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BobWaitz
04-04-2013, 03:30 PM
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/04/04/176261560/roger-ebert-legendary-film-critic-dies

Roger Ebert, the legendary film critic, died today, his long-time employer, The Chicago Sun-Times is reporting.

Ebert had been wrestling with cancer for years. Over his life, he was treated for salivary gland cancer, thyroid cancer and cancer of the jawbone. In 2006, Ebert lost his jaw and with it, his ability to talk, but he still kept up an unrelenting pace, reviewing more than 200 movies a year for the paper and keeping up an admired digital presence. On his blog and on twitter, he chronicled his struggle with cancer and just two days ago,

Ebert was 70.

"At this point in my life, in addition to writing about movies, I may write about what it's like to cope with health challenges and the limitations they can force upon you," he wrote. "It really stinks that the cancer has returned and that I have spent too many days in the hospital. So on bad days I may write about the vulnerability that accompanies illness. On good days, I may wax ecstatic about a movie so good it transports me beyond illness."

Back in 2011, . He had just written a memoir titled Life Itself. Ebert spoke through a digitize voice on his computer.

Melissa asked him about what most people will remember him by: His television show with Gene Siskel, in which the two of them would give films thumbs up and thumbs down.

"We were often angry with one another," he told Melissa. "At other times we were very warm. I think we shared a strong sense of morality about films that offended us, either by their content or their general stupidity."

Perhaps Ebert's greatest accomplishment was his 1975 Pulitzer Prize. He was the first film critic to win one.

He reviewed films for the Sun-Times for 46 years and on TV for 31. says Ebert was not only "widely popular" but "professionally respected."

They point out that the critic gig came out of nowhere. He was offered the job at the Sun-Times when "the previous critic, Eleanor Keen, retired."

"I didn't know the job was open until the day I was given it," the paper quotes Ebert as saying. "I had no idea. Bob Zonka, the features editor, called me into the conference room and said, 'We're gonna make you the movie critic.' It fell out of the sky."

Bob Bryant
04-04-2013, 03:36 PM
This article regarding Roger Ebert was posted a couple of years ago. Maybe new to some folks. Very interesting!

http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2008/12/ive_got_the_sweetest_set_of_wh.html

57pack
04-04-2013, 04:26 PM
Goodbye and goodnight Robert. Thank you for all you did, and thank you for that great Studebaker/ Packard story.
As a aside, Lincoln took his last ride in a Studebaker. I have always heard that Henry Ford took his last ride in a Packard, it was a hearse and he was on his one way ride to the cemetery. Don't know if that is really true, does anyone know for sure?
Thank you
Bill

Bill Pressler
04-04-2013, 04:39 PM
Goodbye and goodnight Robert. Thank you for all you did, and thank you for that great Studebaker/ Packard story.
As a aside, Lincoln took his last ride in a Studebaker. I have always heard that Henry Ford took his last ride in a Packard, it was a hearse and he was on his one way ride to the cemetery. Don't know if that is really true, does anyone know for sure?
Thank you
Bill

I have heard, also, that Henry Ford was transported in a Packard hearse as there was no such thing as a Ford hearse at the time.

I was three feet away from Roger Ebert at the old Studebaker National Museum in South Bend of all places. I'd say this was around 1990 or so. It was the May swap meet weekend. I was with my baritone-voiced Packard buddy at the time and he said loudly, "There's Roger Ebert", when we were quite near him. I think my buddy thought Roger was going to start talking to us. He didn't. He walked in the other direction! I can't really blame him.

Maybe three (?) years ago, I saw he was writing a blog. I asked him "Baby Jane or Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte?" (two similar films by the same producer and starring Bette Davis), but he didn't answer....I think meaning he probably didn't like either! LOL I did ask him about his enjoyment of Studebakers and his owning a Hawk and he did reply on the blog about always wanting a '57 Golden Hawk since new and that his father always told him he wouldn't be able to get parts for a Studebaker, after they had shut down and how wrong his Dad was on that. I can't recall that I asked him if he still owned it or not.

A sad day, I think. Can anyone think of two movie critics more entertaining than Siskel and Ebert? I sure can't.

Studebaker Wheel
04-04-2013, 05:26 PM
I met Roger at a Steak 'n Shake in Michigan City, Indiana in c2006. He was traveling alone on his way to a summer home in Michigan. We chatted briefly as I had written about his ownership of the '57 Hawk in my Almanac column in TW and he remembered that. He indicated that he had sold the car to Dan Jedlicka who was automotive editor of the Sun Times.

rockne10
04-04-2013, 08:49 PM
http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g233/rockne10/rogerebert-1_zpse9027dd6.jpg

BobPalma
04-05-2013, 12:04 PM
Here is the item about Roger Ebert that appeared within Dick Quinn's Studebaker Almanac section of the December 1991 Turning Wheels:

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/ebert57GH_zpsf92d350a.jpg

:) BP

Bob Bryant
01-04-2015, 06:21 PM
Tonight at 9:00PM EST CNN is supposed to run a documentary on Roger Ebert. I think it has been shown before. Here is a link to Roger's comments about his Golden Hawk. I am sure it has been posted in the past.

http://www.rogerebert.com/rogers-journal/ive-got-the-sweetest-set-of-wheels-in-town