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Bellingham Studenut
02-23-2011, 01:45 AM
Studebaker Electric Wagon Restoration

This interesting Studebaker is being restored and expected to be finished in time for itís appearance in Bellingham, WA. on September 10th for ďDrive Your Studebaker DayĒ.
Studebaker transitioned from Horse Drawn Vehicles, to Electric Vehicles, before Gasoline powered Vehicles.
Studebaker produced Electric Vehicles from 1902 Ė 1912.
This horseless wagon was in sad shape when we acquired it from the son of a Blacksmith, who restored wagons in Hot Springs Montana. It is very likely, the only Studebaker Electric commercial vehicle extant.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/electricwagon2.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/BrakePedal.jpg

This is a Model 25, as shown by the Emblems that were on the sides and the Vin # on the frame.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/ElectricWagonEmblems.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_0204.jpg

Itís interesting to note that it also had the Vin number stamped in a additional location on the frame, similar to the secret Vin # on newer vehicles.

There were many body styles built on Model 25 Chassis. They were the smaller (500lb-800lb) commercial vehicles available. Bodyís varied somewhat through the years and could be built for specific use.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/expresswagon5.jpg

Working with Studebaker Club member Jerry Gieseke, we have been able to make some great progress at his machine shop. Jerry is a true Craftsman!

Hardware was sandblasted and painted:

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/Hardware.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SUC50160.jpg

We used the original wood for patterns and are currently finishing the body.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SUC50178.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SUC50157.jpg


When finished it will be driven and re-fueled by solar power at the Bellís Studebaker Diner & Museum.
A Restored, Recycled and Recharged Studebaker.
Bringing it back to life (over 100 years later).

James Bell

DEEPNHOCK
02-23-2011, 04:28 AM
Awesome!
A great effort to save a very interesting vehicle.
Thanks for posting and sharing this.
Jeff:cool:

8E45E
02-23-2011, 07:14 AM
James, that is fantastic! Keep us informed of your progress!! Just maybe later this summer after the Can-Am I can check out your place once again as I really want to see that!

More 'as found' photos in this post that shows the amount of progress that has been made so far: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?20204-1902-Electric-Wagon-(lotsa-pix)&highlight=electric

Craig

BobPalma
02-23-2011, 07:17 AM
Very nice indeed; what a find and well worth restoring. Good news. BP

BobGlasscock
02-23-2011, 08:29 AM
Such beautiful wood!! This is an amazing restoration.

4961Studebaker
02-23-2011, 09:05 AM
Way cool, and way worthy of your continued efforts.
Wood working skills of other's awe me.

I know there is much to do, but how do you plan on finishing the wood?
How was the wood painted/prepared in it's time period,,,,,,shellac....lead paint....whale blubber ;) (being funny cause I don't think so but I had to ask.)


I guess really the big question is what electric motor or battery system are you going to use to move the vehicle.
Modern battery in wooden cases with hardware to give the look of a by gone Wooden Battery?

Jim B PEI
02-23-2011, 11:38 AM
Absolutely brilliant in both concept and execution! Pat all concerned on the back because my arms just aren't long enough.

StudeRich
02-23-2011, 01:31 PM
Absolutely Fantastic progress on the Electric Wagon James, it sure does not look like it did when I saw it last at the Museum! :)

raprice
02-23-2011, 02:03 PM
James,
Beautiful workmanship on the body. Boy, I wish I had that kind of talent! By the looks of it, you should be finished when you need to. Best of luck. What you have is truly rare and magnificent.
Rog

godlovsUall
02-23-2011, 02:14 PM
Stephanie & James we are so proud of you & your achievements with the studebaker museum & 50s dinner.
We know how hard you have worked & the sacrifices you have made to achieve this special museum. We love being a part of it.
May God bless you .
Betty & Bob Lemke
Stephanies mother & dad.

PlainBrownR2
02-23-2011, 03:33 PM
I guess really the big question is what electric motor or battery system are you going to use to move the vehicle.
Modern battery in wooden cases with hardware to give the look of a by gone Wooden Battery?


If it helps any, I have a couple of pictures from the Queen Mary meet way back when, that shows a 1902 Studebaker Electric with a Westinghouse Motor on a 48 volt system :cool:.

studegary
02-23-2011, 03:43 PM
C. Studebaker from Ohio used to bring electric cars to SDC meets, but I do not remember any electric commercial vehicles. Someone else brought an electric to the first (1980, IIRC) Gettysburg SDC International.
You deserve a lot of credit for undertaking this project. What will propel it?

StudeRich
02-23-2011, 03:51 PM
If it helps any, I have a couple of pictures from the Queen Mary meet way back when, that shows a 1902 Studebaker Electric with a Westinghouse Motor on a 48 volt system :cool:.


That was probably Barney Radimaker's Car, very rare and in nice condition.

PlainBrownR2
02-23-2011, 04:36 PM
It was this one :p....

http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/Studebaker%20International%20Meet%20Queen%20Mary/StudebakerElectric.jpg

tutone63
02-23-2011, 06:46 PM
All right!!

Dick Clemens
02-23-2011, 06:58 PM
Rich: Barney Rademacher's car was an 03 gas powered.
The Electric at the 96 IM at the Queen Mary came out of Arizona.

studedick from the lower Ozarks

rockne10
02-23-2011, 07:43 PM
This 1908 Studebaker electric is displayed at the Swigart Museum in Huntingdon, Pa. It is one of two built to carry legislators through the subway between the U.S. Capitol building and legislative offices. I believe the other still exists but do not know where it is displayed. Still a resource for evaluating battery and motive power.

http://www.swigartmuseum.com/images/studebaker.jpg

http://www.swigartmuseum.com/

mbstude
02-23-2011, 07:46 PM
Way cool James. Good on you for undertaking the restoration of that one.


