwich gasket, bad accelerator pump seal, bad throttle seals, or you're using a vented R1 carburetor, since the supercharger is pressurizing the carburetor itself, it will start blowing fuel out all over top of the engine block. I dunno about anyone else, but that's grounds for a fire hazard! :eek:

When the R2 carburetors are sealed, they work great. But Studebaker didn't wanna have to reengineer the seals to stand up to the increased output of the higher output Paxton, so they dropped the whole carburetor in a sealed box. The higher pressure from the blower also meant higher problems for blowing fuel all over the place. In this fashion, the carburetor and the atmosphere around the carburetor are all equally pressurized, and the only thing you have to worry about is a couple of rubber grommets going into the box. Frankly, I like that design a whole lot better, since it solves the problem of having to pressurize the carburetor, reduces the "leaks" to a couple of grommets around the box, and there's no need to reinvent the wheel when they stepped up to a bigger supercharger! Call it cheap if you will, I call it removing a whole bunch of dangerous issues by using a simpler design! :D

Roscomacaw
01-26-2014, 09:05 PM
Craig writes: "Why didn't you take the drums back right there on the spot, and told him they weren't for sale? And if he wanted his money back, he could have followed you back home."

Craig, this guy was one huge, rough-lookin' dude. And I did not feature havin' a donnybrook there in the middle of a country road. Truth was, I was way more angry with my "friend" than the guy he'd brought. This friend was a bit "simple" if you know what I mean, and he had good intentions of selling some parts for me. It was just one of those incidents that we all have vex our lives now and then. I was more angry at the tresspassing than the parts taking. Suffice it to say, such an incident never happened again. I've treated my friend to a few six packs since that incident. Friends are more valuable than parts.

SN-60
01-28-2014, 04:16 PM
This is one of the few times that the lower production year (1958 Golden) is worth less than the MUCH higher production year (1957 Golden) I guess rarity doesn't always translate into dollars!;)

SN-60
01-29-2014, 04:28 PM
As nice looking as this Golden Hawk is....Studebaker's painting the roof to match the fin inserts on two-tone 1958 models, like this one, took away from the 'cleaner 1957 look. (in My opinion) Also, the owner of this Hawk has installed 15" wheels, (as the '57 model would have), as the 14" wheels that came standard on 1958 Golden Hawks really did nothing for the cars looks either.

studegary
01-30-2014, 12:20 PM
As nice looking as this Golden Hawk is....Studebaker's painting the roof to match the fin inserts on two-tone 1958 models, like this one, took away from the 'cleaner 1957 look. (in My opinion) Also, the owner of this Hawk has installed 15" wheels, (as the '57 model would have), as the 14" wheels that came standard on 1958 Golden Hawks really did nothing for the cars looks either.

I agree!
15 inch wheels were optional on 1958 Golden Hawks, but not on Packard Hawks, as per PD 8006 the '58 "Salesman's Data Book".

vmania
01-31-2014, 06:50 AM
Glad I've got a '57.....

wolfie
01-31-2014, 08:33 AM
Any follow up on the car from the original post? steve

WayneXG95
02-01-2014, 01:28 AM
I'm interested in the story, were's the guy that started this thread? :confused:

SN-60
02-01-2014, 08:31 AM
In 1958, 'HOT ROD MAGAZINE' did a thorough road test of the '58 Packard Hawk. The testers felt that the acceleration (0-60) was way off on this car (slow) as compared to other '58 models, and in comparison to what the 1957 Golden Hawk achieved in the previous year's road test. I've often wondered if there was something wrong with that particular Packard Hawk, or if they were all like that. (The Packard Hawk HRM tested did 0-60 in something like 9.5 seconds...the '57 Golden was in the 8 second range.....both automatic equipped, but I'm not sure about rear end ratios)