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View Full Version : This does concern me..........we could use some "new blood"



1962larksedan
01-23-2012, 09:06 PM
Long story short: my fiance and I went to the Studebaker meet at the auto museum this past Saturday and what struck me was the avg. age of most of the participants. I was one of the relative "babies" and I'll be 55 this year. The people there were def young at heart admittedly. :)

BobPalma
01-23-2012, 09:14 PM
Pierce, this is why new SDC President Tom Curtis needs every SDCer's support for the marketing concerns / plan he outlined in the January 2012 Turning Wheels.

Please read (or re-read) Tom's remarks and then lend your support by expressing same to your SDC Zone Co-Ordinator. He's listed in the rearmost matter of every Turning Wheels. BP

SN-60
01-23-2012, 09:32 PM
We talked about this at work today, and a point was made that our cars (Studebakers and others) could never mean the same to the young folk simply because they didn't grow up, and grow old, with them.

Chris_Dresbach
01-23-2012, 09:41 PM
I have to agree that the SDC needs some new, younger members. It seems that even in South Bend my generation has at least heard of Studebaker, but many have never even seen one. I think a lot of the younger generation is somewhat underexposed to Studebakers, and even the classic car hobby as a whole. I know the SNM is trying some new things to attract my generation, but the kids also need to want to check out the car hobby. From what I have seen, it seems that many of my generation just don't care about "old stuff", cars, history, etc. I try to do my part to expose my Studebaker to some of my friends who wouldn't otherwise drive a classic car, but where does it go from there? Sad to say, guys like Matt Burnette, Dylan Wills, and myself are somewhat rare I think.

mbstude
01-23-2012, 09:59 PM
We talked about this at work today, and a point was made that our cars (Studebakers and others) could never mean the same to the young folk simply because they didn't grow up, and grow old, with them.

I agree. The only reason I'm into Studes is because, even though I'm just shy of 22, I grew up with the cars. My family's hobby is Studebakers. If I hadn't have been brought up around them, then I'd have no reason or interest in old cars at all.

Welcome
01-23-2012, 10:02 PM
Long story short: my fiance and I went to the Studebaker meet at the auto museum this past Saturday and what struck me was the avg. age of most of the participants. I was one of the relative "babies" and I'll be 55 this year. The people there were def young at heart admittedly. :)

It does concern many of us ...and has for nearly a decade now!!! That's exactly what some of us have been nagging about to our SDC leaders at all levels!!! A major club revitalization effort is needed as we begin the SDC's second 50 years of existence. That effort is now beginning to show promising signs of gaining momentum ...in the right direction, I might add!!!;)

For me, Iím the 4th Generation Studebaker member in our family (first 3 generations were all employees and I missed being one by 6 months too) and the last darn thing I want written in my obit is ... Ēand he was a long-time member of the now defunct Studebaker Drivers Club.Ē

63 R2 Hawk
01-23-2012, 10:14 PM
My GT Hawk never fails to draw attention whenever I drive it anywhere, I always have to give myself a little extra time when I go to the grocery store to stop and answer questions. A lot of young people want to know what it is. I get guesses ranging from Thunderbird? to Mercedes?, even one kid thought it was a Rolls-Royce !!!???. Old guys (my age) often think it's a Silver Hawk.... well, it IS silver!! It's not a show car by any means but I do enter in a show now and then and it gets a LOT of attention, gives show goers a break from the 100s of Chevys and Fords and most are surprised to know there was a "muscle car" before Pontiac GTOs.

(S)
01-23-2012, 10:21 PM
Each one of these feeds the other one, for example: More 'drives' in your car may lead to invitations to a mixed car show., More mixed car shows may lead to a magazine write up.

A large SDC meet out in the open may lead to some TV coverage, and obviously more public gets to see them on show day. (like the Phoenix International meet)


More members need to drive when they can
More car shows with 'mixed makes and hot rods'
More zone meets on 'main street' instead of tucked away whenever possible.
More parades
More calls to local TV when meets happen
More members on the forums, not just this one!
More magazine exposure, interested readers may just go hunting for a new Stude.

Milaca
01-23-2012, 10:49 PM
Speaking of television coverage, any chance we may get some national news coverage at this years national meet in celebration of the club's 50th anniversary?
As for attracting younger members, it seems hopeless to me unless more Studebakers get lots of exposure in popular movies and television shows. I dont see many young people attending typical car shows therefor few will see Studebakers there. I suppose the only practical and realistic way of exposing the younger generations to Studes is to drive them more often, use them for commuting to work on nice days and use them to run to the store for groceries and enter them in parades (even if they are not in show condition). Just be sure the Studebaker name badges are apparent so that people know that it is indeed a Studebaker! :)

63 R2 Hawk
01-23-2012, 11:06 PM
The only factory "badge" on my Hawk is the little 1/2" STUDEBAKER-HAWK lettering that appears on the bottom of the trunk overlay. The Gran Turismo script evokes comments like, "Oh yea, I saw the black one in that Clint Eastwood movie!" I do get a lot of people asking me where they could find a Studebaker when they find out what it is and I refer them to the SDC.

pszikszai
01-24-2012, 05:53 AM
Did anyone suggested donating past issues of member's turning wheels to school's libraries or shop classes (if they still have them)?

jackb
01-24-2012, 07:54 AM
simple answer: the cars have to get out on the roads more.....I have so many exchanges about my car at the gas station !! Everyone will say the same. The gas station is the donut shop, the watering fountain, or the burger joint for old car interest. Most people at car shows have 4-5 cars or 4-5 cameras...! The expansion is beyond a zone or regional meet. It is beyond 1/2 price memberships to family members.....family members.........reminds me of the budding artist who sold paintings to his family.....pretty soon you run out of family....See Stude parts' prices. What does it cost for a young person to buy a Lark and prepare it for safe drving ? Sad math...

I will be posting on the tech pages today on a problem many here never face...nor want to ever face: see wiper operation.....:-)

jimmijim8
01-24-2012, 08:57 AM
Take your Stude to multi-make car shows. Show the people the other side of the coin. People have been brainwashed into thinking that if you ain't drivin a tri-5 Chebbie or some other overly rated Big Three offering there is no alternative. BS of course. Studebaker invented "COOL" not the club. If you don't attend multi make shows how do you expect to grow the club. You've got to campaign your Studebaker if you are concerned. I give away my Turning Wheels to any body at the car shows that express interest in my car. I don't have enough copies. One question I get is "where do you get parts"? I tell them of the 12,000 plus membership of the club and I also have a bunch of last years SI catalogues that ED Renoylds sent me. I give them out too. cheers jimmijim

Scott
01-24-2012, 10:02 AM
We need Top Gear to feature Studebakers in a show.

warrlaw1
01-24-2012, 10:22 AM
I agree with driving them and showing them up town, down town, multi make meets... Even children are drawn to a shiny sporty car. Hand out old TWs, or The Sudebaker Story and tell people about the website and forum. Be the Stude Ambassador and get the marque some exposure and market penetration. We're aging, but the cars are timeless.

FlatheadGeo
01-24-2012, 10:37 AM
We're aging, but the cars are timeless. Sounds like the beginning of an advertising campaign!!! Great to use as a headline!

RadCruiser
01-24-2012, 11:09 AM
Alright so I am just 24, and before I got my cruiser I had no idea what studebakers looked like. I remember when I worked at Auto Zone going thru the lists of cars as i'm bored and finding studebaker and just thinking to myself "what in the world is a studebaker?! ." I was actually searching craigslist and the web for a cool muscle car to drive around in, but of course stuff like chargers, camaros and gtos for the years I like are wayyyy too much and a shop owner I delivered to told me he had something for sale. To be honest, first time I saw the car, it was kinda ugly and did not really scream muscle (then again with a name Cruiser, I should know better). But the secons time I came up I bought. Just not many on the road like it, and its funny to come up to part stores and have the kids at the counter give you weird looks when you say its for a studebaker. They are just cool cars

Bullet
01-24-2012, 11:11 AM
I drive my car daily and have had people at stop lights roll down their window and ask me what it is. Everyone loves it. My kids both in their 20's are sympathic to Dad, but are not into cars execpt point A to point B. I hand out TW whenever some one asks about the car and I can talk to them. It is an ongoing battle. At car shows, very rarely do I get looks or inquiries, it is the average man and woman on the street that show the interest.

Mark

BobPalma
01-24-2012, 11:16 AM
Alright so I am just 24, and before I got my Cruiser I had no idea what Studebakers looked like. I remember when I worked at Auto Zone going thru the lists of cars as I'm bored and finding Studebaker and just thinking to myself "what in the world is a Studebaker?!"

I was actually searching craigslist and the web for a cool muscle car to drive around in, but of course stuff like Chargers, Camaros and GTOs for the years I like are wayyyy too much and a shop owner I delivered to told me he had something for sale. To be honest, first time I saw the car, it was kinda ugly and did not really scream muscle (then again with a name Cruiser, I should know better). But the second time I came up I bought.

Just not many on the road like it, and its funny to come up to part stores and have the kids at the counter give you weird looks when you say its for a Studebaker. They are just cool cars

Thanks, Rad. For some reason, your post "made my day."

A couple weeks short of 66, now, I'm aware of us older guys knowing the torch must be either passed or buried with us. I believe I speak for all of us when I say we'd like to pass it on to newbies like you and the growing multitude of under-30s we have here on the forum.

Carry on. BP

2R5
01-24-2012, 11:40 AM
I personally think that all old car clubs are going to be downsizing in the very near future. Its inevitable.....I look back at my father who drove Studebakers ( thats where I got my interest ....I grew up with them , which most of us SDCers did, but my father grew up with 20's ,30's and 40 cars and guess what thats were his old car interests were. Its not hard to figure out , just look at cruise nights , they are mostly the same around the country ....the young people that are interested in cars are coming in with the "tuner" types , sure maybe there are a few interested in our old iron but they are far and few apart. I have 3 kids , only one is interested in the Studebakers , he is young with a morgage , other interests that ,young people have today. He is a member of SDC ( because I got him started) and even gave him a Studebaker but the Studebaker sure isn't one of the real important things in his life , thats for sure. I'm sure he will continue the Studebaker stuff long after I'm gonebut not to the extent that I do.
If one looks at their chapter members and just figures how many 20 -30 year olds are in the club this will probably tell you just how big the chapters will be down the road. You can count on one hand how many members are in that age bracket in my chapter and that should be an indication how big our club will be in another say 20 years. That isn't enough to sustain a chapter and I would think that alot of other chapters are in the same boat. I don't want to be negative but I think the writing is on the wall.....enjoy it while we can !

Michidan
01-24-2012, 11:42 AM
I'm glad this comes up from time to time, but I know the SDC will be OK.
Younger folks (I'm 45) don't have time for car clubs! I barely have time to work on the car. Our product - the Studebaker and the fine people that drive them - is a good one. The market for it will be there. Studebakers are attractive and unique. The fact that there has not been a new one since 1966 is not a big factor.
In my 20's I was in the Buick club of America. I was typically the only one at any event without gray hair. And you could buy a brand new Buick at the time.
Couldn't it already be said that the club is doing better than Studebaker as a company ever did in its market?

Honestly, I'm far more worried about the "marketplace" disappearing than the cars or the club.
Support SEMA, fight clunker and zoning laws, and lets make sure that any and all old cars are welcome on the roads of the future!!

RadCruiser
01-24-2012, 11:48 AM
Glad to make your day Bob.
To 2R5, I'm actually one of those kids too. I have a tuner car that I have been in a car club for 6 years with now, but of course we also have some older guys with muscles cars too and not just "rice burners." Those are the guys that help me out a lot now, which is kinda cool that it brought me closer to them since now they are showing me how stuff was back in theird days.
Once im done my car, I think I will be driving it to shows a lot more then my Eclipse now.