I believe the other still exists but do not know where it is displayed. Still a resource for evaluating battery and motive power.


Pretty sure it's in the SNM in South Bend.

barnlark
02-23-2011, 10:16 PM
It was this one :p....

http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/Studebaker%20International%20Meet%20Queen%20Mary/StudebakerElectric.jpg

That '02 looks huge! If my limited local Studebaker history memory cells serve me correctly, that info tag in that picture is incorrect. I'm fairly sure the 1902 vehicles were all built in Cleveland on Garford frames from their nearby Elyria factory. They moved all horseless production soon after to South Bend. Someone from the Antique Studebaker Club should know the exact final move date from Cleveland. 1903? '04?

By the way, great work, James. Looks amazing already.

PlainBrownR2
02-23-2011, 10:28 PM
I know nothing about it or the detailed history on the electrics, other than it was part of the concours and it was in the picture sets at a time where my interest in the Studes was in building a truck for the model car contest. Compared to the Runabout at Omaha, it does look fairly beefy though, but it is built in the same way the recent wagons of old were constructed. :p

barnlark
02-23-2011, 10:30 PM
Definitely looks beefy!

silverhawk
02-23-2011, 10:40 PM
Oh wow!! That is amazing!!! I can't wait to see this beauty again! :D

Bellingham Studenut
02-24-2011, 02:09 AM
Hopefully it will be driving on September 10th for "Drive Your Studebaker Day" and on display at the Museum in Bellingham.
I'm hoping to have Jerry drive it after all the work he's been putting into it.

There may also be another very historical Studebaker displayed that day (during it's restoration).
I will give an update of that one on another thread soon.

It's a shame having to paint over the wagons nice woodwork, but originally it was painted black with red chassis (looking for lead paint & Whale blubber).

All electric Studebaker vehicles originally had Westinghouse motor's.

Note:
George Westinghouse married Marguerite Erskine Walker.
Their summer home - and the place Marguerite Erskine Walker loved the most, was Erskine Manor in the Berkshires in Massachusetts.
Mr. and Mrs. Westinghouse had one son (George III) who married and moved to Vancouver BC.
We purchased a 1932 Canadian built Rockne Sedan that came from a large Mansion owned by the Westinghouse family in BC.
Stored along with the Rockne were several high priced newer cars.
Why would they have such a low priced car if they could have bought a fancier President model?
And Albert Erskine was President of Studebaker when the Rockne was made?
Perhaps coincidence?
Another car, another story...

The wagon wheels had solid white rubber tires (prior to when carbon black was added to white rubber tires) and seem difficult to find replacements.
Black rubber is available, but would prefer white.

Looking for other pictures of commercial Studebaker electric wagons if anyone has some.

Thanks!

James

Drummerboy
02-24-2011, 01:23 PM
Hi James
It would be great to see it at the SDC meet in New West in August. If not, would it be possible to view it in Bellingham? Lucas tire has some white tires available. Don't know if they are solid or not. They are 30 X 3". I have attached a pic and the URL for them. Well done, so far! http://www.lucasclassictires.com/
Brian7584

Chris_Dresbach
02-24-2011, 02:31 PM
This 1908 Studebaker electric is displayed at the Swigart Museum in Huntingdon, Pa. It is one of two built to carry legislators through the subway between the U.S. Capitol building and legislative offices. I believe the other still exists but do not know where it is displayed. Still a resource for evaluating battery and motive power.

http://www.swigartmuseum.com/images/studebaker.jpg

http://www.swigartmuseum.com/

The other one is here in South Bend in the SNM. I find it interesting that the one in your photo is varnished wood, but the other in the SNM is painted yellow. Interesting. I like the old electrics.

mausersmth
02-24-2011, 05:53 PM
That '02 looks huge! If my limited local Studebaker history memory cells serve me correctly, that info tag in that picture is incorrect. I'm fairly sure the 1902 vehicles were all built in Cleveland on Garford frames from their nearby Elyria factory. They moved all horseless production soon after to South Bend. Someone from the Antique Studebaker Club should know the exact final move date from Cleveland. 1903? '04?

By the way, great work, James. Looks amazing already.

As I understand it Garford made chassis for the gas model cars only, electrics were done in house at South Bend. All bodies were South Bend built until the E-M-F deal of '08. (E-M-F/Flanders made there own bodies.)
The electrics resembled the horse drawn carriages so much, only motors and electricals had to be outsourced. Westinghouse, I believe.

Bordeaux Daytona
02-24-2011, 08:02 PM
Here's a picture of the SNM's Studebaker electric that was used in Washington D.C.
This one was called Peg, I can't remember what the other one was called.
I'm glad to see that the other one still exists!
John V.

Bellingham Studenut
04-29-2011, 01:29 AM
Updates on Restoring the Studebaker Electric Wagon


Painted the undercarriage:




http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/PaintedUndercarriage.jpg



Restored the Tailgate:


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/Tailgate1.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/PaintedUndercarriage.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/Tailgate5.jpg



Tailgate Chain:


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/TailgateChain1.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/TailgateChain2.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/TailgateChain3.jpg




Making the Seat:



http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/MakingSeat1.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/MakingSeat2.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/MakingSeat3.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/MakingSeat4.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/Seat6.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/Seat7.jpg


Getting closer to finishing the body.
Then onward to the wheels, frame and some electrical!

