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cultural infidel
04-24-2012, 11:22 PM
IS anyone running the purple stuff in their Stude? I have heard good things on 4x4 sites. Wondering if anyone in Stude-land has run it and their opinion on it.

Bud
04-25-2012, 07:33 AM
I don't think that using a 5W-30 oil in a Studebaker engine is a good idea as the internal clearances on the older engines are larger than the modern engines. I use 5W-30 in my new Chevy engines because that is what is recommended. I use 15W-40 in my Studebaker engines as it holds good oil pressure and I have lower oil consumption. I checked with both the Shell and Chevron tech guys recently about using the lighter synthetic oils in the older engines and they both recommended not doing it for the reasons stated earlier. Take a look at bobistheoilguy.com for great information regarding lubricants. That being said, if you decide to go with the RP 5W-30, let us know how it works out. Bud

BobPalma
04-25-2012, 07:55 AM
'Just getting ready to post what Bud said, so ditto his remarks. BP

Dan White
04-25-2012, 07:59 AM
I agree with Bub, 5W-30 oils are designed for modern engines and a synthetic 5W is way too light to use older engines that were designed for 10W min. Not only that, most Studes either leak or use a bit of oil. Royal Purple is pretty darn expensive to be leaving on the ground or blowing out the tail pipe. I use one of the 15W-40 Diesel Oils (Chevron Delo, or Shell Rotella T) in my Studes and also my Hudson and they work really well. Not worth the expense and possible increased engine wear.

cultural infidel
04-25-2012, 08:09 AM
Thank you for the info fellas. I guess that I should have left it at just Royal Purple in general. not specifically the 5w-30. I know that they offer 10w and 15w as well. I had found RP online for $5-6qt which isnt horrible.

That being said, there are a lot of higher mileage oils out there, any worth a damn?

Never heard of Rotella T. One of my buddies has used Amsoil religiously over the years. So he is pushing that.

The engine in the 65 is supposedly the original and has quite a few miles on it. Trying to make it last as long as possible.

63larkr1
04-25-2012, 08:41 AM
I have used RP 5w20 with no additives for years in my R1 Lark that we race pure stock. I never needed to add oil and absolutely no smoke. This engine has hundreds of runs down the 1/4 mile with this oil. I don't make any recommendations on oil. To many variables only you know. My R1 is ready for a freshening with all the wot runs, and the internal bearings and other parts have been subject to extremes for more than 12 years. Itís over due.
Again, I don't make any recommendations, just answering your question. I donít discount anything other say on this subject.
Richard

PackardV8
04-25-2012, 09:54 AM
Yes, Royal Purple is a good oil.

No, I've never found any brand name oil which which in the correct weight wouldn't safely and satisfactorily lubricate and protect a stock Studebaker engine. By any standards our engines are pretty agricultural. In normal driving, they don't put heavy loads on bearings or lifters.

Maybe, since all major brand oils pass the same certification standards, just buy whatever is on sale at the local FLAPS.

jack vines

stevo5671
04-25-2012, 02:54 PM
I use regular 10W 40 in the power hawk, synthetic blend 5w 40 in my 04 Pacifica, and full synthetic 5w 30 in my 07 Audi. I have heard that running synthetic in cars that have not previously used synthetic can cause/worsen oil leaks. The oil doesn't actually cause leaks, but the extra detergents can free up "crud" that might be slowing down previous leaks making them seem worse. However, we all know that Studebakers hardly ever leak oil ;)

cultural infidel
04-25-2012, 03:06 PM
so the safest bet in the 65 would probably be a 10w30 or 15w40?

Warren Webb
04-25-2012, 03:09 PM
I've been running Royal Purple in my R-2 Hawk now for about 8 years. Seems to be fine for me-no oil consumption & performance has stayed steady. When I had to replace the axle in my 93 Ranger I used their gear oil then too. I prefer to buy mine at the local speed shop over Autozone due to wanting them to stay around for the times I need those "special" things.

62champ
04-25-2012, 04:47 PM
Since switching to Royal Purple in my brand Xs three years ago - I am a believer. Had lifter clatter on start up when temps got below 20. At the time I was running Mobil 1. One morning when it was about 5 it sounded like there was tin can band under the hood. Next oil change was a week away and decided to bite the bullet and spend the $5 per quart (in 2009) and get the RP. Even when it was -3 last winter I did not hear a peep out of the valve train.

They offer everything from 0W20 to 20W50. They even have straight weights in 30, 40, and 50. Shop around - even with shipping it is cheaper on-line sometimes. My local FLAPS/speed shop that has been around forever always has it in stock and it goes for less than $6.50 a quart.

Good luck.

kamzack
04-25-2012, 11:58 PM
Check Lubrication Engineers Web site. They make a 15W40 with a high zinc content, very compatible with flat tappet engines. Also petroleum base, non syn/oil good for high mileage or new and a long drain oil. Phone # 800-537-7683
Kim

cultural infidel
05-04-2012, 11:35 AM
The RP in store was $15qrt... I had found it online for $6qrt. I should have ordered it online. Will be doing so for next time though. I ended up getting Pennzoil High Mileage and a Wix filter. Slowing making some progress. The oil was definitely due for a change. Have no clue when the last one was done... I have a feeling that it was quite some time ago. The PO showed me the dipstick and it was black and said, "not too bad for an old car." errrr what?! lol i did use a zinc additive when I changed the oil.

