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View Full Version : Fun with EBAY!...Who knew?



jclary
07-22-2013, 08:59 PM
I have run across many odd Ebay listings and we've all had our fun with some of them. I'll just post the link and...well...what do you think...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1949-Studebaker-Funeral-Flower-Car-1950s-Custom-Lead-Sled-Ratrod-Hotrod-RARE-/171079292736?pt=US_Cars_Trucks&hash=item27d51ed740

Bob Andrews
07-22-2013, 09:09 PM
It would be awesome to own something so rare.

I know this to be true because the seller said so.

mmagic
07-22-2013, 11:28 PM
With Studebaker's reputation of any mod to make a sale, a factory mod like this could be plausible. Perhaps the penchant to modify Studes that we see today should not be surprising if the factory itself had a habit of doing it!

JimC
07-22-2013, 11:44 PM
Possible? Sure. That said, it looks a little sloppy to be a factory job. I bet if someone could get the serial number from him, the archive experts would know in minutes what this really started out as.

Da Tinman
07-23-2013, 12:25 AM
I don't care what the story is, that thing needs to be in my driveway! I would fix that problem under the hood with something a bit more correct of course.

Chris_Dresbach
07-23-2013, 12:43 AM
From the looks of it I would almost guess that it started out as a business coupe, but I can't quite tell if the roof is the right leingth. Sure is odd looking. I've heard some pretty "out there" stories about factory custom cars in the past, and I'll agree that the finish work is a little rough for this car to be a factory special order car. Coming from a guy that actually owns a real factory altered car, I will be the first to say that the lead workers and welders at Studebaker in the Engineering dept. did a good job of hiding cut marks. I can tell where my car was sectioned, but I also know what I'm looking for; otherwise the body work is "flowing" and seamless. It would be interesting to see the build sheet for this car, but until then I'm going to guess that it was probably somebody's attempt at creating an El Camino out of a Studebaker. But if it was restored and built right, it could be made into something really cool and unique. The story of its origin is just a little too far fetched.

sals54
07-23-2013, 12:43 AM
Hey Tinman, I dig what you mean. I thought the car was pretty slick. Though it needs some refining, the essence of the car is pretty Kool. Tidy up the way the rear window panel blends with the bed and it would be just about there.
Mechanically, even a 305 in front of the 700 would be a great addition. The 6s can be fun, but for regular cruising a V8 is still the way to go in my book.

JimC
07-23-2013, 01:01 AM
Kart Hauler 2, perhaps? :)

Da Tinman
07-23-2013, 01:04 AM
I have a running Studey 259 w/at sitting in my back room and a 63 Lark parts car with 289/OD either would love to drop in to this thing.

Rear window looks off and there's a sharp crease right behind the door where it transitions to the glass. Wiring harness looks like its been cobbled up from the pics of the dash.

Double wall bed that looks pretty well done, I requested pics of the tailgate area.

Hoping someone in my line of finance has a sense of humor!

Da Tinman
07-23-2013, 01:11 AM
BTW for those of you that haven't been around the older funeral cars they could be pretty rough from the coachworks. I looked at a 69 Caddy flower car a few years back and it was a bondo bucket and I passed on it thinking it had been cabbaged up during a resto only to find out that was probably how it was done when new.

clonelark
07-23-2013, 02:25 AM
Looked at it the other day, (on E-bay, not in person), I thought what a cool pick-up could be made from that car. There is no picture of the tailgate. Looks like it was made from a Commander Business Coupe, A pretty rare car in itself. Only 1 1951 commander business coupe was made, wonder how many 1949 Commander Business Coupes were made?

rockne10
07-23-2013, 04:02 AM
I imagine the dearly departed really grooved out to that shaved hood and out of this world wheel discs.

8E45E
07-23-2013, 06:09 AM
From the looks of it I would almost guess that it started out as a business coupe, but I can't quite tell if the roof is the right leingth. Sure is odd looking. I've heard some pretty "out there" stories about factory custom cars in the past, and I'll agree that the finish work is a little rough for this car to be a factory special order car. Coming from a guy that actually owns a real factory altered car, I will be the first to say that the lead workers and welders at Studebaker in the Engineering dept. did a good job of hiding cut marks. I can tell where my car was sectioned, but I also know what I'm looking for; otherwise the body work is "flowing" and seamless. It would be interesting to see the build sheet for this car, but until then I'm going to guess that it was probably somebody's attempt at creating an El Camino out of a Studebaker. But if it was restored and built right, it could be made into something really cool and unique. The story of its origin is just a little too far fetched.

I'd love to see the build sheet to confirm it if was a 'factory' conversion. And if it was, I wouldn't be at all surprised if it was farmed out to Edwards Iron Works, given how busy the factory was with regular production in those early postwar years.

Craig

jclary
07-23-2013, 06:34 AM
Build sheet aside...this is a fun story. Some of you other mountain dwelling Studebaker owners need to pay this fellow a visit and invite him into the SDC. If he can also play a banjo...so much the better. Heck...with stories like this, he would fit right in here on the forum!:):!::)

DEEPNHOCK
07-23-2013, 07:01 AM
Except for the (later) typical junkyard engine and wiring swap..
This looks like a neat professional car (limo/funeral/flower car, etc)...

The bed modifications look professionally done.
I doubt the Studebaker factory did the modifications, as they would have added some kind of stamping ribs to reinforce the floor.
But an aftermarket coach builder would have used flat sheets of steel....