James Bell

BobGlasscock
04-29-2011, 08:51 AM
Beautiful work. And that wood is just georgeous!! Love what you are accomplishing.

raoul5788
04-29-2011, 09:14 AM
I am thoroughly impressed with this work. It's amazing!

sweetolbob
04-29-2011, 09:23 AM
You just can't post too many pictures of this project.

Great work, Please keep posting on a regular basis.

Bob

Michidan
04-29-2011, 09:42 AM
Amazing. The problem I have working with wood is that it's so darn hard to weld.

Corvanti
04-29-2011, 10:07 AM
Amazing. The problem I have working with wood is that it's so darn hard to weld.

you're using the wrong welder. try the $89 one from china freight. :p

beautiful work on the electric!!! here's "our" NC 1903:
8929

4hawks
04-29-2011, 10:47 AM
Hi James,
Your doing an incredible job, I can't wait until I can come up there and see it. By the way, how's that little red 56 Transtar doing? There's many a day, when I wish I would have kept that little rig!

Mark

STEWDI
04-29-2011, 11:11 AM
James - your restoration is inspiring!!!

It will be a great day when you can ring the bell ( I'm assuming she has one)and then pilot her (does she have a name yet?). What a great history lesson for all who see her!!

Here's hoping all goes smoothly.

jclary
04-29-2011, 11:12 AM
Fantastic project. I am as impressed with the workmanship, shop, and the neatness of the work area as I am the vehicle. :):cool::)

Please, don't ever show up around my man cave:p...I'd be too embarrassed!:o

StudeDave57
04-30-2011, 01:39 AM
Looks you made a good call as to the restoration shop~
It is turning out to be quite an awesome machine!!!

I can hardly wait to drive that thing...
I do get to drive it, right? :p ;)

tomsamson
07-27-2011, 08:50 PM
What a fantastic project. I'd love to see some more pictures as the restoration continues!

HAWK64
07-28-2011, 05:35 AM
C. Studebaker from Ohio used to bring electric cars to SDC meets, but I do not remember any electric commercial vehicles. Someone else brought an electric to the first (1980, IIRC) Gettysburg SDC International.
You deserve a lot of credit for undertaking this project. What will propel it?

That person was Carroll Studebaker himself after showing his two Studebaker Electrics at a prior SDC International Internatinal at Indianapolis in 1976.

studegary
07-28-2011, 01:04 PM
That person was Carroll Studebaker himself after showing his two Studebaker Electrics at a prior SDC International Internatinal at Indianapolis in 1976.

I remember Carroll Studebaker's electric cars. The electric car at the 1980 Gettysburg Meet was a different car that was owned by (IIRC) Zimmerman. Of course, someone could check their old TWs to verify.

Bellingham Studenut
07-29-2011, 12:52 AM
Electric Wagon Update:

The "Dash Board" is completed (ever wonder where the name came from?).
They were also useful when dashing through the snow in a Studebaker sleigh.
And what do you suppose the word ďglove boxĒ was originally for (it's under the seat on this one)?

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/Dashboardgrabrail.jpg

Hand rails and supports were made.
Currently looking for correct headlight and electric bell that mounts under the dashboard.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/AngledSideBoards.jpg

The angled side boards were finished and body ready for paint.
Sad to know all this beautiful wood gets painted black, but thatís what it originally was.
The chassis and wheels were red.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/Outside.jpg

Outside on frame dolly.
Correct rear wheels are not on frame yet.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/Outsideonforklift.jpg

Loading with fork lift.


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/PlacingBodyinTruck.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/InTruckforPaint.jpg

Off it goes, to get the body painted!
Wonít look the same, but will look nice when done.

Iím also trying to find Solid White Rubber Tires, for the wheels if anyone knows who might have some.
They all had natural white rubber until later vehicles, when carbon black was added to the rubber.

James

avantilover
07-29-2011, 03:02 AM
The only white tires appear to be for scooters or bicycles. Suggest you try Bridgestone or Michelin as they are likely the two biggest manufacturers and see what they suggest.

avantilover
07-29-2011, 03:22 AM
I had another thought, why not contact Diamondback Tires and explain your requirements. Perhaps they could obtain a suitable solid black tire and then vulcanize white rubber onto it making it white, as they do when making a whitewall tire.

BobGlasscock
07-29-2011, 06:20 AM
Getting better looking everyday. Just wonderful.

I agree about covering the natural beauty of the wood, but it is truly a necessity for originality.

When I first noticed the steel rear wheels, I thought it was a clever design for extra traction. Good luck on finding tires for the restoration.

I'm looking forward to the next set of pics.

StudeRich
07-30-2011, 01:57 AM
Looking very good James, I can't wait to see it in person. :) :cool:

studeclunker
07-30-2011, 02:03 AM
I do find interesting the transition vehicles like this. Utterly impractical, but fun if one has the resources.

My compliments on your wagon body, it's beautiful. Like Bob, I'm looking forward to new pics. However, as a dial-up member, would you be so kind as to start another thread? This one is getting difficult to load. Worth it, certainly, but difficult.