1962larksedan
01-24-2012, 12:43 PM
All good ideas.

jbrotten
01-24-2012, 01:07 PM
Certainly there are many factors to this "dilemma", another one to consider is economics. I have a 19 yr old son, and even though he's not into old cars, even if he was it is much cheaper, and easier, to just buy an old Honda or an f-150, etc.
And I agree with the above posts that mention how we tend to like what we were familiar with when we were young. And, let's face it, Studebakers weren't all that popular even "back in the day". I graduated from high school in '79, and my '61 Lark was the only Studie in the entire student parking lot(and this in a school of 2000 kids)!

Jim B

Dick Steinkamp
01-24-2012, 01:23 PM
I don't want to be negative but I think the writing is on the wall.....enjoy it while we can !

I agree with Bob (2R5). That doesn't mean we shouldn't be doing everything that is suggested here (and more) to interest others in Studebakers and the SDC, but I'm not optimistic that we can maintain 13,000 members in the coming years, let alone grow.

I think it is difficult to convince someone who has lusted after a Corvette, or a 57 Chevy, or a GTO, or a 240Z, or a WRX, or whatever...that they should switch and start lusting after a Studebaker. You are just not going to get many converts. We tend to be attracted to the cars that were important to us at the time we were getting interested in cars. Just as many Studebaker enthusiasts would rather "fight than switch", so too would Chevy and Ford (and the Mazda and Honda) guys.

Same with young people. There is not only a big difference between a Honda CRX and a 4 door Lark, but more importantly with the folks that hang around those two cars. The first car I ever did was when I was 15 and restored a 30 Model A coupe...

http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/ModelA-1.jpg

Keep in mind that this car was only 30 years old at the time. I attended a few Model A club functions and even then found the crowd old and boring. I sold it and bought a black 57 Chevy with a 301 and 4 speed. A much more fun car, and just as important, the crowd to hang out with :cool:.

I've told this story before, but at the Spokane meet, I brought this Chevy powered Starliner...

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/S2D%204-06/55fb.jpg

I had an old guy (actually about the same age that I am :() come up to me...look me straight in the eye...and with a quivering upper lip told me "You RUINED this car". I laughed it off, but if another hot rodder had been faced with the same "welcome" they may have been out of there (and out of the SDC) faster than you can say "light up the hides".

I don't hold it against anyone to be passionate about stock Studebakers. Our membership is what it is. It is just that it may not be the membership that young people or hot rodders want to hang out with.

My son (38 years old) is just as car crazy as I am. When he was in high school, he didn't lust after a Studebaker. We built a Scrirocco to run D/Street Prepared auto cross (his choice). Today he instructs for the BMW CCA and races an E36 M3.


http://steinkamp.us/622/bmwcca-at-laguna

In my wildest dreams I can't see him or the anyone in car crowd he hangs with going ga ga over a Studebaker.

So with that said, what CAN we capitalize on?

1. PRICE...Essentially any Studebaker is less expensive to buy and own than most other similar cars. How about that R4 Avanti that John (289stude) just bought for $20k? That would be a 25% down payment on a similar Corvette. A 2 door hardtop 4 speed Lark is about 1/4 the price of a similar Chevy II Nova. A 4 door Lark is close to "give away" and is a fun, unique, nice driving car. Studebakers are a cheap way to get into the collector car hobby.

2. PARTS AVAILABILITY...We are so fortunate to have virtually ANY part available for our cars from a relatively large number of vendors...either NOS, reproduced or used...especially considering the low production numbers. Try finding the same for Hudsons, Ramblers, or other off brands. Even parts for many MoPars, Pontiacs, Oldsmobiles, Buicks are not as plentiful as parts for Studebakers.

3. "FAMOUS" MODELS...50-51 cars, Hawks, 53-54 Starliners and Starlights, supercharged cars, and Avantis, are all generally well known by "car guys". Although some of us gravitate to the more common Studes, the cars listed are the ones that are and will be remembered. Trying to interest someone in a '52 Land Cruiser is very different than the crowd reaction to a Golden Hawk going across the auction stage.

4. CUSTOM AND MODIFIED CARS...Quite frankly, this is the future of the hobby and maybe the future of SDC. I think back on my Model A days. Back then there were more stock Model A's than hot rods. Not today. Same with 36-40 Fords. I can't remember seeing many (if any) stockers recently but I I've see literally hundreds of modified ones in the last year. When was the last time you saw a 50 Mercury with a full height roof? Even 60's muscle cars that everyone was "restoring" several years ago are now being done as "pro street" or "G machines". The one common element I can see over the years in the car hobby is custom and modified cars. Restoring cars works for the age group that knew them when they were new. Custom and modified cars seem to be a much longer lasting part of the car hobby.

stupak
01-24-2012, 01:29 PM
I think 2R5 hit the nail on the head. As kids grow up and are able to dabble with the car hobby, they will purchase what 'they' remember, and it won't be Studebakers. That's just the way it is and I doubt we as a club can do much about that. Look at the posted pictures of club events, and, the pictues in TW's. Most have gray hair now, or, none at all. Young'ens are few and far between. Sure, as a club we can do things that attract a FEW of the younger generation But, that won't sustain the club. For us that collect Studebaker memoribilia, I have often said that IF you are doing it for profit down the road, you better start selling now. In 20 years, the only people that will want our Stude stuff are museums, and, they will want it for free. Generally people will say, what's a Studebaker. Sad to say, but we are a dying breed. stupak

556063
01-24-2012, 01:37 PM
Not wishing to offend anyone, I'd like to say that often the most visible and active members of any non profit creating organization are those who are of retirement age. I know there are lots of us out there in our 40's and younger that wish we had time to be more active. Financial freedom would be the best friend this old car guy could find to help him do more.

I'm also strongly with the people who have mentioned watching closely the laws and regulations that impact the hobby. Besides National regulatory threats (not going there), taxes and fees based on actual value vs. age would be one way to put a collector vehicle out of reach of the average person. This is a state by state or locality issue. With governmental units looking for any way to increase sagging revenues due to lower economic activity, those of us "lucky" enough to own an extra car for pleasure could be easily targeted. I couldn't afford the cars I own today if I had to pay more for taxes or insurance. The preferential treatment many local governments (and insurance companies) give in these areas needs to be defended and protected. Especially if we want younger people to be able to afford to join us.

Overall, the club needs to be as tech savvy and up to date as it can. I've seen great strides in that the last few years. When will we see the new Studebaker IPhone App? I don't know if any other club has done it, but a Marque history and presentation that could be downloaded and/or used to compare Studes to other or current models could be something that could get a lot of attention. I know companies spend a lot of money to develop those Apps, so that may not be realistic. Just a funny thought. Might at least get noticed on late night TV.

1962larksedan
01-24-2012, 01:39 PM
Certainly there are many factors to this "dilemma", another one to consider is economics. I have a 19 yr old son, and even though he's not into old cars, even if he was it is much cheaper, and easier, to just buy an old Honda or an f-150, etc.
And I agree with the above posts that mention how we tend to like what we were familiar with when we were young. And, let's face it, Studebakers weren't all that popular even "back in the day". I graduated from high school in '79, and my '61 Lark was the only Studie in the entire student parking lot(and this in a school of 2000 kids)!

Jim B

Excellent point there, sad to say.

I graduated in 1975 in the Wash DC area and remember virtually no Studes with the exception of a 1957 Hawk (2 door sedan). That's it.

It wasn't till I moved to Calif in 1978 that I started seeing 2 or more Studes: a 1962-64 Lark 'vert and a ca. 1957 Commander 4 door in Burlingame. SoCal the one shop I worked at had a 1964 2 door sedan or hardtop V8 Lark type, Daytona?

1962larksedan
01-24-2012, 01:42 PM
I think 2R5 hit the nail on the head. As kids grow up and are able to dabble with the car hobby, they will purchase what 'they' remember, and it won't be Studebakers. That's just the way it is and I doubt we as a club can do much about that. Look at the posted pictures of club events, and, the pictues in TW's. Most have gray hair now, or, none at all. Young'ens are few and far between. Sure, as a club we can do things that attract a FEW of the younger generation But, that won't sustain the club. For us that collect Studebaker memoribilia, I have often said that IF you are doing it for profit down the road, you better start selling now. In 20 years, the only people that will want our Stude stuff are museums, and, they will want it for free. Generally people will say, what's a Studebaker. Sad to say, but we are a dying breed. stupak

Maybe. And the few restored to stock survivors out there will be the Hawks, Avantis, 1950-51 Bulletnoses, and an occasional Marshall, R1 or higher Lark, etc. Most of the rest of the survivors will be people like me who swapped in 350 Chevys, etc. since those cars can still be kept running for $.

sweetolbob
01-24-2012, 01:51 PM
I'm glad this comes up from time to time, but I know the SDC will be OK.
Younger folks (I'm 45) don't have time for car clubs! I barely have time to work on the car. Our product - the Studebaker and the fine people that drive them - is a good one. The market for it will be there. Studebakers are attractive and unique. The fact that there has not been a new one since 1966 is not a big factor.
In my 20's I was in the Buick club of America. I was typically the only one at any event without gray hair. And you could buy a brand new Buick at the time.
Couldn't it already be said that the club is doing better than Studebaker as a company ever did in its market?

Honestly, I'm far more worried about the "marketplace" disappearing than the cars or the club.
Support SEMA, fight clunker and zoning laws, and lets make sure that any and all old cars are welcome on the roads of the future!!

Dan

That is well written and very close to the crux of the issue.

My son (Jim - 47) and I had the opportunity to travel together last week with just ourselves in the car for over six hours. We discussed a lot of issues but we eventually got around to comparing our youths. It just reiterated the differences in our younger years and very differing perception of vehicles. My era was one as the first generation of college graduates in our family and the need to have a job in high school to fund outside interests and future college. Sports were fairly unorganized outside of school and then only programs in high school. So most of us with outside jobs left school early to go to them and needed a car to get there.The economics of the times usually meant that we drove less than dependable transportation and had to learn to repair them to keep 'em on the road.

There were, of course, the typical desire to compete but without sports, cars became the outlet. So most of us went racing, either sanctioned or unsanctioned, therefore making the car a part of our development during our youth. These are the parts of our development that made cars more than transportation.

In my sons case, His competitive juices were fulfilled from the time he was seven years old by well coached and well organized sports. The cars became just a method to transport him to his next competitive event. He had no time nor desire to fix them so Dad took care of that issue. His education and other activities were more important so cars did not become a portion of the fabric of his life. He watches NASCAR but again there is no inherent need to get involved just watch and go on to the next endevour.

I now have four grandkids, three currently drive and the last is a year away and none have any interest in the car hobby. They love Gramp's noisy unusual cars and like to ride in them but to own one, No So Much.

I agree with Dan's well expressed observations and believe the hobby will continue but in reduced form. It will not be "Your Fathers Hobby".

After all that, I support any good suggestions on how to advertise our hobby as the presence of Matt, Dylan, Chris and others in the club shows there is still a spark among the youth. For me, The local shows will continue to be on my list to show the Avantis.

