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View Full Version : Adding an electric fuel pump - looking for ideas



JimC
07-17-2012, 09:44 AM
I've decided that I'm going to put an electric fuel pump on the '63 to help with starts after sitting, vapor lock, etc. I think I fully understand the electrical wiring aspect of it, but I'm curious as to where people typically insert the break in the fuel line to add/mount the pump. Also, how should it be plumbed? Can I use lengths of rubber fuel hose and clamps to conect the pump, or should there be hard line going into and out of the pump? Insight (and pictures of your install) are greatly appreciated!

(Also, I didn't know if this would technically fall under general conversation or tech talk since it's not exactly a stock repair. Clark, feel free to move it if I'm slopping up your tidy forums! :D)

sasquatch
07-17-2012, 12:05 PM
This is my 2R15 installation. The metal line on the left connects to the fuel tank. The pump is bolted to the frame using the clamp that came with the pump. The main thing you want to do is keep the pump as close to the tank as possible and use a filter between the tank and the pump. I've got just enough hose there to be able to replace the filter. You can use a tubing cutter to remove a section of fuel line for installing the pump, etc. The pump only puts out a maximum of 8 PSI and I have had zero leaks with this installation.
16374

JimC
07-17-2012, 01:43 PM
Isnt 8 psi a lot for a Stude engine? I was under the impression that 4 or 5 psi would be sufficient, or is that only the case for the cars (as opposed to the trucks)?

2R5
07-17-2012, 01:49 PM
I have an inline fuel pump on my Champ truck that is only turned on after the truck has been sitting for a length of time. I have it directly hooked up to a spring loaded toggle switch which is under my dash. All other times the mechanical pump does its job...this has been on there for almost 10 years now and it works just fine.

Mike Van Veghten
07-17-2012, 01:54 PM
Been covered a BUNCH of times. The "Search" function is your friend.

And yes, 8psi is a bit high for a daily driver. Has nothing to do with the "brand" of car..
As for the pressure, 5-1/2 to 6 psi is more than enough for a carbureted, daily driver. If you are racing...that's a different story.
Most carb's. in good shape will hold back 8 psi, but it's not needed to be that high. Makes the needle and seat work harder thAn required.

Plus....higher than required pressure will actually richen the carb's "jetting"...so to speak. That is...since the needle ans seat have to work harder to hold back the pressure, the float level in the chamber will rise somewhat because of the float needing to push harder on the needle.
Now, with the float level higher than needed, the fuel is closer to the spill point of going into the booster ventury, takes less energy to push the fuel into the booster.

All that is to say...despite 8 or even 9 psi..."working", don't over work and mess with the carburetors calibration....5-1/2 to 6psi is plenty.

Mike

JimC
07-17-2012, 02:39 PM
Thanks Mike.

I guess I just wasn't sure if the motor in the truck would have a different carb setup that would need a higher psi, which was the reason for asking. What you said fits with my plan. I found an inexpensive pump that tops out at 6psi. I don't know whether I want to run off electric full time, or if I just want it for the boost at startups and to prevent vapor lock. If my pump's max psi is 6, then I assume that I wouldn't need a regulator. Any objections to that thinking?

As far as posting a much-discussed thread, I recognize that and sincerely and humbly apologize for angering the forum deities with my unacceptable sin. I actually did search first, and found a lot of semi-recent posts that didn't directly answer my questions or provide the photos I was hoping to see. I eventually found a few posts that were more relevant to what I was doing and had decent info, but they were from years ago. I'm the sort of guy that enjoys the "interactive" nature of the Internet, and if I have a challenge I want to be able to ask for help. So my options were either revive a long forgotten thread with several posts from members that aren't here anymore to answer my questions, or start a new thread on a much rehashed topic. I figured I was going to catch some cantankerousness either way, so I went with the option that I felt was the most benefit to me. If it's that horrible of a thing, then let me know when the firing squad is arriving so I can be ready :D

sasquatch
07-17-2012, 02:49 PM
Guess everybody missed the word "maximum" in my post. I would suspect the "normal" operating PSI to be less than that. My truck runs just fine using only the electric pump. No more vapor locking/boiling fuel, stalling in traffic, etc. I'm happy with that. Your results may vary.

53k
07-17-2012, 03:50 PM
...As far as posting a much-discussed thread, I recognize that and sincerely and humbly apologize for angering the forum deities with my unacceptable sin. I actually did search first, and found a lot of semi-recent posts that didn't directly answer my questions or provide the photos I was hoping to see. I eventually found a few posts that were more relevant to what I was doing and had decent info, but they were from years ago. I'm the sort of guy that enjoys the "interactive" nature of the Internet, and if I have a challenge I want to be able to ask for help. So my options were either revive a long forgotten thread with several posts from members that aren't here anymore to answer my questions, or start a new thread on a much rehashed topic. I figured I was going to catch some cantankerousness either way, so I went with the option that I felt was the most benefit to me. If it's that horrible of a thing, then let me know when the firing squad is arriving so I can be ready :D
I'm probably especially dumb re using the search function, but I almost never come up with previous information that is helpful so you certainly don't offend me "rehashing" (for what that's worth).

JimC
07-17-2012, 04:39 PM
Guess everybody missed the word "maximum" in my post. I would suspect the "normal" operating PSI to be less than that. My truck runs just fine using only the electric pump. No more vapor locking/boiling fuel, stalling in traffic, etc. I'm happy with that. Your results may vary.
Do you have a pressure regulator on there at all, or is it just coming at whatever psi the pump is operating at?

And a general question: I found another pump that advertises 4.5 psi, and is a little more affordable. again, I don't plan on relying solely on this pump while driving, but would it still be of use, or is 4.5 psi too low?

52-fan
07-17-2012, 04:45 PM
I read an article somewhere recently (Hot Rod Magazine?) where they discussed the fact that often the pump will not deiliver its max rated flow to the carb because of voltage drop and the like. The only way to know for sure is to take a reading at the carb.

sasquatch
07-17-2012, 04:48 PM
No regulator-just what the pump puts out. I would think 4.5 PSI would be OK as that should be close to what the mechanical pump operated at. I got my 6V Airtex electric pump for about $50 which I thought was affordable.

52hawk
07-17-2012, 05:22 PM
4.5 lbs will be fine,and your carb will thank you for not giving it more. 5-6 lbs. would be the UPPER pressure limit.