Also, the dashboard (or simply dash) was called that because of the detritus that was 'dashed' up by the horse's feet. Thus it kept the majority of it off the driver and front passenger. Carriage, Buggy, and wagon drivers usually also wore a lap apron to catch the bit that got by the dash. As time went by, the practicality was less as important as the appearance. In your case though James, it was simple and to the point, though likely to keep what was thrown up by other vehicles, rather than non-existant horses. Keep up the good work and do please keep us posted!

Out of curiosity; many of the very early auto-motive vehicles, like yours, had a place to attach a pole and evener in case of the need for a tow. Does yours have this provision?

kurtruk
08-06-2011, 01:57 PM
Can't recall if you need a motor or not. Here's one:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1910-1918-General-Electric-Car-Engine-_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQhashZitem3a689fe3e0QQitemZ250863412192QQptZVintageQ5fCarQ5fTr uckQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories

I'd try Coker for the tires. Corky seems like someone who could help. Until about 15 years ago we had Pope Tire here in Fresno that still vulcanized hard tires onto rims and other such work. He was the oldest indepedant tire dealer in California when he closed. Don't know what happened to his equipment.

Bellingham Studenut
09-02-2011, 01:49 AM
Since the wagon did not have the chain and front gears when we got it, we decided to make something close, then realized a Studebaker 27 axle from aprox 50 years later would work nicely!!! Somewhat modified, but still Studebaker.
Jerry being a retired machinist and "Craftsman With A Flair", did a great job of recycling some Studebaker metal for this hybred horseless wagon.

Preparing a Stude Dana 27

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SUC50438.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SUC50437.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SUC50453.jpg

Make some gears with correct ratio, pitch and teeth for required power and speed.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SUC50457.jpg

Mount it in the correct place.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SUC50461.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SUC50460.jpg

Adjustable Tension needed.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SUC50462.jpg

Luckily we didn't have to make the chain from scratch for the non-removable ring gear on the brake drums.
The brake drums have expandable shoes inside the metal drums, at a time when most wagons had a block of wood pressing on outside of wheels.
Top speed was 5-10 mph with a range up to 40 miles.

James Bell

tomsamson
10-02-2011, 01:31 PM
I'm looking forward to the October update on this project. The progress to date have been fantastic.

Tom.

kmac530
10-02-2011, 03:13 PM
WOW !!!!! What a craftsman and a true piece of history. What a priveledge to get to watch this build.

tomsamson
05-01-2012, 03:27 PM
I just thought I'd bump this thread and beg for a project update!

52hawk
05-01-2012, 03:44 PM
This 1908 Studebaker electric is displayed at the Swigart Museum in Huntingdon, Pa. It is one of two built to carry legislators through the subway between the U.S. Capitol building and legislative offices. I believe the other still exists but do not know where it is displayed. Still a resource for evaluating battery and motive power.

http://www.swigartmuseum.com/images/studebaker.jpg

http://www.swigartmuseum.com/

I saw the other one at the Studebaker museum in SB. It was painted yellow. I don't know if it is still there or not. They were built to go either direction,because there was no room to turn around in the subway.

DieselJim
05-01-2012, 09:48 PM
It is still there. I put new tires on it a couple of years ago so it doesn't set on jack stands now. Jim

Bellingham Studenut
05-02-2012, 12:39 AM
Sorry there was been some delay on this wagon, while working on the #1 Avanti and several other projects.

The wheels are rather unique and expensive to make, but they have been shipped to Engels Coach Shop in Joliet, MT to be done by a Wheelwright.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_0195.jpg

http://www.engelscoachshop.com/index.htm (http://www.engelscoachshop.com/index.htm)


This wagon was found in a barn near Hot Springs MT by a blacksmith and wagon restoration owner, who saved it to restore someday and passed away before it ever happened (sound familiar).

After spending a bunch of time trying to find solid White Rubber for the wheels, it seems to only be available in black.
If you look at old pictures of vehicles that age, they were white because Rubber is Naturally White!
Only later did they add carbon black to rubber making it black, but not all my late Studebakerís have bias ply tires either, so we may have to live with it (but we looked long enough). Let me know of any solid white rubber dealers.

We have acquired side lamps needing restoration.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SideLanterns.jpg

As you can see they bottom cap on one is missing and a top is squashed down, but not for long!

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/lantern1.jpg

The lamps are mostly brass that will clean up nicely, but time consuming.

The battery trays are being built with pull-out sliders and the frame is about ready to then be bead blasted and powder coated the original color of red.

Yes, they used 2 sided/directional Studebakerís for the Senate keeping fumes out of the secret tunnel.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SenateSubway.jpg

They even had some larger military electric vehicles.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/1911ElectricMilitaryWagon.jpg

Will try to post more pictures next month.

James

Chris_Dresbach
05-02-2012, 10:49 PM
I seem to remember Coker offering solid white tires. I KNOW they are available b/c a lot of the Model T guys use them.

avantilover
05-03-2012, 05:50 AM
Try this link Chris:

http://www.cokertire.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?cat=343&p=1&q=white+tires&x=0&y=0
There are 5 White tires listed.

Bellingham Studenut
05-04-2012, 12:07 AM
I beleive we checked Coker and a few others who have white inflatable rubber tires (but will check again), but not solid.
The wagon has solid white rubber without inner tubes.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/100_0175.jpg

Chris_Dresbach
05-04-2012, 12:32 AM
Looks like they have several solid white tires available.