Bob

mbstude
01-24-2012, 01:54 PM
Alright so I am just 24, and before I got my cruiser I had no idea what studebakers looked like. I remember when I worked at Auto Zone going thru the lists of cars as i'm bored and finding studebaker and just thinking to myself "what in the world is a studebaker?! ." I was actually searching craigslist and the web for a cool muscle car to drive around in, but of course stuff like chargers, camaros and gtos for the years I like are wayyyy too much and a shop owner I delivered to told me he had something for sale. To be honest, first time I saw the car, it was kinda ugly and did not really scream muscle (then again with a name Cruiser, I should know better). But the secons time I came up I bought. Just not many on the road like it, and its funny to come up to part stores and have the kids at the counter give you weird looks when you say its for a studebaker. They are just cool cars

There's hope after all!

starliner62
01-24-2012, 02:20 PM
I get a phone call a couple of days a week asking if I know that our 58 was parked at the high school. Of course I know, my son is driving his car. All of his friends love it and it turns heads everywhere. The downside is that if it wasn't for my interest in Studebakers and any "out of the ordinary" car, my son probably would not know about them. We are lucky to have a few Studebakers in town and sometimes gather at the local cruise in, not often enough, but when we do it normally causes plenty of attention. I know that there was a big push for younger members a few years ago, but it seemed to fall on deaf ears as far as the SDC Board was concerned. James, my son is the youngest member of our chapter and probably the North Carolina chapter as well. Exposure is part of the answer and we plan on plenty of it this year and hopefully years to come.

mbstude
01-24-2012, 02:22 PM
I get a phone call a couple of days a week asking if I knew that our 58 was parked at the high school. Of course I know, my son is driving his car. All of his friends love it and it turns heads everywhere.

Thanks for making my day, Jamie. I have no regrets selling that one. :cool:

bondobilly
01-24-2012, 02:28 PM
[B]This is the same problem that model railroading had in the '70's and '80's. Steam engines died because kids never saw one and in 1992 the new modeler could only remember Conrail and a few survivors. Prices were very high for a "cheap" hobby. Now I just saw a series of ads for some of my old cars. When we made them they were $6.95 and required assembly, now they are assembled, put together and printed in China and sell for $21.95 to $32.50. Same thing as Studebaker parts.

Now as somebody said our cars are coing into their rightful place, the $65 front fender is now $1750.00

We need PR. We need these cars placed in movies and TV shows, also part of an editorial in fashion magazines, and especially we ne3ed our cars in every auto magazine. Be it a small word or two, or a photo essay.

One other issue is the newbie only wants high end cars. They figure if they are going to thow $3000 into chrome jobs, put it in a the top of the line model, so they eventually can get a few dollars back.

I am starting on a small railroad diorama, since I left the hobby a $6.95 switch is now $18 to $30.

The only way to get people into our cars is to kill the reputation of it being the poor man's car, and similar remarks. The other thing is to start showing cars that are under work not 385-400 pointers. People fear to venture into anything that they feel is beyond thier ability.

BB

dnevin
01-24-2012, 02:39 PM
This has been an excellent discussion so far. I'd just like to add that I'm creeping up on 50, and the only Studebakers I can remember from my younger days were the occasional 50's pickup or a lark. It wasn't until I was in my late 20's that I noticed a really cool car with fins (a 59 Hawk) at a "junky" dealer's lot on the way into work. I'd stopped and looked at it, couldn't afford it, knew little about it (except that my 9th grade science teacher had mentioned how streamlined golden hawks were and that they had a supercharger.) But this started my interest.

Soon after, I joined SDC (the first time through), learned as much as I could about Studebakers and decided that one day, I would have one if I could. It only took me 20-odd years, but I'm there.*

I think that many people, like myself, may get into the hobby now at a much later age simply because they weren't in a position to do so earlier.

My fear is the loss of knowledge as members just a few years older than I am now will pass on. I'll be a damn poor substitute at 70 for someone now the same age with a greater depth of knowledge and experience of these cars!

*now that I look back on those early days, I wonder what would have happened if someone from the local chapter of the club had gotten my info and made a personal effort to contact me--to invite me to some events and get me involved--even though I didn't have a car. Would I have found an old Stude for my first restoration then (instead of that MGB which fell into my lap a couple of years later--or the 911 that followed it)? That little bit of effort and coordination (and the potential for a mentorship sort of relation) might have changed my car history a great deal.

61Lark
01-24-2012, 02:59 PM
There have been a lot of good points made, especially driving your cars. If my wife knew how many cars and parts I've bought just because someone saw me driving a Studebaker my car would never leave the garage. What concerns me is I've been in the club for 14 years now, since I was 16, and this topic keeps coming up. Has the overall number of members gone down? Has there been a huge influx of 20-somethings in the club? Not really.

The club should be trying to attract 40 to 60 years old members to bridge the gap between the elderly members that are passing away and the young members just coming out of high school and college that the club hopes to attract. My old boy scout leader always talked about dry rot. An organization or club such as the SDC needs to be balanced. We canít just have two age groups at the opposite ends of the spectrum represented.

What it comes down to is getting the cars out there to advertise the club and if youíre really concerned signing up new members. My grandfather was in the club for over 30 years when he passed away. On the surface it would appear that the club is down a member, but what isnít apparent is the fact that there are four members still in the club because of him.

Nick

showbizkid
01-24-2012, 03:17 PM
Lots of great discussion here!

So far, Michidan's post has grabbed me the most. Unfortunately, personal time conflicts now keep me from attending my local Chapter meetings, which are 45 miles one-way. When I was there on a regular basis, there were a growing number of under-50 guys who were keen into the cars and the hobby. The Chapter President is now a guy under 40!

Regarding the thought that the hobby in general will peter out as the older generation passes, I disagree. Similar things were said about the Model T Club, and for a while it looked to be true... until younger guys started discovering that these were collectible antiques that they could maintain, run and have fun with without spending beaucoups bucks.

We'd all like to see our cars become more valuable, but I think it's good that Studebakers represent an affordable way to get into a fun hobby. When cars are priced so that only old guys can afford them -- only old guys are in the clubs.

Milaca
01-24-2012, 07:49 PM
I did not see ANY Studebakers around when I was growing up except for my grandpa's best friend's 1949 grain truck. The main reason for my developed interest in Studebakers as a child was their uniqueness, style and rarity. I think that many young club members here also like the fact that their Studebakers are very uncommon and unique. It is unlikely that we can recruit the average young adult but instead we are more likely to recruit a young adult that doesnt like to follow the crowd and likes to be a bit unique.
With that said, perhaps our club should try advertising in non-automotive-only magazines & websites that reach a wide age range of persons. Such magazines could include Popular Science, National Geographic and Newsweek (these magazines are typically displayed in city and school libraries).
Perhaps we need to think more outside-the-box....any long-haul semi-truck owner-operators here with a van trailer that would be willing to have the sides of their trailer covered in a full-sized Studebaker Driver's Club decal/graphic showing some of Studes most famous models along with website address?
What about those Studebaker model replica cars that are sold at numerous stores that have a toy department? Could our club work with the manufacturers of these cars to include some basic information of our club to include in or on the packaging?
That's all for now.... :)

JRoberts
01-24-2012, 08:15 PM
I have read through this and began to wonder about how serious the powers to be in the SDC really care about including younger folks in our midst. When Ed Reynolds was SDC President we (Ed, Bob Shaw and I) developed the "21 and Under" project. It was designed to make sure younger Studebaker owners got recognized so they would continue to be contributors to the SDC and to our marque. The program involved organizers of major SDC events. This was to include International and Zone Meets plus significant other SDC events. Organizers who chose to have their events participate were sent cards, signed by Ed and I (as the coordinator of the program). These entitled any person displaying a Studebaker who was 21 years old or younger to a T-Shirt. Those shirts were done by Bill Glass and who sent them out to the recipient. Some organizers actually asked for t-shirts for their event in advance so they could be awarded at the event itself. This too was an option. Over Ed's term in office we got very few people to cooperate with this program. It was put in Turning Wheels, it was put before members of this forum, and notice of it was sent to Zone Coordinators. Once Ed left office the program fell apart. I contacted the then new president about this with no response. I also contacted the SE Zone rep to the board with no response. Was this program a success? Well, I guess it depends on how you measure success. I will never forget the grin on the face to the young man I gave card to at the Lancaster IM. He immediately took it to Bondo who printed up the shirt on the spot. His mother told me lately he was thrilled. I heard of other such responses. Those are successes, but unfortunately because event organizers and many of the leaders of the SDC did not feel it was important enough to actually support. Our new president's comments in the Januarey Turning Wheels were very interesting and lead me to believe that possibly money was the reason for programs like the "21 and Under" project were left to wither up and die. What is all that money for? Attitudes like that will surely hinder any future SDC growth.

TXmark
01-24-2012, 08:27 PM
Our club in Houston is in need of younger blood at 59 I'm one of the younger members, Houston is a big metro area 6 million plus people. I go to a lot of multi mark shows, I've seen only three other studes in the past year, that's out of maybe a thousand cars. I just bought a '65 TBird hoping to find like minded people, don't get me wrong I love my '63 Gt Hawk. I get great compliments at shows an plenty of thumbs up on the road.
I also have a '67 Triumph Vitesse, the Triumph club in Houston is very active. I've been to two Triumph National shows always had fun. Triumph clubs want you to drive your cars, to enter in the show at the Nat'ls you have to participate in two driving events.
I went to the regoinal Stude meet in Tulsa, OK and the Nationals in Springfield, my opinion we need to spice it up a little bit. by the way I drove to both events.
I used to have a nice car trailer and somone stole it, bummer but oh well.
My motto has always been "drive it like you stole it":cool:

1962larksedan
01-24-2012, 08:28 PM
I did not see ANY Studebakers around when I was growing up except for my grandpa's best friend's 1949 grain truck. The main reason for my developed interest in Studebakers as a child was their uniqueness, style and rarity. I think that many young club members here also like the fact that their Studebakers are very uncommon and unique. It is unlikely that we can recruit the average young adult but instead we are more likely to recruit a young adult that doesnt like to follow the crowd and likes to be a bit unique.
With that said, perhaps our club should try advertising in non-automotive-only magazines & websites that reach a wide age range of persons. Such magazines could include Popular Science, National Geographic and Newsweek (these magazines are typically displayed in city and school libraries).
Perhaps we need to think more outside-the-box....any long-haul semi-truck owner-operators here with a van trailer that would be willing to have the sides of their trailer covered in a full-sized Studebaker Driver's Club decal/graphic showing some of Studes most famous models along with website address?
What about those Studebaker model replica cars that are sold at numerous stores that have a toy department? Could our club work with the manufacturers of these cars to include some basic information of our club to include in or on the packaging?
That's all for now.... :)

Two words: Tin Worm.

I'm from the Wash DC area and cars/trucks rotted away within 6 years--------------tops. Hence my seeing very few mid 1960's or older vehicles still on the road let alone in good shape ca. 1975. And Mn winters are much worse coupled with the road salt used.

mgs174
01-24-2012, 08:30 PM
Am I the youngest owner at 18?

TXmark
01-24-2012, 08:34 PM
no, I think we had afellow posting who was 17 a few months back

Bama67
01-24-2012, 08:38 PM
27 year old checking in.

I bought my 1955 E series truck V8 when I was 25. I also have a 67 Chevelle, and a 73 Blazer.

Always been into old cars, when I bought my truck I had never even SEEN a Stude truck in real life.

I think the main thing is that Studes (for the most part) aren't as sexy as their counterparts to most people: 55 chevys, 64 GTOs, 50 ford Pickups, etc.

There is some hope out there guys

sbca96
01-24-2012, 08:42 PM
I have noticed that in recent years the regular posters here have become more accepting of
modified cars. This is a welcome trend and I hope it continues. You might ask, why is this
important to the survival of SDC? With the trends of modern cars, and what the "kids today"
grow up seeing (TV/movies/video games) : a Lark with tiny trailer size tires can get lost in
the crowd of Camaros and Mustangs.

When I installed these :

http://emperorjordan.com/sbca96/images/Avantinewimages/Cover_Picture_Day/L_Covershot2_021a.jpg

I started to get quite a few young people commenting how cool it looked. Here on the forum
I got tons of private messages, email and such condemning the install, telling me how I have
destroyed a piece of history. Terms like attention whore, baby buggy wheels, etc were tossed
around making me seriously consider never returning. This was 2006. The wheels are only
17 inches, which were "small" in comparison to production vehicles of that year. Now a new
Camaro BASE model coming with 18 inch steel wheels, and options up to 20 inch!

