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doug
12-08-2013, 11:15 PM
I sent a watch to a vendor in Turning Wheels over a year ago. I feel like I am getting the run-around. It doesn't take this long does it?

Chris_Dresbach
12-08-2013, 11:25 PM
No, it takes about two weeks to repair a pocket watch. I collect South Bend watches and have one 21J Studebaker. There's a watch repairman here in town that I go through that does good work and typically costs between $50 and $100 depending on how messed up the watch is. Send me a PM if you want contact information.

hausdok
12-08-2013, 11:51 PM
Demand your watch back and then contact the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors (http://www.NAWCC.org) to find the name of someone who specializes in that type of watch who can fix it for you.

LStratton
12-09-2013, 01:36 AM
It depends on what grade South Bend you are having repaired. Parts will be extremely hard to find for some of the rare high grade watches and may take months or even years to find. On the common grades normal turn around is probably 2 - 4 weeks depending on work load. I know a couple of watchmakers who have a 6 - 8 month turn around. Good watch repair is getting harder to find, alot of butchers around.

studegary
12-09-2013, 12:48 PM
First try to resolve this with the vendor. If that doesn't work, contact the SDC Arbiter (contact info in TW) since the vendor advertises in Turning Wheels.

doug
12-10-2013, 04:16 PM
Thanks for the input. I felt it was an unreasonable amount of time and excuses but wanted to check before seeing if I'll recover my watch.

rknight89
12-10-2013, 07:15 PM
I have a 17j South Bend pocket watch that's been in use since 1907. I have taken it to my "little old man" local jeweler a couple times in the last 20 years and he has repaired it nicely. He replaced the main spring about 15-18 years ago and has made an adjustment once or twice. He has told me that the balance wheel could use a little work some day, but as long as it's working...leave it alone. When he replaced the main spring, he had it a couple days and when he made the adjustments, he had it a couple hours. He had to 'demagnetize' it once. Not sure what that means exactly, however, he did it while I was on my lunch break and didn't charge me for it. I don't wear it or use it daily so it doesn't get much wear and tear anymore. Seems to me, whoever is doing your repairs is either overloaded with work or something has gone wrong and is unable to fix what ails your watch. I work at the Post Office and the local jeweler is in nearly every day sending repaired items to his customers. I can give you his information if you'd like. I live in Illinois and I see you're in California. Not sure if you want to deal with a cross-country watch repair, but it's an option.

61LaRk4dr
12-11-2013, 03:02 PM
Several years back, my future wife bought me a 1927 Studebaker pocket watch which was in bad need of cleaning and repair. I recall it also needed a crystal since the original crystal was replaced with a plastic lens. Not knowing my options back then, I went to the local hometown jewelry store where the gentlemen to delivery of it for about two weeks. I picked up what seemed like an entirely different watch that has kept accurate time since. The point is, if you can find a local hometown jewelry store, it might save you headaches in the future....at least you know you can knock on/down their door if they end up not delivering.

Mike Van Veghten
12-11-2013, 03:44 PM
I have a good sized Studebaker/South Bend watch collection also...thanks e-Bay...!

This is what I use every day. I don't like things flopping around on my wrist.. Anyway, seems that they need work every year to year and a half on a "good" rebuild... I understand this is pretty normal for mechanical pocket watches carried on a daily basis.

I've used both of the vendors from the T.W. adds with varied success. Though neither kept any watch more than a coupla weeks at a time. It just seems to varie greatly on how well the "rebuild" actually turns out..! I had one 21 jewel that lasted almost two years of daily usage, and another last for 6 months..!
The one in my pocket currently is a cheaper, model 209 (9 jewels) and it's been running well for about a year now. I guess I should knock on wood or something as I'm running out of "running" watches...!

Time to find a good "old fashioned" watch maker/repairer myself.

Mike

Dick Clemens
12-11-2013, 03:51 PM
Does anyone have info on GeorgeReienour in TN. Please let me know how he's doing.

studedick from the lower Ozarks

LeoH
12-11-2013, 04:35 PM
I'm a little surprised at the dearth of recommendations for Studebaker watch repair folks, especially given the several on here who have had a Stude watch and had it repaired.
Even in previous threads for watch repair, I'm not recollecting more than one or maybe two names of folks someone was willing to speak about publicly.

Chris_Dresbach
12-11-2013, 10:57 PM
I have a good sized Studebaker/South Bend watch collection also...thanks e-Bay...!

This is what I use every day. I don't like things flopping around on my wrist.. Anyway, seems that they need work every year to year and a half on a "good" rebuild... I understand this is pretty normal for mechanical pocket watches carried on a daily basis.

I've used both of the vendors from the T.W. adds with varied success. Though neither kept any watch more than a coupla weeks at a time. It just seems to varie greatly on how well the "rebuild" actually turns out..! I had one 21 jewel that lasted almost two years of daily usage, and another last for 6 months..!
The one in my pocket currently is a cheaper, model 209 (9 jewels) and it's been running well for about a year now. I guess I should knock on wood or something as I'm running out of "running" watches...!

Time to find a good "old fashioned" watch maker/repairer myself.

Mike

I guess you and I are sort of in the same boat. Pocket watches are addictive. Once you get one, you have to have another, and another, and another, and before you know it you have a collection. It's kind of like collecting cars but much cheaper and watches take up less space, yet at the same time are high end pieces of engineering art that are antiques. My dad started it by buying South Bend watches on ebay, and then I started. I bought my first South Bend locally from a coin shop that I've done business with for years. I wanted that particular South Bend just because I thought it looked cool and the price was fair, but it was by dumb luck that I later figured out that I got a fairly rare watch. It's just a typical 411 but has a SB Panama case and an original glow in the dark dial. I had it fixed up and it's probably my best, and favorite watch. So then I go another 411 because it came with an original South Bend Watch dealer display, but this time it was a Chesterfield dial, so I had it repaired too. And then a friend of mine found a random 411 Chesterfield and sold it to me for what he had in it, which was next to nothing. Then I fell into dumb luck again and got an 18S 333 on Ebay for next to nothing, and at that time I bought it just because. As it turned out, a 333 is a rare watch. At some point I wanted to get a Studebaker, so I got a 1927 16S, 21J. It runs, and is one of my better watches. After assembling a small fleet of South Bend watches, I read up on a little history. The Studebaker family bought out the Columbus watch Co. of Ohio to start the South Bend Watch Co. So I figured I had to have one, so I got an 1888 Columbus 18S, and then another of the same year but a swing out case! I had one Columbus restored, the other might or might not get done, I haven't decided yet. And I also accumulated South Bend Watch memorabilia since I started collecting. As I said, I have an original dealer display box, and a shipping tin, a "The Studebaker" railroad watch fob, and a promotional pin.
I don't wear my watches every day though. Working at SI all day and then training on the Fire Dept, I don't want one to get smashed in my pocket. So what I typically do is wear a different one every Sunday.