Bellingham Studenut
05-04-2012, 01:54 AM
Solid rubber tires that are white.
I’m only seeing pneumatic tires.
The wagon wheels have a hot-set steel channel on the wheel to place a extruded (solid rubber) sheath with wires embedded in the rubber, that get tightened to grip the wheel. There is rubber available up to 2 Ĺ" wide in round or flat top styles, but I’m not finding white.
I'll give them a call tomorrow and confirm.

Thanks,

James

JimsLeadCommander
05-07-2012, 06:16 PM
Hand built Craftsmanship; can't beat it. Quality you can be proud of, what a fine piece of workmanship you guys are performing for the rest of us. I'm looking forward to seeing it in person!

JimsLeadCommander
05-07-2012, 06:29 PM
Regarding the body being painted black: Could you 'fudge a little' and leave the 'bed floor' natural but, painted in a nice varnish or clear verathane type product so the wood grain shows through. I was looking at an old '42 Dodge pick-up the other day that was 'restored' with new paint on the outside and new very nicely finished boards in the bed. No one can see the nice wood grain bed floor looking at the outside of the vehicle...what do you think? An 'old/new' combo? Thanks for the new pictures with text!!

Scott
05-07-2012, 07:06 PM
Try these guys. They can remake solid rubber tires: http://www.cantonbandag.com/index.php?page=Overman%20Cushion and http://www.cantonbandag.com/index.php?page=Home. They are in Canton, OH. Good luck!

Also see this page for a picture of white tires they have done: http://www.manta.com/cp/mr5wwkz/4ef31e612689a7913a22c1b2/antique-and-new-tires.

Bellingham Studenut
05-08-2012, 01:48 PM
Thanks for the lead Scott. I haven't tried them and will contact to see what they can do.
They mention sending the wheels to do them and don't mention having embedded wires like the ones used (usually sold by length).
Shipping of the wheels from eastern WA to MT shop was $540 one way, so I don't want to ship 2 ways back east if the rubber can be installed where it is.
Black rubber is available from the Wheelwright where it is at a reasonable cost.
Coker can only do custom order black solid rubber tires made and you have to ship your wheels out to Tennessee. Installed Rubber cost is $1,298 each (plus the shipping).
I don't want to spend over 12K (more than most of our cars) on getting the wheels/tires done. The wheels still have to be painted and pin striped when they return.
Hopefully they can provide the needed white rubber to the shop in Montana where it can all be finished and returned.
We were also hesitant shipping the brake drum hubs and sprockets, if anything happens to them would be irreplaceable, but needed for proper mount on spokes.

Thanks,
James

tomsamson
12-20-2012, 10:34 AM
Just bumping this thread for a year-end update.

Merry Christmas!

Tom.

FlatheadGeo
12-20-2012, 01:08 PM
To quote the Britcom: "ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS!!!"

57pack
12-20-2012, 04:13 PM
One word, Amazing!
I remember Curtis Publishing (Saturday Evening Post)
of Philadelphia had a electric truck they used to take magazines to the Post Office with.
Don't know if it was a Studebaker or not but, remember the Westinghouse plate near or on the motor.
Thing was huge, but then I was a small kid.

Bellingham Studenut
01-14-2013, 01:22 AM
Another update as we roll into 2013

The wheels have been at the wheelwright in Montana for some time now and we are anxious to get it rollin.

The spokes were old:

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_0176.jpg


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_0193.jpg

Hubs were carefully dismantled to check condition:

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01171.jpg

The rear wheel brake drums with sprockets removed:

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01172.jpg

The Hubs had to get bearings removed:

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01170.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01173.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01174.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01175.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01176.jpg

The bearings were disassembled, cleaned, hubs & sprockets sandblasted & painted.
One rear hub was pretty battered on the back and had to machine the lock ring groove to get it back in. It was so pinched that they weren't sure they were going to get the lock ring out, to clean the bearings.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01180.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01181.jpg


Checking out the spokes, most required new ones to be strong and true:

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01274.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01283.jpg

New Spokes were made and installed:

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01269.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01270.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01271.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01270.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01275.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/DSC01282.jpg


After a year of helping us search for correct original white solid rubber, they were able to locate some 2 1/2" white solid rubber!!!
I couldn't believe it. Back in someones warehouse they found 48' of it, plenty to do our wheels.
Although black rubber would have worked fine, they didn't have black rubber when this wagon was originally built.

Once the rims and rubber are finished, the wagon will be a rollin, rollin, keep those wagons rollin!

James Bell

avantilover
01-14-2013, 03:55 AM
Well done James and all.

jclary
01-14-2013, 07:41 AM
I am absolutely fascinated by the wheel work. I am also pleased to know there is a "wheelwright" business still available and that the manufacturing art is not lost. While in Indiana, I attempted to visit an Amish wagon builder, but when I got to his shop, he was closed.

How about the pictures showing the craftsman using those lock ring pliers and a tiny shirt pocket screwdriver while servicing the bearings? It shows the respect, craftsmanship, dedication, and delicacy required to restore this vintage machinery. Once the job is completed, what will be the process for controlling humidity to protect these wheels from the swelling and contracting cycles wood goes through? Also, will the vehicle be supported to keep the rubber tires off the ground to prevent acquiring a "set" (or flat spotting) from setting long periods of time? My '55 truck bounces down the road for a few miles every time I drive it after leaving it setting for a few days. After the tires warm up, they return to their "roundness," but it is a pretty rough ride for the first few miles. On a large heavy vehicle like this, with those solid rubber tires, I'm thinking that "flat-spotting" could be permanent.