Why did these long standing, very influential people on the forum feel the need to make one
of their recent additions feel so much hate? It was a big problem for me, and one that will
stick with me for years. Not any other forum I have been on, did I receive so many personal
attacks for a wheel choice. It was only by way of quiet support from others too fearful to post
on the forum that I decided to stick around.

With a "welcome" like that, why would the average new member stick around?

Tom

Welcome
01-24-2012, 08:55 PM
I have read through this and began to wonder about how serious the powers to be in the SDC really care about including younger folks in our midst. When Ed Reynolds was SDC President we (Ed, Bob Shaw and I) developed the "21 and Under" project. It was designed to make sure younger Studebaker owners got recognized so they would continue to be contributors to the SDC and to our marque. The program involved organizers of major SDC events. This was to include International and Zone Meets plus significant other SDC events. Organizers who chose to have their events participate were sent cards, signed by Ed and I (as the coordinator of the program). These entitled any person displaying a Studebaker who was 21 years old or younger to a T-Shirt. Those shirts were done by Bill Glass and who sent them out to the recipient. Some organizers actually asked for t-shirts for their event in advance so they could be awarded at the event itself. This too was an option. Over Ed's term in office we got very few people to cooperate with this program. It was put in Turning Wheels, it was put before members of this forum, and notice of it was sent to Zone Coordinators. Once Ed left office the program fell apart. I contacted the then new president about this with no response. I also contacted the SE Zone rep to the board with no response. Was this program a success? Well, I guess it depends on how you measure success. I will never forget the grin on the face to the young man I gave card to at the Lancaster IM. He immediately took it to Bondo who printed up the shirt on the spot. His mother told me lately he was thrilled. I heard of other such responses. Those are successes, but unfortunately because event organizers and many of the leaders of the SDC did not feel it was important enough to actually support. Our new president's comments in the Januarey Turning Wheels were very interesting and lead me to believe that possibly money was the reason for programs like the "21 and Under" project were left to wither up and die. What is all that money for? Attitudes like that will surely hinder any future SDC growth.

Thank you for sharing that with us here. It is a sad yet very powerful "State of the Club" message that every one of the 12,400 dues paying SDC members should be made aware of.

TDITS
01-24-2012, 09:23 PM
4. CUSTOM AND MODIFIED CARS...Quite frankly, this is the future of the hobby and maybe the future of SDC. I think back on my Model A days. Back then there were more stock Model A's than hot rods. Not today. Same with 36-40 Fords. I can't remember seeing many (if any) stockers recently but I I've see literally hundreds of modified ones in the last year. When was the last time you saw a 50 Mercury with a full height roof? Even 60's muscle cars that everyone was "restoring" several years ago are now being done as "pro street" or "G machines". The one common element I can see over the years in the car hobby is custom and modified cars. Restoring cars works for the age group that knew them when they were new. Custom and modified cars seem to be a much longer lasting part of the car hobby.

I couldn't agree more. If the club is really interested in getting younger members it will need to embrace customs and modified cars.

parts
01-24-2012, 11:53 PM
Sounds good to me..:)
And also keep the stock restored as examples we'll never see again..

Both have a place..but I'm new here and just want every Studebaker saved and on the road..
They ain't making anymore I hear..

I have had many younger guys fawning over the 53 coupe. Some never HEARD of a Studebaker..yet are doing a 54 Chevy..or a 50s Truck..
I see a couple GTs here once in awhile. The only 53 I see is a Drag Car..
Several Trucks..

My coupe draws as much interest as my 52 Jaguar XK120..

Two of the most beautiful cars ever..and both highly mechanically modified..but externally look original or slightly modified..

Nelsen Motorsports
01-25-2012, 12:43 AM
I got all my buddies interested in Studebakers. The truth is that one of my best friends wants to build a 53 Studebaker more than ever. I now have a reputation for the loudest car on campus (a good thing).

blue55
01-25-2012, 12:57 AM
Sadly it is not just Studebakers. In my part of the world, the car hobby is dead. There are some big Bay Area shows, but I have yet to meet another car guy, let alone group of people, since i have lived here.(almost 6 years) I am 40 now. My 59 El Camino will draw a crowd, but to mosy young people around here, any old car is an Impala. The last time I drove my coupe, some guy chased me down to ask what year Camaro it was! On the other hand, i was into Studes 15 years before i had any club involvement, and was a go to guy for Stude parts. I did not get treated the best, but still a damn sight better than the mopar and corvette guys.
In many ways, classic cars is an Era thing, and will really taper off with the Baby Boomer generation. Parts availabilty, on the other hand, says something else, as there are a plethora of new parts that are available now, for cars that don't fit that demographic quite right. Watch the "Rat-Rod, traditional Hot Rod, Car Culture crowd." Building junk has been in for years, but now many are wanting nicer cars, in there own way. and to that group, the "anti Chevy" sentiment is still strong. Right now, all they can afford is unwanted junk, but with more and more classics up for sale, it may become a buyers market. I might even drive my car more, if i could afford the gas.

hausdok
01-25-2012, 02:00 AM
To increase interest in vintage cars, you need to establish a vehicle that will attract young persons to them and help them gain an appreciation for them.

This country was losing a lot of its best early American architecture until concerned persons decided to teach architectural conservation. It took a lot of years but now there are colleges all over the country with degree programs in that discipline. Young folks want an interesting profession. If a college were to develop a program aimed at a vintage automobile restoration discipline, and if those in the business of restoring these old cars developed some kind of work-study program that works in concert with those courses, some young folks currently interested in the automotive trade might become interested in vintage car conservation. Once that gets started, you've planted the seeds for the next generation.

556063
01-25-2012, 04:57 AM
Those who comment about the car hobby becoming dead may not have grown up in the age before the Barrett-Jackson days. Back when, if you were a car nut, you were considered nuts. Back when it wasn't cool in almost any circle to be a car guy. Back when style was considered dead and bland "three box" designs ruled the day (Ford Fairmont, etc.). Back when your parents lectured you to abandon your crazy hobby because cars would never be more than a depreciable asset you would lose money on.

The present atmosphere in the car world reminds me so much of the anti-muscle car (or just plain anti-car!) days of the late 70's that I came of age in. Back when you could buy a 60's muscle car for $50 because no one wanted to insure them, and no one could afford to fuel them. History has a strange way of repeating itself.

What was the reaction of the youngsters of the 1975-85 period to those dark car days? Viper & Prowler. Current generation Mustang, Camaro & Challenger. The latter being force fed into development during a period when it's parent company actually worked hard to separate the merged firm from anything to do with it's previous heritage. Seems, despite the best efforts of those who want to stop us, the most powerful motivator can be telling us "NO".

I like what those have said about accepting modified cars. I agree the future hobby won't look like the one we knew. But as it's been said, the cars are timeless. Our star car right now looks to be the finned Hawks. The generations may never come together and agree. But the story will carry on in some way. We just can't predict exactly how.

Welcome
01-25-2012, 08:07 AM
I got all my buddies interested in Studebakers. <<<

Very Interesting!!!

Care to share how a 17 year old went about getting all his buddies interested in Studebakers???
Maybe we all can learn something. TIA

bridgegaurd
01-25-2012, 08:16 AM
I agree with Bob (2R5). That doesn't mean we shouldn't be doing everything that is suggested here (and more) to interest others in Studebakers and the SDC, but I'm not optimistic that we can maintain 13,000 members in the coming years, let alone grow.

I think it is difficult to convince someone who has lusted after a Corvette, or a 57 Chevy, or a GTO, or a 240Z, or a WRX, or whatever...that they should switch and start lusting after a Studebaker. You are just not going to get many converts. We tend to be attracted to the cars that were important to us at the time we were getting interested in cars. Just as many Studebaker enthusiasts would rather "fight than switch", so too would Chevy and Ford (and the Mazda and Honda) guys.

Same with young people. There is not only a big difference between a Honda CRX and a 4 door Lark, but more importantly with the folks that hang around those two cars. The first car I ever did was when I was 15 and restored a 30 Model A coupe...

http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/ModelA-1.jpg

Keep in mind that this car was only 30 years old at the time. I attended a few Model A club functions and even then found the crowd old and boring. I sold it and bought a black 57 Chevy with a 301 and 4 speed. A much more fun car, and just as important, the crowd to hang out with :cool:.

I've told this story before, but at the Spokane meet, I brought this Chevy powered Starliner...

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/S2D%204-06/55fb.jpg

I had an old guy (actually about the same age that I am :() come up to me...look me straight in the eye...and with a quivering upper lip told me "You RUINED this car". I laughed it off, but if another hot rodder had been faced with the same "welcome" they may have been out of there (and out of the SDC) faster than you can say "light up the hides".

I don't hold it against anyone to be passionate about stock Studebakers. Our membership is what it is. It is just that it may not be the membership that young people or hot rodders want to hang out with.

My son (38 years old) is just as car crazy as I am. When he was in high school, he didn't lust after a Studebaker. We built a Scrirocco to run D/Street Prepared auto cross (his choice). Today he instructs for the BMW CCA and races an E36 M3.


http://steinkamp.us/622/bmwcca-at-laguna

In my wildest dreams I can't see him or the anyone in car crowd he hangs with going ga ga over a Studebaker.

So with that said, what CAN we capitalize on?

1. PRICE...Essentially any Studebaker is less expensive to buy and own than most other similar cars. How about that R4 Avanti that John (289stude) just bought for $20k? That would be a 25% down payment on a similar Corvette. A 2 door hardtop 4 speed Lark is about 1/4 the price of a similar Chevy II Nova. A 4 door Lark is close to "give away" and is a fun, unique, nice driving car. Studebakers are a cheap way to get into the collector car hobby.

2. PARTS AVAILABILITY...We are so fortunate to have virtually ANY part available for our cars from a relatively large number of vendors...either NOS, reproduced or used...especially considering the low production numbers. Try finding the same for Hudsons, Ramblers, or other off brands. Even parts for many MoPars, Pontiacs, Oldsmobiles, Buicks are not as plentiful as parts for Studebakers.

3. "FAMOUS" MODELS...50-51 cars, Hawks, 53-54 Starliners and Starlights, supercharged cars, and Avantis, are all generally well known by "car guys". Although some of us gravitate to the more common Studes, the cars listed are the ones that are and will be remembered. Trying to interest someone in a '52 Land Cruiser is very different than the crowd reaction to a Golden Hawk going across the auction stage.

4. CUSTOM AND MODIFIED CARS...Quite frankly, this is the future of the hobby and maybe the future of SDC. I think back on my Model A days. Back then there were more stock Model A's than hot rods. Not today. Same with 36-40 Fords. I can't remember seeing many (if any) stockers recently but I I've see literally hundreds of modified ones in the last year. When was the last time you saw a 50 Mercury with a full height roof? Even 60's muscle cars that everyone was "restoring" several years ago are now being done as "pro street" or "G machines". The one common element I can see over the years in the car hobby is custom and modified cars. Restoring cars works for the age group that knew them when they were new. Custom and modified cars seem to be a much longer lasting part of the car hobby.