26067

This could be a unique Stude to drive around in...
Add some air shocks... Put some lawn chairs in back...
Parade time!:rolleyes:
Jeffhttp://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/images/icons/icon6.png

mmagic
07-23-2013, 07:15 AM
Personally, I'd never heard of a flower car and couldn't imagine why you'd carry flowers in an open vehicle to get blown around. But the always correct Wikipedia shows such an animal on a brand X Chassis. It explains their use both to carry flowers and caskets in snob funerals....

So based on the average casket being 84" the question is would a standard Business Coupe chassis be long enough to accommodation an average casket? By measuring side shots of Stude Business Coupes and truing estimates by the known 112" wheel base, I concluded perhaps if every inch behind the seat was used for the casket tray. The pictures of this e-bay special show that in fact the bed appears to reach under the back window to the back of the seat. As this cut away would require more body work than a simple stop at the back window if converted by an amateur hacker, my conclusion would be that the story is quite possibly true. What puzzles me is what somber funeral director would need a radio in a flower car to listen to the ball game while in a funeral procession!

If it were restored to original state I'd be proud if you carried my ashes in this Stude ( or my Speedster ).

26068

DEEPNHOCK
07-23-2013, 07:34 AM
Big difference between a hearse and a flower car.
Several coach builders made hearses out of Stude sedans in the 20's and 30's (1937 comes to mind)

http://tinyurl.com/Studebaker-hearse-pictures

And there were some 'different' flower cars out there....

http://images.hemmings.com/wp-content/uploads//2013/02/Professional-car-4-194X-700x704.jpg

http://images.hemmings.com/wp-content/uploads//2010/11/Argentinefuneralcar_04_1000-700x394.jpg

http://imageocd.com/images/cars1/packard-flower-car-pictures-and-wallpapers/packard-flower-car.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3388/3327156384_05be0c8f93.jpg






Personally, I'd never heard of a flower car and couldn't imagine why you'd carry flowers in an open vehicle to get blown around. But the always correct Wikipedia shows such an animal on a brand X Chassis. It explains their use both to carry flowers and caskets in snob funerals....

So based on the average casket being 84" the question is would a standard Business Coupe chassis be long enough to accommodation an average casket? By measuring side shots of Stude Business Coupes and truing estimates by the known 112" wheel base, I concluded perhaps if every inch behind the seat was used for the casket tray. The pictures of this e-bay special show that in fact the bed appears to reach under the back window to the back of the seat. As this cut away would require more body work than a simple stop at the back window if converted by an amateur hacker, my conclusion would be that the story is quite possibly true. What puzzles me is what somber funeral director would need a radio in a flower car to listen to the ball game while in a funeral procession!

If it were restored to original state I'd be proud if you carried my ashes in this Stude ( or my Speedster ).

jclary
07-23-2013, 07:57 AM
Believe it or not...I once owned a former "flower car." (Now who's tell'n tales?):rolleyes: Not long after I bought my first Studebaker (the 55 truck in my sig pic), and discovered there was such a thing as the SDC, I realized that my truck had more value than a mere "old" truck. When I suggested to my wife that I needed to preserve the truck and get another...she put her foot down and said, "I'll be darned if I'm gonna only be living in a mobile home and have two trucks cluttering the yard!":mad:Meaning...get your priorities in order!:mad:

At that time, I wasn't long out of college, had a new baby, and a lowly entry level state government job.:( My wife had an uncle who was a used car wholesaler. He had a network of new car dealers where he would pick up, detail and re-sell "trade-in" cars to local used car dealers in our local area. I had mentioned to him that I would like to have another truck and if he found a "good deal" on one to give me a call. Not long after that, he called and told me that one of his supplier dealers in North Carolina had a brother who owned a funeral home. They had a low mileage '72 El Camino with matching topper that had been used at the funeral home to carry flowers to the grave. It was a 350 V8, well equipped (complete with air shocks) silver painted three year old car with less than 12,000 miles. The funeral home wanted to replace it because they upgraded their fleet every three years. Although I had just changed jobs, and built a new house, I somehow managed to buy that car/truck and keep the Studebaker. When I brought that car/truck home, I explained to my wife that it was a compromise...half car, half truck!:rolleyes::!:

That is one of the few vehicles in my past that I wish I had not gotten rid of. My wife came to love the truck and, after I was supplied with a "company" car...the El Camino became her daily driver. As far as the subject car of this thread, no one need to be concerned about whether or not the bed could have held a casket. Flower cars were just that...Flower Cars...only used to transport the large flower arrangements typical for the intended occasion.

mmagic
07-23-2013, 08:09 AM
Now this is a real Studebaker Hearse? Flower Car?... 1929

http://www.hearse.com/pages_to_file_1/10236.html

26069

8E45E
07-23-2013, 08:22 AM
Packard used Henney Body for their hearse, flower car, and limousine conversions. http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?56771-What-!-Another-1941-Packard-PIc-(-oldie-)&highlight=henney

I think Superior did some of the Studebaker hearse conversions.

Craig

DEEPNHOCK
07-23-2013, 08:37 AM
That is a children's hearse.
There are a few threads about it around here somewhere.... It was for sale a while back.



Now this is a real Studebaker Hearse? Flower Car?... 1929

http://www.hearse.com/pages_to_file_1/10236.html

26069

tbirdtbird
07-23-2013, 11:15 PM
Henney Coach would build a custom body (typically a hearse, limo, flower car, etc) from whatever base car the customer desired....caddy, buick, packard, anything. They may have been involved in this.
I have a '54 Packard ambulance they built from a Packard Clipper. They are long defunct.

Roscomacaw
07-24-2013, 12:52 PM
It needs a rumble seat or two back there!