Great work. Keep the updates coming.:!::)

Roscomacaw
01-14-2013, 08:30 AM
Hats off to all involved with this project. I LOVE your perseverence in searching for white rubber tyres! But the whole thing has been great to watch as it comes along. Where the heck did you scare up that horn and light?

Bellingham Studenut
01-15-2013, 11:31 PM
Hats off to all involved with this project. I LOVE your perseverence in searching for white rubber tyres! But the whole thing has been great to watch as it comes along. Where the heck did you scare up that horn and light?

It's actually not a horn, but is the other side lamp.

They were high-tech, with electric side lamps and an electric bell with foot switch.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/SideLanterns.jpg

One of the lamps had a crushed top and were missing the bottom round peice.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/lantern1.jpg


The top peice has been straightened and brass polished, but they require full dismantle and restoration.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/ElectricWagonParts.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1010635.jpg


Unfortunately the wagon body doesn't look as good having paint cover all that nice woodwork on the body, but were trying to keep original.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_4339.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_4399.jpg

Originally they came with a rod that acted as a key to shut off power and prevented theft.
You would insert it under the seat and switch it on.
The final plate will be brass and the key will have a round ball on it.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_4347.jpg

Jerry is a Master Craftsman and he made the entire mechanism from scratch along with the adjustable rachet power shift unit he made.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_4355.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_4350.jpg

The tiller steering handle will be made out of this brass stock.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_4387.jpg

The frame and mechanical's have more to do, but you can see where the battery trays will be under the frame.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_4378.jpg

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/BrakePedal.jpg


James

StudeRich
01-16-2013, 01:48 AM
That is just amazing James, to say Jerry is a Master Craftsman does not begin to describe a man of that talent.
It is going to look wonderful and work really well also. :!:

Bellingham Studenut
01-16-2013, 09:44 PM
That is just amazing James, to say Jerry is a Master Craftsman does not begin to describe a man of that talent.
It is going to look wonderful and work really well also. :!:

Yes and Stephanie is working on the lamps with Mike Yeakel who has one of the best early model vehicle collections in Bellingham.
You may have seen his 2 cylinder Caddilac, or others.
David Engle is working on the wheels.

James

Scott
01-16-2013, 10:03 PM
Not to be picky, but wouldn't the original finish have been gloss black that's smooth with no grain showing at all? I thought a smooth, polished gloss finish was the mark of high standards of workmanship. Just wondering.

rockne10
01-16-2013, 10:12 PM
Scott,
Those beautiful smooth finishes on the electric coaches, coupes and landaus were typical for the electric cars. Even the leather fenders were tight enough to appear as steel. I suspect a delivery wagon did not require that mirror finish.

Peanut
05-18-2013, 01:45 AM
I searched for a more current thread on this project, and came up empty. Can somebody post a link if there is a newer update out there somewhere?

StudeDave57
05-18-2013, 01:51 AM
I searched for a more current thread on this project, and came up empty. Can somebody post a link if there is a newer update out there somewhere?
I do not believe that there is a newer update or thread to be seen as yet.
But I have it on good word that there is news coming very soon... ;) :!:




StudeDave '57 :cool:

Swifster
05-18-2013, 04:00 AM
I just found this thread. I'm blown away by the craftsmanship. Truely awe inspiring.

Lark Parker
05-18-2013, 08:11 AM
I just found this thread. I'm blown away by the craftsmanship. Truely awe inspiring.

Ditto, Swifster.

StudeDave57
10-07-2014, 08:13 PM
This thread is in need of a MAJOR update!!!
(those who were at this year's open house last month know what I mean... ;) :!:




StudeDave '57 :cool:

Chucks Stude
10-08-2014, 08:35 AM
Rereading this thread reminds me that urethane forklift tires, are both solid, and white. They are the ones that are "non-marking" on concrete. Just a thought.

Commander Eddie
10-08-2014, 08:45 AM
I had not seen this thread before. This is really fascinating. Once again I am amazed at the variety of vehicles Studebaker made in the very early days. Both wagons and early electrics. It reminds me how sad it is they did not survive.

Bellingham Studenut
10-08-2014, 12:26 PM
Once the Wagon Wheels were done, we drove our 1963 Champ truck to pick them up in in eastern Washington.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_7269_zpsa11d3b5e.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_7269_zpsa11d3b5e.jpg.html)

We found another person taking a buggy to the Wheelwright in Montana. He was happy to drop the wheels off at Ron & DeAnn Hochhalter's shop in Sunnyside WA (where Avanti #1001 was being painted), so we picked them up there. At $540 one way delivery, it was easier to exercise the Champ truck since it has a factory 5speed Overdrive and does well on the highways.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_7345_zpseebc9cd4.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_7345_zpseebc9cd4.jpg.html)

We stopped to see Jerry and Joan before bringing the wheels over the Cascade mountains.
Yes, there is desert with lots of sunshine in Eastern Washington :)

James

Bellingham Studenut
10-08-2014, 01:53 PM
Once the wagon frame was blasted and painted, we went to see how it looked and took a few parts to discuss finishing the frame, battery box, etc.



http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020744_zps0aa425a9.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020744_zps0aa425a9.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020736_zpsab0983ca.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020736_zpsab0983ca.jpg.html)

It's amazing what an old rusty frame can look like with new paint.
Jerry and his grandson Skyler hand painted the entire frame with 2 coats of paint.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020729_zps912749f5.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020729_zps912749f5.jpg.html)

The front right corner of frame was damaged at one time.
It was pushed down inward and we needed to decide if worthwhile trying to fix it.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020698_zps4a806fc4.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020698_zps4a806fc4.jpg.html)

The battery box has sliding battery trays with handles and stoppers, so it's easy to maintain the 4 batteries.
Since it requires 48 volts, (4) 12 volt modern batteries will be easy to get (just takes money:o).