Probably one of the most well written and spot on post about this subject. I would also add, accept the fact, that as you recuit younger people into the fold, accept the fact that they have children, and welcome them to events as well.

jackb
01-25-2012, 08:24 AM
just wondering about the math: I'm guessing for every new old car enthusiast......3-5 old timers die off. Look at all the chapters....look at this site. Every other week some old timer dies. We might get a newbie who's fishing for parts or value, but if you check the postings, many of them have the car up for sale in short order.....And they usually have other cars that require attention......And this info is coming from the net which has roughly a 40:1 ratio of younger to older enthusiasts.....just rough math.....

and just to be a bit sacriligeous: whats wrong with not being interested in a car club that goes to modified ??? Put the shoe on the other foot. What if I don't give a mouse's butt about a bowtie engine or ovesized tires or upgraded brakes or rear axles....? Maybe I lose interest in the marque and choose another or drop out of the hobby al together......Am I a bad guy ? Who's to say ?

jimmijim8
01-25-2012, 08:48 AM
I appreciate modified cars if they are tastefully done. According to my taste. Some folks can make a mess out of a mod and some put a lot of forethought into them. Saw a 53 chevy truck the other day with a nice cab and what resembled an oversized out house from the 30's mounted in place of the bed. Are you chittin' me. cheers jimmijim

prez55
01-25-2012, 11:30 AM
Simple All members who have hoarded away 5 plus desirable cars give one away with the condition they join SDC. In one week problem solved.

JBOYLE
01-25-2012, 11:51 AM
Simple All members who have hoarded away 5 plus desirable cars give one away with the condition they join SDC. In one week problem solved.

Sounds like a 20% tax....:) :)

As long as there are Studebakers on the road, the club will be in good shape. The fact it's an orphan and there aren't marque "experts" on every corner bodes well for the club.
Simply, if you have a Camaro or Mustang, you can rebuild/restore it without club support (indeed, what percentage of Mustang owners are in a club versus the percentage of Avanti owners in SDC or AOAI?).
The club provides a very real and necessary service for members. This forum is a great example.

It needs to keep doing what has made it a success while keeping up with outreach efforts to new and younger members.

kmac530
01-25-2012, 12:41 PM
I agree with many of the comments. I do not think it is dying. Declining maybe. But not dying. I think one of the best things we can all do is be visible, be educational, be generous, and be accepting.

Be visible in that go to all kinds of cruise nights, car shows, and meets. drive it regularly and has been stated, give yourself a few extra minutes to offer info to the inquisitive.
Be educational in the same way, offer info, rides, explanations and a bit of history if it is applicable and interesting.
Be generous in not only offering info, most important is th einfo and educational help, but on anything you don't want or need, throw it out there. I am NOT suggesting anyone just give their stuff away. But some of you are hoarders. Admit it. Do you have 2 or 3 cars or trucks you will like NEVER get to rebuild or restore that are just deteriorating in the yard? You got it cheap or free and it is daily dissolving to no ones avail? A car or a shop full of parts that will probably die with you and get sent to a scrap yard?
Don't do it. Sell it. There are kids all over the place who want a project car. Some cool little hot rod. We MUST accept modified cars! The by laws of the site and club clearly say that while we "encourage"
Stude power, any Stude on the road is better than a Stude in a crusher.

I started my truck with the intent of dropping the cab on another chassis and making a modern powered driver, but because of the generosity and help of a number of folks here, I now have a Stude powered and Stude drivelined 2R10. MODIFIED YES, but still ALL Stude. I have gotten some grief for even those choices, but more support than grief. I think it is GREAT if you like an all OE car and show quality at that. But STOP being so critical and degrading to those who make different choices. Their are FAR more modified early big 3 cars out there than OE show cars. Let there be more Studes mods as well.
Modifieds will not ruin the brand, they will build interest and keep the brand out there and interesting to more people. I think as we age we naturally bend toward the nostalgic and original things. Let us younger folks build a cool cruiser out of a Lark or truck and fall in love with the brand, I assure you as we age we will build an OE car at some point.

So being generous and accepting can work together. I had some very supportive accepting folks of my project, who later became generous in offering some freebies and some other great deals on stuff, and because of those things together, I am building a Stude powered Stude. Those Generous people did not judge or criticize, they just kindly offered me an alternative that I happily accepted.

I think the club and the website has all of the pieces of the puzzle in place, it just takes a little effort and my 4 idea points and we can keep things going, growing maybe not, but going yes.
We have a number of young guys on the site including a mix of teens, 20s, 30s, 40s and up. You 60s, 70s and up folks-KEEP posting the great help you already do. As us 40s and 50s learn that stuff we will pass it to the 20s and 30s and so on.

Couple that with the already VERY knowledgeable youngsters we have here like Matt B, Chris D and others just to name a few there is hope. That school teacher build cars in a shop class and one being a Stude wagon...good on you. Keep it up.

deco_droid
01-25-2012, 03:25 PM
I have really enjoyed this topic. Due to my not owning a Stude quite yet, I only pop in here from time to time, but I may finally be purchasing my 1950 Commander Starlight coupe soon, so I thought I would add my two cents. I am in my 30s and attend local shows quite a bit -- I know they must be out there, but I have yet to see any Studebakers in my area (north Texas). Hopefully, I will be able to spread the word by driving my Stude around and exposing people to the marque who may have never seen one. I plan to keep the car mostly stock, but I do want to add some vintage styled aluminum rims and maybe add an underdash a/c unit -- nothing radical.

And by the way, the reason I have yet to purchase my Stude is the fact that I am only "allowed" one classic car, and I have been trying the past year or so to sell my 66 Mustang GT fastback, but the market really has been soft. This past month though, I have already had three people "somewhat" interested, so I think I am getting close to sealing the deal. As much as I have enjoyed the Mustang for 10 plus years, I can not wait to own a 50 Commander. I love the design and can't believe my luck in finding such a nice example up for sale. I hope to bug you guys with questions a lot more in the coming months!

warrlaw1
01-25-2012, 03:32 PM
LOL, Droid. I was "not allowed" to do much, either. That was my only marriage and it only lasted five years. Now I'm a lawyer helping others disentangle in a civilized and inexpensive manner. I must be doing something right, 'cause I now have over 6000 clients. My ex was gorgeous but tyranical. I still like stupid people, but not when they insist on being in charge. Good luck to you. I admire your patience :)

kmac530
01-25-2012, 07:26 PM
warrlaw, we will get along great then, I am stupid and I don't want to be in charge of anything.

deco-d,
Great to have you here and I can not wait to see some pics. I hope to have any bit of helpful hints for you but I doubt it. I make up for my lack of knowledge in enthusiastic support though. So its a wash.

DEEPNHOCK
01-25-2012, 07:48 PM
Well....
Promotion is something you do, or you let someone else do..
Sometimes you have to think a tad different about things, too...
This hobby should be fun, and that fun should be shared...
And it needs to be shared outside the Stude club bubble.
Jeff:cool:
http://inlinethumb14.webshots.com/50253/1512338410038087468S600x600Q85.jpg

62champ
01-25-2012, 07:53 PM
One of the things that has always concerned me are those SDC members who have no one in their family to pass their legacy on to.

When I moved to my present location I only had room to take one of my two vehicles. I gave the other to my brother thinking it might spark some interest in him to at least maintain and drive a classic vehicle. It sat for two years and was not driven once. After buying a place where I could park it inside, I asked if he minded if I could have it back at didn't blink an eye at the 1700 mile trip to get it to its new home.

rodnutrandy
01-26-2012, 10:33 AM
I run in to having to spell Studebaker out at shows and also being asked who made it? Studebakers in southern Ohio are rare , me being the only one at lots of shows. I think showing the vehicles and driving them is the best way to inform those around you.

Stu Chapman
01-26-2012, 11:01 AM
Pierce, this is why new SDC President Tom Curtis needs every SDCer's support for the marketing concerns / plan he outlined in the January 2012 Turning Wheels.

Please read (or re-read) Tom's remarks and then lend your support by expressing same to your SDC Zone Co-Ordinator. He's listed in the rearmost matter of every Turning Wheels. BP

Couldn't agree more! If the members don't communicate regularly with their National Board members and Zone Coordinators then these folks will just continue the status quo.
Stu Chapman

57studesilverhawk
01-26-2012, 11:38 AM
If more of us DROVE our cars to shows , to whatever, shopping, Etc. more would see these "funny" looking cars and ask what is it? Some of the problem does lay at" our" feet because we dont get them out enough, Maybe it will rain, it will get dirty, but when we are long gone, will somebody want to pick up my Hawk and drive it? I hope somebody will get as much enjoyment from it as I have. In the past six seven years I have driven my 57 Silver Hawk 52,000 miles, It is working out now abot 10,000 each summer starting in April till Sept, Oct. when our winter sets in. I am not one for converting to more power , or put in a GM or Chrysler Hemi, but maybe if thats what a younger person wants , then we do have to accept that. I relize that this can start something that might not sound good so I will stop now.

studegary
01-26-2012, 01:31 PM
One of the things that has always concerned me are those SDC members who have no one in their family to pass their legacy on to.

.


I have thought about this often. Many of those most active in SDC over the long haul do not have children (examples: Asa H., Larry S., Richard Q., John E., Ed R., Art U., myself [I am possibly wrong on one or two, but there are many more]). Of course, there is an even larger group that have children that have no interest in Studebakers or even collector cars in general.

studegary
01-26-2012, 01:35 PM
Couldn't agree more! If the members don't communicate regularly with their National Board members and Zone Coordinators then these folks will just continue the status quo.
Stu Chapman

I can remember when I was on the SDC Board, that some days I received 30 e-mails, letters and telephone calls related to SDC or Studebaker. Of course, each person thought that they were the only one contacting me. It got so that people all over the country were contacting me. I finally limited myself to those in my Zone and referred the others to their own Director.

sbca96
01-26-2012, 04:16 PM
My wife and I didnt have kids either, looking at how this world has gone to crap I only
tend to regret it from time to time. Such is the way life goes. Out of my brothers and
sister, I am the only one that continues to be into cars. my oldest brother never had
any interest in cars other than to destroy them, my older brother had an interest, but
it faded, and he hasnt even attempted to spark interest with his two sons.

Even if you have kids, there is no guarantee they will be interested, I have a few friends
that had their dreams of Father/Son projects go down the tubes.....

Tom

Scott
01-26-2012, 04:49 PM
Unfortunately my kids have seen how much more of my time is spent fixing up tired old Studebakers than enjoying ones that are ready to go. To them it doesn't make any sense. They see the frustrations, but not much of the fun (come to think of it, neither do I).

Welcome
01-26-2012, 04:53 PM
So, thus far the consensus of opinions to this "....we could used some new blood" thread suggest we should drive our Studebakers to more shows, get them on the road more often and generally be seen by more people. Is that a fair summation???

Ok, keep those suggestions in mind while we make a few assumptions;

Let's say we currently have 12,400 SDC members world-wide, and letís say there is only 1 roadworthy, licensed & insured Studebaker per member (many have none ...many have multiples) and we go out and drive those 12,400 Studes only 500 miles in 2012 (antique/classic car insurers often use 500 as annual mileage) now letís assume only 10 people on average per mile driven will "SEE" our Studebakers while weíre out & about showing them. [you marketing major types already know where this is headed, donít you?]

So at the end of 2012 weíve collectively "donated" over $1,317,500. million more to the Oil Companies (6.2 million miles driven @ 16 a/mpg X $3.40 USD a/pg) to be seen in our Studebakers.

To recap; when all is said & done at the end of this 50th SDC Year, 62,000,000 million people (12,400 X 500 X10) will have seen our Studebakers!!! So when is all this "new blood" supposed to show up in OUR Club???

Plan B:

For about the price of just one half tank of gas, YOU can choose the future "new blood" of OUR Club ...be it a relative, neighbor, friend, co-worker, student, a young or older man or women ...itís ENTIRELY YOUR CHOICE!!! YOUR New SDC Member will receive 12 monthly issues of YOUR Clubís award winning TURNING WHEELS magazine to remind them of your gift and to help keep Studebakers always on their mind!!!

To get the SDC off & rolling into its "Second 50 Years of Existence," YOU could help ADD 12,400 "new blood" SDC Members and bring in $297,600. to YOUR Club!!! Start right now, start right here: http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com/giftmembership.asp

Yes, most definitely ...we could use some new blood ...Letís get started now! I am!!!