Dan White
05-04-2012, 08:01 PM
I know when I started in this hobby that I planned to use the best of the best for my cars. However over the years it became apparent the I was “gilding the lilly” as they say. It is your money and your car and of course you do what you want, but for what you have you would be best off as Kim suggests using a good quality 15W40 with sufficient zinc for a flat tappet cammed engine. That is what I do now for my Studes and my Hudson. Using a modern synthetic with low zinc content wll work, but it will not protect your cam surfaces unless you add a zinc additive and then you costs goes even higher. Our studes were designed to have an oil change every 2.5 - 3K or less (at least once a year if you are not driving it over 3K miles per year), today’s engines are designed for longer intervals due to less leakage of fuel and impurities into the oiling system due to fuel injection, not to mention tighter tolerances. Just my 2Ę worth.

SilverHawkDan
05-04-2012, 11:51 PM
We used the RP gear oil in the trans and differential in the Avanti for the last two years. It made shifting easier and the trans and diff turned over easier after the change to RP. I know that Dave Bloomberg used Amsoil at Bonneville as I got him the deal on it from a fellow hot rodder. In the engine we used Delo 400 diesel grade 15w40 oil. I also use it in the camper 289 that I tow the Avanti with. I noticed that I didn't have any oil wear issues in the Bonneville engines. I have friends who use RP in their race engines and street cars and swear by it. Same with Amsoil. SO there you have my 2 cents.
Dan

Dan White
05-05-2012, 10:36 AM
Using premium and/or synthetic oil in the rear is probably a good idea since it is rarely changed. On the other hand the oil in my ’50 Hudson rear and 3 speed trannie is the original from the factory! I use Amsoil in my ’08 Subaru STI as it is a high performance turbo charged engine and runs at high RPMs. I use Delo 15W40 in my Studes and Hudson engines as they are changed more often and do not have the requirements of my Subaru and also has a bit more zinc for the cam. If you are racing or have severe duty where you need the performance then Amsoil or RP is what you should use, but for an occasional driver it is way overkill and again it does nothing to protect your flat tappet cam. I am not saying there is anything wrong with RP, Amsoil, or any other high performance synthetic petroleum products, however it is a good idea to use the right product for the right application and in this case using RP in a Stude or old engine is probably not the best application. Again your money your car.

sweetolbob
05-05-2012, 10:58 AM
A lot of good discussion both here, now, previously and all over the internet.

My feeling in a nutshell. I don't know at what spring pressures, cam lift or other variables that ZDDP is necessary or if it is at all, But I'll tell you that in my flat tappet engines there will be the current oils that I can buy at my FLAPS on sale w/filter and a $10 bottle of ZDDP concentrate.

With the oil change frequency that most of us have the $10 cost to not provide a data point on camshaft failure is money well spent in my book.

Bob

JoeHall
05-06-2012, 07:05 AM
Yes, Royal Purple is a good oil.

No, I've never found any brand name oil which which in the correct weight wouldn't safely and satisfactorily lubricate and protect a stock Studebaker engine. By any standards our engines are pretty agricultural. In normal driving, they don't put heavy loads on bearings or lifters. Maybe, since all major brand oils pass the same certification standards, just buy whatever is on sale at the local FLAPS.jack vines

"Agricultural" seem like the best descript I have heard in awhile. If we treat them as such, don't overly complicate care & maintenance, and don't expect too much from them, they will run dependably forever.

Gunslinger
05-06-2012, 08:57 AM
Yes, Royal Purple is a good oil.

No, I've never found any brand name oil which which in the correct weight wouldn't safely and satisfactorily lubricate and protect a stock Studebaker engine. By any standards our engines are pretty agricultural. In normal driving, they don't put heavy loads on bearings or lifters.

Maybe, since all major brand oils pass the same certification standards, just buy whatever is on sale at the local FLAPS.

jack vines


Absolutely. There's so much misinformation on the net about motor oils and flat tappet engines. From what I've been able to determine from all the information...both good and bad...is that engines such as Studebaker designs are at no real risk. If any Stude engines are it would be the R- engines due to higher valve spring pressures.

The entire controversy stems from unrelated but concurrent events...the EPA mandating lower ZDDP content in motor oils and substandard camshafts and lifters coming in from offshore. Many cams wiped and engine builders blamed it on the oil. Even then, the problem was pretty much confined to high performance engines with high valve spring pressures. For the most part it occurred more than not during break-in. Once the real problem was recognized and corrected it's really a non-issue but the myths and controversy lives on.

There's no such thing as a mom and pop oil refinery...the motor oils today are far better than what was available when Studebaker was building cars. If today's motor oils are that bad for older engines, why aren't there old cars constantly blowing their engines? How many that do blow their engines doing it from poor maintenance or are simply worn out and being blamed on today's oils? I remember all the predictions of mass engine failures when unleaded gasoline was phased in...it didn't happen. Those that did were likely from poor maintenance or being worn out anyway.

If one has a performance engine with high valve spring pressures and can't find motor oil with the necessary ZDDP, a container of STP or similar is all that's required. If you can find motor oils with the ZDDP, then no further additives are necessary.