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020721_zps9a49a661.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020721_zps9a49a661.jpg.html)

Studebaker Craftsmen like Jerry are such a wealth of knowledge!
Learning any of the old school ways to do things are so valuable!


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020715_zps2c239d04.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020715_zps2c239d04.jpg.html)

Notice how the high tech internal expanding shoes were adjustable.
The twisting of center piece expands the lower part of shoes outward and there are inserts that adjust from inside the shoes to adjust them.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020704_zps93fbbeaf.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020704_zps93fbbeaf.jpg.html)

I have such great appreciation for what both Studebaker and Jerry were able to do to this wagon!

James

studegary
10-08-2014, 02:16 PM
Thank you for the updates.
More important, thank you for undertaking this project.
The work looks excellent.
Wouldn't this vehicle be a truck rather than a "wagon" (since it is a self powered vehicle used for hauling things)?

8E45E
10-08-2014, 05:27 PM
Wouldn't this vehicle be a truck rather than a "wagon" (since it is a self powered vehicle used for hauling things)?

Studebaker did call them 'electric wagons' in their advertising for them as per post #2 and the photo in #14 in this thread: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?20204-1902-Electric-Wagon-(lotsa-pix)&highlight=electric

Of course the term 'station wagon' is still in use today, be it on a car chassis or a truck chassis.

Craig

Jeff_H
10-08-2014, 06:45 PM
I am curious. From the early pictures, it appears this wagon got converted to being towed by either horses or a tractor, etc at some point and most of the electrical parts like the battery carriers, motor, etc were removed. I would assume locating such parts about near impossible and I see that you are fabricating a lot of them. Are you able to find old drawings from the museum or photos to go off or ??

What were the steel wheels on the rear from? Seems those were not correct. They sort of look like something from a farm implement.

Bellingham Studenut
10-08-2014, 10:19 PM
Iíve seen them advertised as Electric Trucks and Wagons.

The following ad mentions:
"The largest Truck order ever placed in this country was secured by Studebakers from Pierce & Co. of New York for 300 Electric Delivery Wagons, representing an original outlay of nearly one million dollars ($1,000,000).Ē

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/STUDEBAKER04ElectrictruckAdv_1910-07-10ChAm_zps83491950.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/STUDEBAKER04ElectrictruckAdv_1910-07-10ChAm_zps83491950.jpg.html)

Missing parts and repairs required research of both horsedrawn wagons and electrics of that time.
Visiting museums, archives, etc brought leads and info that allowed us to search and make needed items.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_1470_zps5f1f4a0f.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/100_1470_zps5f1f4a0f.jpg.html)


We found Studebaker Electrics used a platform design that allows many standard and custom bodyís to be mounted on various sized capacity vehicles.
Ours is a model 25 which was the smallest of commercial vehicles and we have chassis and drive train information for it.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/model25details0001_zpsc81ac8ca.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/model25details0001_zpsc81ac8ca.jpg.html)

We also found the likelyhood that it is a 1910 model rather than 1902 (but the model 25 specifications and details bulletin #1001 didnít list a date).

James

Bellingham Studenut
10-09-2014, 12:17 AM
Before the body could be mounted on the frame, we needed to fix the frame that was bent in right front corner.

It may have rammed a loading dock, or something hard where it bends down and connects to the front of the leaf spring.
The bend on the right side caused the left side spring connection to be off sideways from where it connects in the rear.


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020877_zps805d6073.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020877_zps805d6073.jpg.html)

Almost like an expert chiropractor, Jerry knew how it would require bending the front right up a certain amount, to bring the rear of the left spring sideways where it should line up!
A few measurements and off Jerry went to get some old school tools!
I had to question how a big pipe wrench attached to a chain going over a certain size block of wood, then attached to mid frame, was going to fix the other side leaf spring.


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020879_zps6cd4c290.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020879_zps6cd4c290.jpg.html)


After applying a tight chain binder we applied heat until it started to glow red (like the new paint I just burnt off).

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020893_zps413c9b78.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020893_zps413c9b78.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020895_zps2bd76977.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020895_zps2bd76977.jpg.html)


Then I noticed the chain tension getting looser!
So we measured it and found it went too far up, so Jerry gave it a couple good wraps with a hammer before it cooled off.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020897_zpse384b17a.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020897_zpse384b17a.jpg.html)


We measured again and still off some, but it was lunch time and Jerry said it may be different once cooled off, so we took a break.

Wouldn't you just know it, as luck has it, after lunch we measured again and it was RIGHT ON, so we bolted it up!
YES!

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020904_zpsf1a96e93.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020904_zpsf1a96e93.jpg.html)

It was time to take the frame outside and get the body with the fork lift.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020949_zps70b05d8b.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020949_zps70b05d8b.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020918_zps0ed91a84.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020918_zps0ed91a84.jpg.html)

All the wood we started with made me realize how far the project has come.:D

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020901_zps763c0287.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020901_zps763c0287.jpg.html)

Then I realized we were not finished. And how quickly things can happen if your not paying attention.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020957_zpsbf14eaa1.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020957_zpsbf14eaa1.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020961_zps330eab51.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020961_zps330eab51.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020964_zps82083513.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020964_zps82083513.jpg.html)

Down it went and once the body holes were lined up with the frame holes, we placed the mounting bolts.