PS: I know, I know as unbelievable as it is, the vast majority of OUR fellow SDC Members may not even know about "SDC Gift Memberships" ...because we once again failed to mention the existence of that "membership option" in OUR very own SDC TURNING WHEELS magazine!!!

DEEPNHOCK
01-26-2012, 05:44 PM
How many lil' kid's have sat in your Stude.... at a non Stude car show?

http://inlinethumb01.webshots.com/48000/1512338818038087468S600x600Q85.jpg

DEEPNHOCK
01-26-2012, 06:09 PM
Or a Stude show... no matter..
It is up to 'us' to instill that enthusiasm in the future generation.
And it takes enthusiasm....

http://inlinethumb07.webshots.com/48198/2305181830038087468S600x600Q85.jpg

BobPalma
01-26-2012, 06:18 PM
'Grandson still has a few years to go....but he's getting the hang of it:

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/DSCF2085.jpg

1962larksedan
01-26-2012, 06:35 PM
I have thought about this often. Many of those most active in SDC over the long haul do not have children (examples: Asa H., Larry S., Richard Q., John E., Ed R., Art U., myself [I am possibly wrong on one or two, but there are many more]). Of course, there is an even larger group that have children that have no interest in Studebakers or even collector cars in general.

No kids here either.

sweetolbob
01-26-2012, 06:44 PM
How many lil' kid's have sat in your Stude.... at a non Stude car show?


One of the advantages of having driver quality show cars is the smile on the young'uns face when Dad says "Don't touch the car" and I just open the door and let him set inside. A lot of Vrooom, Vrooom and great big smiles.

Can't say if I've ever made a convert or not but it sure makes my day!!

Bob

DEEPNHOCK
01-26-2012, 06:46 PM
[QUOTE=BobPalma]'Grandson still has a few years to go....but he's getting the hang of it:

Great pic!

But that is 'inside the fraternity'....
We need to promote outside our little family.
(Don't take this wrong, but....)
So many times I go to a Stude event and the same people hang around the same people and talk about the same stuff...
And when somebody 'outside' walks by, all they get is a look.
Or...
Somebody is parked in a fold up chair behind their Stude looking at people looking at the Stude.
What good is that?
What fun is that?
Attitude is everything!
Let's have so much fun that it rubs off!

Corvanti
01-26-2012, 06:59 PM
as a 57 yr. old (as of last sunday) "youngster". i wanted to put off on any comments on this thread, to see where it was going...

in 2011, i had my first year at car shows with a stude - the '40. everyone i met for the first time in april in our local club were just great!!! a far cry from my corvette days, where some had to make sure my '80 was a "numbers matching" (it was), before they would give me the time of day.

all the shows i was able to attend were non-stude car shows. we had 13 studebakers at the first show. that weekend was one of the best times i've ever had.

the last show i could go to was in july - i had the only stude there - (our club area is quite large, and i don't blame anyone for not making it), besides it was in the 90's -temp and humidity. out of about 350 cars there, i did snag the "original unrestored" award plaque.

i had kids of every age all over it... all i wished i had that day were copies of "The Studebaker Story" and a SDC application form, not to mention "TW" mags...

i'm in this for the long haul, and hope to have my next stude soon. for the cars? - yes. for the people that have the cars? - more so... :D

K-Hawk
01-26-2012, 07:36 PM
62lark man. When I was a booster club member my children were in high school. we held a couple of car shows as fund raisers. why don't you organize a car show at a high school. We (the club)- with you at point could organize information about Studebaker history, coordinate with the school and perhaps it could be introduced with history and social studies classes. It would be nice if the school had an automotive program. Just a thought, Any of our club members have children/ grand children in high school JR High ? i was at the meeting too we were talking about transmissions remember,keep in touch.

K-Hawk
01-26-2012, 07:50 PM
perhaps they were all just jealous. The car looks very cool, keep in touch,post as often as you like.

johnod
01-26-2012, 09:42 PM
4. CUSTOM AND MODIFIED CARS...Quite frankly, this is the future of the hobby and maybe the future of SDC. I think back on my Model A days. Back then there were more stock Model A's than hot rods. Not today. Same with 36-40 Fords. I can't remember seeing many (if any) stockers recently but I I've see literally hundreds of modified ones in the last year. When was the last time you saw a 50 Mercury with a full height roof? Even 60's muscle cars that everyone was "restoring" several years ago are now being done as "pro street" or "G machines". The one common element I can see over the years in the car hobby is custom and modified cars. Restoring cars works for the age group that knew them when they were new. Custom and modified cars seem to be a much longer lasting part of the car hobby.

I think this is hit the nail right on the head.

BobPalma
01-26-2012, 10:05 PM
'Grandson still has a few years to go....but he's getting the hang of it:

Great pic!

But that is 'inside the fraternity'....We need to promote outside our little family.
(Don't take this wrong, but....)

Let's have so much fun that it rubs off!


'No offense taken Jeff; I've had that pic for some time and it looked like a good time to post it just for fun.

If you want to see Stude guys having so much fun while doing missionary work that it rubs off, make the trip to The Pure Stock Drags some year if you possibly can. (I know it's a long way.)

The fun rubs off figuratively in the pits...and literally at the starting line. <GGG> BP

Milaca
01-26-2012, 10:40 PM
So many times I go to a Stude event and the same people hang around the same people and talk about the same stuff...
And when somebody 'outside' walks by, all they get is a look.
Or...
Somebody is parked in a fold up chair behind their Stude looking at people looking at the Stude.
What good is that?
What fun is that?
Attitude is everything!
Let's have so much fun that it rubs off!

This sounds like a typical car show, though not necessarily a Studebaker car show.
Perhaps we need to have more Studebaker cruises/driving tours? Everyone is happy when sitting in their Studebaker and driving it with the breeze coming through the front fender vents and the radio playing a tune. Make stops along the way at gas stations, ice cream stands, rest areas, etc. where the general public (many of whom do not attend car shows) can get a good look at your car while they go about their daily routine. Be a little more spontaneous and carefree with our Studes. :)

Skinnys Garage
01-27-2012, 12:45 AM
.....Be a little more spontaneous and carefree with our Studes. :)
You mean like letting some "Lark Nerd" you met on a Studebaker forum drive your Hawk to the local Dairy Queen?:cool:

JBOYLE
01-27-2012, 12:55 AM
But that is 'inside the fraternity'....
We need to promote outside our little family.
(Don't take this wrong, but....)
So many times I go to a Stude event and the same people hang around the same people and talk about the same stuff...
And when somebody 'outside' walks by, all they get is a look.
Or...
Somebody is parked in a fold up chair behind their Stude looking at people looking at the Stude.
What good is that?
What fun is that?
Attitude is everything!
Let's have so much fun that it rubs off!


Amen.
After 20 years in PR, I'm not shy about talking to people at car shows.
Last fall our chapter sponsored an all-make car show up at the nearby orchard during harvest time.

I stayed close to the Avanti and answered a lot of questions. For my effort, my car won the "People's Choice" award.
One person in our chapter accused me of politicing, trying too hard to get the award.
No, it really wasn't that, I was trying to inform the passer's by. Really.
With a car as unusual as a Stude, we've got to interact with the crowd if we want to make the cars more popular and better known.

Kurt
01-27-2012, 05:35 AM
I will speak for myself, and tell you all, that it was Turning Wheels that lured me into the Studebaker fold. Not the cars.... My Grandfather was an SDC member and I read his turning wheels second hand. The love for the hobby and the cars grew out of that. I joined SDC myself in 1992, bought my first Studebaker in 1996, and haven't looked back. This particular thread got me to thinkin.............




QUOTE=Welcome;615152] So, thus far the consensus of opinions to this "....we could used some new blood" thread suggest we should drive our Studebakers to more shows, get them on the road more often and generally be seen by more people. Is that a fair summation???

Ok, keep those suggestions in mind while we make a few assumptions;

Let's say we currently have 12,400 SDC members world-wide, and letís say there is only 1 roadworthy, licensed & insured Studebaker per member (many have none ...many have multiples) and we go out and drive those 12,400 Studes only 500 miles in 2012 (antique/classic car insurers often use 500 as annual mileage) now letís assume only 10 people on average per mile driven will "SEE" our Studebakers while weíre out & about showing them. [you marketing major types already know where this is headed, donít you?]

So at the end of 2012 weíve collectively "donated" over $1,317,500. million more to the Oil Companies (6.2 million miles driven @ 16 a/mpg X $3.40 USD a/pg) to be seen in our Studebakers.

To recap; when all is said & done at the end of this 50th SDC Year, 62,000,000 million people (12,400 X 500 X10) will have seen our Studebakers!!! So when is all this "new blood" supposed to show up in OUR Club???

Plan B:

For about the price of just one half tank of gas, YOU can choose the future "new blood" of OUR Club ...be it a relative, neighbor, friend, co-worker, student, a young or older man or women ...itís ENTIRELY YOUR CHOICE!!! YOUR New SDC Member will receive 12 monthly issues of YOUR Clubís award winning TURNING WHEELS magazine to remind them of your gift and to help keep Studebakers always on their mind!!!

To get the SDC off & rolling into its "Second 50 Years of Existence," YOU could help ADD 12,400 "new blood" SDC Members and bring in $297,600. to YOUR Club!!! Start right now, start right here: http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com/giftmembership.asp

Yes, most definitely ...we could use some new blood ...Letís get started now! I am!!!

PS: I know, I know as unbelievable as it is, the vast majority of OUR fellow SDC Members may not even know about "SDC Gift Memberships" ...because we once again failed to mention the existence of that "membership option" in OUR very own SDC TURNING WHEELS magazine!!![/QUOTE]

JRoberts
01-27-2012, 06:45 AM
I agree that the Turning Wheels magazine is a great calling card. That being said, what does it say to a new member when it takes 60 to 90 days after his dues have been paid to get his first issue? I know that "Welcome" on this forum is working to improve this and I applaud him for it. Ir would seem to me that if we want to keep the new folks that join us, we should treat them better than that, maybe even sending their first issue via first class postage so they can get it right away. As a group we MUST look at details like this a take quick action to correct such problems. At the present time I do not see us doing that.

Blue 15G
01-27-2012, 08:10 AM
We talked about this at work today, and a point was made that our cars (Studebakers and others) could never mean the same to the young folk simply because they didn't grow up, and grow old, with them.

I agree totally with SN-60. And the time I grew up in is gone forever. In the late 50s and all through the 60s, even 70s, you knew your local mechanic and it was a regular ritual going to the "gas station" on Saturday mornings to get your routine maintenance, oil changes, etc. Going on these trips along with Dad were always interesting for a young car nut like myself because the mechanic was always willing to let you watch repair procedures if you were so inclined, and glad to answer questions about cars and help you to learn. You aren't even allowed to be present when your car is being worked on today. Not to mention that the cars were so much more intersting back then to begin with. Today, cars are, by and large, merely looked upon as appliances and why would any youngster have much interest in them when there are computers, etc., to play with? Further, it was relatively easy back then for those mechanically inclined (or even not, but willing to learn), how to do a lot of repairs yourself at home and become a decent "shade-tree" mechanic. Working on projects at home, automotive or otherwise, has largely fallen by the wayside as a hobby or pastime, and it's more about going to soccer games, etc. It's sad but I don't know that there is any real solution.

Dave Bonn
"54 Champion starliner

jackb
01-27-2012, 08:19 AM
fact: right now Detroit is in quite a quandry....why ? Young people don't even want to own cars !

deco_droid
01-27-2012, 12:42 PM
I agree totally with SN-60. And the time I grew up in is gone forever. In the late 50s and all through the 60s, even 70s, you knew your local mechanic and it was a regular ritual going to the "gas station" on Saturday mornings to get your routine maintenance, oil changes, etc. Going on these trips along with Dad were always interesting for a young car nut like myself because the mechanic was always willing to let you watch repair procedures if you were so inclined, and glad to answer questions about cars and help you to learn. You aren't even allowed to be present when your car is being worked on today. Not to mention that the cars were so much more intersting back then to begin with. Today, cars are, by and large, merely looked upon as appliances and why would any youngster have much interest in them when there are computers, etc., to play with? Further, it was relatively easy back then for those mechanically inclined (or even not, but willing to learn), how to do a lot of repairs yourself at home and become a decent "shade-tree" mechanic. Working on projects at home, automotive or otherwise, has largely fallen by the wayside as a hobby or pastime, and it's more about going to soccer games, etc. It's sad but I don't know that there is any real solution.

Dave Bonn
"54 Champion starliner

...and I agree with both of you. I was born in the 1970s, but I have no love for technology like most people my age. My wife and I buy most of our furniture at antique malls where we buy REAL oak solid wood furniture, for one example. Most things made today are so cheap and disposable, it's ridiculous -- I decided about 20 years ago when I started making my own money, why should I spend it on things that aren't going to last?

After my last daily driver car was ten years old, I decided to sell it and get something small and fun, and decided on a five speed Mazda 3 hatchback (first japanese car by the way). Not three years into owning it and the a/c compressor basically exploded. The estimates to get it running again ranged from $1500-$2000 and the part itself was about $400. I said forget it, I am not spending money on this thing when they can't even produce something as simple as an a/c compressor. The warranty, by the way, had expired like 6 months previous to this, of course. So every summer i've had to go without a/c, but I guess that is how stubborn I am. I decided my next "new" daily driver car is going to be an old car. I'm just sick of new expensive things being made on the cheap.

So anyway, I said all that to say, I'm with you guys -- and I too am somewhat discouraged by the lack of interest of today's kids in cars, or even in driving! Up until the last 10 or 15 years, getting out of the house and driving around and doing things was fun to teens. I would love to somehow see those simpler times come back...

556063
01-27-2012, 01:35 PM
Give it time. The pendulum will swing. At least today's youth has some real, new performance cars to drool over.

I was born the same year that Studebaker left South Bend. When I graduated from High School (very early 80's), new car performance was dead, buried under a sea of vacuum hoses and charcoal canisters. And most all people made fun of my Studebaker. In that respect, things were worse then.

I've been discussing selling some of my cars with the family. My girls have never really said much, until I said that. Come to find out, their friends like them. Especially the boys (getting more important recently, ahem....).

Very few 16-24 year olds keep the same behaviors and preferences when they get past 40.

kmac530
01-27-2012, 02:49 PM
Welcome and Kurt,
I agree that a gift subscription is a GREAT idea, but only if someone shows a hint of interest in the hobby or seems to like your car/truck. I guarantee I know a number of people who would get the TW issues in the mail and likely think it was just junk mail and chuck it. If a friend/family likes your vehicles and shows interest, THEN a TW subscription and membership may play a great role in building interest.

So again to build interest it takes people SEEING the cars. Whether that is showing it to them in your garage whenever anyone visits or if that is out at shows and cruises.

Your mathmetical calculations on the cost/reward of driving forgets a KEY factor....then enjoyment of driving and talking about a STUDE !
I have paid well over $100k on my motocross passion. A new bike every 2 years for 20+ years, maintanance parts and supplies, wear parts, gear, race entry fees, practice track fees and memberships, and travel to and from tracks and deserts....probably over $250k in reality, even not counting medical bills.....and lost time at work from injuries. Counting that stuff, 1/2m, count in what my insurance has paid in and I am over 1m

I have done it GLADLY because of the love of doing it. Paying for insurance and fuel in my Stude will not be simply an expense or labor of love, it is going to be a JOY that I am sure will keep me smiling. That is a reward to me, on top of opening opportunities to talk about and show off the brand. THEN give a subscription to interested friends. jmho.

starliner62
01-27-2012, 03:34 PM
I agree and disagree to a point about todays kids. While I know where my kid got his knowledge about Studebakers, there are others like him around here. A few days ago, a friend of his gave him a ride home and he was driving an early Dodge Dart. This kid's Dad is a Mopar nut. There are a number of older cars in the high school parking lot. Maybe it is a regional thing. At least, the way I see it, some of us are passing on the torch to younger guys. I'm sure that when my sons provisional license is upgraded, I'll see a mob of kids riding in a Studebaker.

Kurt
01-27-2012, 03:52 PM
I agree. The person needs to be into cars or the hobby. Not necessarily Studebakers though. Ihad 0 interest in them.... They were too odd for my tastes at the time. Even Grandpa called the 51 a two row corn picker....... It was Turning Wheels that sparked my interest. What pushed me over the top was the year the International Meet was in Springfield MO. I think it was 1991. I called the meet chairman, Cliff Taylor, from a phone number listed in Turning Wheels. He talked me into coming. Keep In mind in 1991 I was 25 years old. I went, met Cliff,he took my picture with his car, and gave me a meet belt buckle. Other guys I met were equally encouraging. On my home my young wife and could not get over how nice these "old guys" were. I joined the club shortly after that. So it was turning wheels that lit the spark. A better idea maybe would be to give our old issues to other car friends. I know I have 20 years worth laying around my house.

jackb
01-27-2012, 04:46 PM
and ..........another reality check: whatever kind of Studebaker anybody is looking at is going to be immediately and truly unsafe to drive. Try selling that to a pair of parents worried about booze, drugs, etc.......very tough sell....

63 R2 Hawk
01-27-2012, 05:15 PM
I drove my Hawk to the Post Office today and three people stopped me to talk about it. One guy used to have a Packard so was pretty familiar with Studebaker. Another guy wanted to know what it was and just couldn't get over how "cool" my car was. Even got a few thumbs up from some young ladies.... ; )

K-Hawk
01-27-2012, 09:45 PM
I was recently at a stude event and the owner of a hawk was answering my questions about his engine conversion , blah blah blah and asked me to vote for his car. I told him I had already voted for a 1955 stude that was a little frumpy but looked like a running barn find very cool. He just walked away pretty tacky.

K-Hawk
01-27-2012, 09:48 PM
jack b the positive side of that is can't drive what isn't running, keep kids at home fixing it.

K-Hawk
01-27-2012, 09:49 PM
KURT find a high school in your area with an automotive program they would love to have them.

woodysrods
01-28-2012, 10:31 AM
A lot has been said on this thread.
And I agee with most of it.
I too am 59 and have been into cars since I was 9yrs old when car picture wheels came out in Jello.
I have been in the Vintage Car Club of Canada, A steetrod Car Club and a Custom car club, before becoming an SDC member.
My mother hade a Bullet Nose when I was very young and I always loved the styling of Avani's and C/K 's.
But ironically my first Studebaker was an M Series that I knew nothing about, except that I used to refer to them as those "cross eyed trucks" whenever I saw one in a farmers field.
I was going to kee this post short?????
I do think that the only way to get young people back to the marque is to promote the fact that it is an opportunity to do and be something different than everybody else is doing. And that in the big picture it is not as expensive as most people make it out to be.
Studebakers are still very plentiful and definitely a lot cheaper to purchase than a lot of other memorable cars...ie Cameros, Msutangs, Corvettes etc.
You just had to watch the Barrett Jackson to realize that.
But that being said I still get scorned at the Car Club meetings I attend (other than the SDC meetings) for owning a Studebaker. But we still have 3 in our collection now and I want more. And the most car club fun we are having these days is with the SDC, even if its membership is Old!
Good Roads
Brian
rr bu e

Bob Bryant
01-28-2012, 11:14 AM
Having belonged to a large multi-make car club for years, I agree with Brian. I joined the club before I bought my Studebaker. After I bought it a fellow member asked my why we bought it? I told him because we liked it! With around 200 members our car was the only post-War II Studebaker actively seen. Having presented a program on Raymond Loewy and another on the Avanti and being at many shows, I was referred to as the Studebaker expert! I smiled when I heard it. I would be scared to provide a program to the SDC forum members, as I would certainly not be considered an expert! I was pleased when the former local club president who had several cars bought his first Studebaker. He had his wife check out our Avanti which she liked, but she felt it would be difficult for her to enter and exit. Visibility helps the marque!

studegary
01-28-2012, 02:01 PM
I agree and disagree to a point about todays kids. While I know where my kid got his knowledge about Studebakers, there are others like him around here. A few days ago, a friend of his gave him a ride home and he was driving an early Dodge Dart. This kid's Dad is a Mopar nut. There are a number of older cars in the high school parking lot. Maybe it is a regional thing. At least, the way I see it, some of us are passing on the torch to younger guys. I'm sure that when my sons provisional license is upgraded, I'll see a mob of kids riding in a Studebaker.

Does NC have mandatory insurance and annual state inspections for all cars, no matter what age? This and climate have a bearing on how many older cars are driven by younger people.

studegary
01-28-2012, 02:04 PM
and ..........another reality check: whatever kind of Studebaker anybody is looking at is going to be immediately and truly unsafe to drive. Try selling that to a pair of parents worried about booze, drugs, etc.......very tough sell....

This reminds me of a decade ago when I sold my 1989 Thunderbird. I ordered the car new and fanatically maintained it. I sold it to a family in the area. The wife made her husband drive it and wouldn't allow her teen age children to drive it because it didn't have air bags.

(S)
01-28-2012, 02:21 PM
Try taking your TW to the parts store, doctor office etc, and tell them to give it away after a week or 2 of being looked at.

If only 6,000 members did this, wow!

Corvanti
01-28-2012, 04:27 PM
Does NC have mandatory insurance and annual state inspections for all cars, no matter what age? This and climate have a bearing on how many older cars are driven by younger people.

Mr. L.
in NC, vehicles 35 years or older are exempt from yearly inspections. however, any vehicle from out of state has to have the "proper" paperwork (title, etc) that satisfies a "dmv investigator", before it can be titled in the state. both of my studebakers were from out of state and had to go through this process. the investigator mainly checks the serial number to make sure it's not stolen. i had a problem with my avanti because he couldn't find the "hidden" serial number. it took 2 trips to resolve that problem. i recall jamie had problems with his purchase from matthew due to bill of sale/title issues that are different in NC than GA.

mandatory insurance is required in NC, however there are many that show "proof of insurance" at the dmv, then stop paying the insurance company, therefore have no insurance. this has increased significantly due to our influx of, ahem, "immigrants" :rolleyes:. one will get insurance, and the vehicle will be driven by folks that have no license.
a uninsured or underinsured premium is a must...

jamie, joe, jack, and others add anything i may have left out. :)

64 Challenger
01-29-2012, 01:39 AM
I'm 44 with a family. I'm restoring a 1964 Challenger 2-door sedan. It is being converted to a 299 cu.in. R1, 4 spd. car. If I did have help from a friend that's a vendor and my father, this wouldn't have happened. This hobby is NOT cheap. I'd agree Studebaker's are more reasonable to buy/restore than anything the Big Three put out. These kids today would rather spend their money going out, or on themselves. I grew up learning how to work on cars from my father and grandfather. My 17 year old son has zero interest in learning, it's just not "cool" to work on an old car. Leaves the future of the hobby uncertain for sure.

aarrggh
01-29-2012, 11:35 AM
Seems i get the best Stude talk when bumping into people at the car wash or gas station or even just leaving my garage door open with the car sticking out a bit . . What is that they say .

sbca96
01-29-2012, 03:21 PM
.... or even just leaving my garage door open with the car sticking out a bit . . What is that they say .

Here is yet another thing that the modern life has ruined. I live in an Association that does not
allow the garage door to be left open when not in use, nor does it allow any jacking up of the
car in the driveway. My psycho next door neighbor (who has assaulted my dad and I and also
threatened to kill me) does not care for my car hobby (though I'd lived here for 6 years before
he moved his dysfunctional family in). When I do anything on my car he is out there with his
digital camera taking pictures to submit to the HOA. Cars and the car hobby are seen by Prius
Generationites to be disruptive and an eye sore. They see it has ruining the environment, as I
mentioned earlier .. this is thanks to celebrities pounding this into daily
life for the last decade. For some reason its "better" to buy a foreign car using new material
carrying hundreds of pounds of toxic chemicals that has no plan for disposal than restoring
one of the many already built cars spread across this once great Country.

What IS recycling? Crushing or Resto-modding?

Tom

clonelark
01-30-2012, 09:10 AM
Been hooked on cars since i rode my bicycle to the drag races back in the early fiftys 50. Coolest car there for me was a 54 Oldsmobile that really smoked the tires, even remember the guys name to this day, Don East. Saw a 52 Studebaker run and a year or two later saw a 56 Golden Hawk run. But what really got me into Studebakers was Hot Rod Magazine, and Bonneville. The 53-55 Studebakers were so cool with racing disc. Who could not love a 53-55 C or K. Along the way i also fell in love with Bullet Nose Studes. I have a 54 K now and have had it for several years, also have a 51 Business coupe, But never got into Larks till i went to the South Bend swap meet, and saw a black 64 Lark with racing slicks on it.
So my take on it is, You can hardly force anyone into the club unless he has seen a Studebaker. We need to get out to more than just Studebaker meets with our cars. Make the National meets on weekends also, so people can see them. Most people work from monday to friday. Why can't we get this thru the the officers heads. I've heard all the reasons why they don't want to do it, just if you want new meat (people) into the club show em off to the public. Even if you only try this for a year or two.

4jc8z
01-30-2012, 10:08 AM
Make the National meets on weekends also, so people can see them. Most people work from monday to friday. Why can't we get this thru the the officers heads. I've heard all the reasons why they don't want to do it, just if you want new meat (people) into the club show em off to the public. Even if you only try this for a year or two.

Exactly. Basically they are setting the club up for failure if they want any non-retirees to attend. How many younger working people have the possibility of even taking a week off for a meet?

Heather

Dick Steinkamp
01-30-2012, 10:59 AM
Make the National meets on weekends also, so people can see them. Most people work from monday to friday..

X3

An International Meet is our biggest opportunity of the year to show the public the finest collection of Studebakers they are ever going to see. It seems borderline silly to have the concours on a Thursday when all the locals in the area are at work. In fact, there really isn't a weekend day at an IM when the public can see more than a few cars. We are blowing our biggest opportunity as a club to show the public Studebakers.

We may have done this before, but it would be good to find out the profile of those that attend IM's. How many are retired and could attend virtually any days of the week? How many attend the full meet and how many come only Wednesday through Saturday for the concours? How many of those that come only for the concours would be just as happy coming on Friday and leaving Sunday?

How about a Wednesday through Sunday meet? Activities Wednesday-Friday. Car show on Saturday. Break the big judged classes up so that there are no more than 15 or so cars in a class so that judging can finish fairly early and scores can be tabulated before a Saturday night banquet. Folks leave Sunday AM. Lots of local promotion ahead of time to encourage locals to attend the FREE car show on Saturday.

2R5
01-30-2012, 11:37 AM
Dick , this all sounds well and good but I like most booked my vacation week the time the International was on ( at least before I retired) Saturday and sunday were travel days ....back to work on monday.It would have been difficult for me to book holidays overlapping two different weeks.Some people have trouble booking holidays even if its not a full week over a 2 week span. I agree that the locals are mostly working while we're having our car show but whats stopping the International from having some kind of evening show , heck in the summer it doesn't get dark till almost 10 in most places.This would give locals a chance to see the cars also.

Dick Steinkamp
01-30-2012, 04:36 PM
Dick , this all sounds well and good but I like most booked my vacation week the time the International was on ( at least before I retired) Saturday and sunday were travel days ....back to work on monday.It would have been difficult for me to book holidays overlapping two different weeks.Some people have trouble booking holidays even if its not a full week over a 2 week span. I agree that the locals are mostly working while we're having our car show but whats stopping the International from having some kind of evening show , heck in the summer it doesn't get dark till almost 10 in most places.This would give locals a chance to see the cars also.

I agree that if the majority of our membership is still working, needs 2 days travel time to get to and from the meet, and attends the entire 5-6 day meet, then we should probably keep doing what we are doing. My point was that I don't think we know that. We should find out, THEN determine if we want to make some changes.

cultural infidel
01-30-2012, 05:57 PM
One thing I love about working on the Stude is that whenever it gets pushed out of the garage. Plenty of folks stop to look at it and talk to me about it. A majority are older guys who had a Stude and remember the good old days. The younger kids who walk by seem to just stare with a "wtf?" look on their faces.

Welcome
02-01-2012, 11:43 AM
try taking your tw to the parts store, doctor office etc, and tell them to give it away after a week or 2 of being looked at. If only 6,000 members did this, wow!

A VERY good idea!!! Who has done this???

kmac530
02-01-2012, 12:31 PM
Now these have been some good ideas.
I like the evening stuff and weekend stuff. I went to the PSW zone meet {I think PSW the san diego meet a couple of months back} and I got there eat like 8 am and the thing seemed like it was dead already and people were leaving by noonish. I guarantee most of the younger generation are not up and out before noon on a sat or sun morning. Make the car show and swap meet from noon to 10pm and you will get much more NON stude folks show up. LOTS of advertising before hand. Keep it more visible. That meet was great, but it was buried way in the back of a buried parking lot behind a hotel.
I talked to a few people that "happened by" the show and they loved the cars, but it was few and far between. Little things can make a huge difference.
I truely thing many kids are not interested in vintage cars...but not everyone throughout time has been interested in Studes even in their heyday. It will always be a limited number of folks into Studes. MANY younger folks ARE looking for a cool project car to build. Many may not even care what it is, they just want a PRE_SMOG car which in Cali is about 1973 or 74 right now. So many kids wanting a simple car to hot rod or build and our Studes are a great candidate for many. I have many young friends who love older and vintage cars and trucks who are just loving my truck. They are out there, we just need to get the kids to see them.

Jeff T.
02-01-2012, 04:38 PM
I usually get in on toward the end of these long threads:)

I have been a SDC member since 1979: I met a Husker chapter member in a local salvage yard after a clean up auction (I bough two larks) and he gave me an SDC membership form and decades later here I am:)

On international meets, I have only attended two: Omaha... the meet hotel was 45 minutes up I80 from my house and Cedar Rapids, we stayed with my sister in laws family. I doubt that I will attend many others because of the cost.

Jeff T.

kmac530
02-01-2012, 05:57 PM
So did anyone else notice that "Welcome" brought up a dead thread just as reference to this thread?

I would be VERY interested to find out what the member count was when that thread was started back in 2008 and what it is now in 2012????
Anyone have that kind of info available?
Are there more, or less club members?
Are there more or less website members?
What was the peak and when was the peak number of members for each?

Welcome
02-01-2012, 07:50 PM
So did anyone else notice that "Welcome" brought up a dead thread just as reference to this thread?

Kelly, it was a "LIVE" old thread for OVER 4 YEARS until it got "LOCKED" just about an hour ago with no explanation what-so-ever!!!

It now appears most everything I POST or NEW THREADS I start ĒdisappearĒ or get MOVED or LOCKED quickly!!! How sad is that when any SDC Memberís contributions here get treated in those ways that have recently become ...so common ...for so many!:( Guess I didnít realize how good we had it on the SDC Forum ...under the Old Regime.;)

Anyway, this will likely be my last post (if it even remains viewable for a minute) so you Guys & Gals keep this Club moving FORWARD and always in an "open & honest" way! And remember, whenever someone new shows an interest in Studebakers, always give them a warm Welcome!!!:D

8E45E
02-01-2012, 07:53 PM
I'm very annoyed it got locked as well.

It takes away the incentive to search for a relative subject in a previous thread before starting a brand new one.

Craig

showbizkid
02-01-2012, 07:55 PM
Jim, you're not being picked on.

Please read here (http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?58758-Thread-Necromancy)for a thorough explanation of why that thread was closed.

kmac530
02-01-2012, 08:18 PM
Clark after reading your link, I am confused why I have gotten hassled by some administrators for asking queestions THEY think are already answered in past threads. I feel they are not answered when I do a search, so I start a new thread and I get PMs not to start unneccesary threads.
Which is it, start a new thread to ask more on an existing topic which adds to our storage space....or just add a simple question to an old topic since 90% of you question is answered already?

As much as I absolutely love this site and the folks here, the site seems to have alot of unneccesary rules that seem to only matter to admins. jmho

kmac530
02-01-2012, 08:24 PM
I also have gotten RIPPED on for doing exactly this...writing a second post instead of editing and adding to the last post, but I HATE it when I have read someones post but then I notice later they have changed it instead of posting a new one. Especially if other have posted in between their changing the posting....Yet I have gotten "warned" for second posting.

showbizkid
02-01-2012, 09:56 PM
Kelly, this is news to me... PM sent.

kmac530
02-01-2012, 11:05 PM
Sooooo, to get back on topic a bit...
Anyone have membership numbers for 2008 when the "other" thread in question was started and what they are now?
It would be nice to have both website member numbers and SDC club member numbers for both years.

sbca96
02-02-2012, 12:38 AM
A few years ago we had a hugely active gathering every Friday night at 8:30 (now 8 pm) in the parking
lot of the Santa Barbara In N Out Burger (Turnpike offramp). I tried to get the Avanti there as much as
I could (I live 55 miles from work mind you and In N Out is not far from work). In the last two years we
have seen it drop from a filled parking lot the local Newspaper reported on and the following week we
had Key3 news (ABC) do a live broadcast .... to just 4-5 of us. I see an older car/muscle car and I give
them the heads up, they say "that sounds cool" and we never see them.

Tom

1962larksedan
02-02-2012, 07:40 AM
A few years ago we had a hugely active gathering every Friday night at 8:30 (now 8 pm) in the parking
lot of the Santa Barbara In N Out Burger (Turnpike offramp). I tried to get the Avanti there as much as
I could (I live 55 miles from work mind you and In N Out is not far from work). In the last two years we
have seen it drop from a filled parking lot the local Newspaper reported on and the following week we
had Key3 news (ABC) do a live broadcast .... to just 4-5 of us. I see an older car/muscle car and I give
them the heads up, they say "that sounds cool" and we never see them.

Tom

One thing I have noticed in the old car/truck hobby is since it's usually the 'blue collar' types who actually wrench on their vehicles; places like SoCal today vs. even 40 years are now way overpriced for most people hence many of them winding up here in Arizona to mention one big destination. Lake Havasu City is (at least till the economy died) a hot rod mecca due in no large part to many people actually being able to live there. And the same can be said about the Phx area as well as Bullhead City, etc.

We still have a huge show at the Scottsdale Pavilions every Saturday with everything from tuner cars to a Lincoln V12 powered 1930's Ford (very high quality) 'rat rod'. :)

Hawklover
02-02-2012, 07:28 PM
With the nice warm for this time of year temps in the NE the Stude has been hitting the highways and byways.............the feeling of getting thumbs up from folks is reason enough to keep truckin with Studebaker.

studegary
02-03-2012, 12:39 PM
With the nice warm for this time of year temps in the NE the Stude has been hitting the highways and byways.............the feeling of getting thumbs up from folks is reason enough to keep truckin with Studebaker.

From neither your Forum profile nor my SDC Roster did I learn where you reside. Where in the "NE" are you?