It was so amazing that all bolt holes line up except 1 needing very slight ream of the drill (a true measure of Jerry's Craftsmanship!).

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020985_zps9a082f35.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020985_zps9a082f35.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020982_zpsc368a254.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1020982_zpsc368a254.jpg.html)

Thought we'd call it a night, but after a great dinner cooked by Joan, we caught our second wind and Jerry showed me how the battery covers would be mounted.

Having a mentor is priceless and brings new energy and support to a project like this.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030025_zps9289287a.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030025_zps9289287a.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030051_zps23f90825.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030051_zps23f90825.jpg.html)

Wow, it really looked different with body on frame and battery box covers!

Thanks Jerry and Joan!

James

Bellingham Studenut
10-09-2014, 02:09 AM
After getting the wagon body mounted on its frame, it was ready to be loaded on the car trailer.

Gordon Bueling came over to Jerry's shop to help load it.
We soon found out the added weight of the body on the rolling frame stand cracked the base board when trying to lift it.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030074_zpsbac3f31c.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030074_zpsbac3f31c.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030080_zps9b5653ad.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030080_zps9b5653ad.jpg.html)


Gordon added extra bracing to the bottom and we were able to use the fork lift.


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030078_zps999c19e0.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030078_zps999c19e0.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030085_zps8e601c70.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030085_zps8e601c70.jpg.html)


Once it was lined up, I was able to back the trailer up enough to get the front on without hitting the fork lift wheels.


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030098_zps87b7f0ee.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030098_zps87b7f0ee.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030105_zps27b8371c.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030105_zps27b8371c.jpg.html)


Then Jerry was able to lift the back and push it on the trailer.


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030116_zps8c711397.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030116_zps8c711397.jpg.html)


We mounted the stand to trailer with more wood screwed to the trailer so the weight wasn't on the small stand wheels and strapped the wagon down.


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030153_zps5611feeb.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030153_zps5611feeb.jpg.html)


Once finished, we were on a roll !!! (click to see video).


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/th_PickingUpWagon_zps2166f924.mp4 (http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/PickingUpWagon_zps2166f924.mp4)


When was the last time anyone has seen a Studebaker Electric Truck being pulled by a 1958 Studebaker Truck?


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030187_zps4a0747cd.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030187_zps4a0747cd.jpg.html)


We made a stop in Wenatche to pick up a Studebaker Boat (company owners were distant relatives).


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030193_zpscf8615e8.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030193_zpscf8615e8.jpg.html)


We made the trip over the Cascade Mountains to Bellingham without a charge, or any problems, but got lots of looks.


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030189_zps60bb7b01.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030189_zps60bb7b01.jpg.html)


Once home, the wagon couldn't be unloaded without adding the wheels, then removing the stand and rolling it off.


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030221_zps41aa63f9.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030221_zps41aa63f9.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030266_zps017896cc.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030266_zps017896cc.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030235_zpscb67d192.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030235_zpscb67d192.jpg.html)


Dave Gahlbeck came over the next day and we got the remaining wheels on and the wagon off the car trailer. Thanks Dave!


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030305_zps0e75e0d1.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030305_zps0e75e0d1.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030328_zps646cfdf4.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030328_zps646cfdf4.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030376_zps84cfd63e.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030376_zps84cfd63e.jpg.html)


The electric wagon looks different again with the wheels on it!
The wheels still need to be painted and the metal hubs and brake drums get painted same red as frame.


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030385_zps3fe6aafe.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030385_zps3fe6aafe.jpg.html)


Bell's Studebaker Diner & Museum 2014 Annual Open House had 153 people driving their Studebaker's to Bellingham, so Jerry and Joan were able to be with the electric wagon and explain all the interesting things about it!

It got a lot of attention and had a great time!


http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/BellsMuseumOpenHouse2014119_zps52e7c3ec.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/BellsMuseumOpenHouse2014119_zps52e7c3ec.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/BellsMuseumOpenHouse2014080_zps2067ecca.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/BellsMuseumOpenHouse2014080_zps2067ecca.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030703_zps6dd8e69f.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/P1030703_zps6dd8e69f.jpg.html)

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/BellsMuseumOpenHouse2014081_zps9b63e6d3.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/BellsMuseumOpenHouse2014081_zps9b63e6d3.jpg.html)

It still has things to finish, but it's a great example of what Studebaker did between manufacturing horse drawn vehicles and gasoline vehicles.

Thanks again Jerry!

James

Deaf Mute
10-10-2014, 09:40 AM
James,
I hope you picked up a few apples to munch on while going through Wenatche! I did that (and also dined at Studebaker's in Cashmere) after my visit to your fabulous diner & museum three years ago. That vehicle looks great!

8E45E
10-10-2014, 01:15 PM
James,

Thanks for the progress report! We are really looking forward to seeing your electric wagon when its all completed.

Craig

StudeRich
10-10-2014, 03:00 PM
That is one sweet looking Wagon and one of a kind, beyond rare. :!:

Great Pictures of the entire process of the final assembly and picking the Wagon up at Jerry's. Stephanie is to be congratulated on some really FINE progress photos.

I guess I really missed a lot by getting sick on Sat. and not making it to the Museum and Diner for the open house and Wagon unveiling. But once you get into those ER's you never get out for 4 or 5 hours at least. :(

Glad to see that Dave was able to help between his multiple trips to Los Angeles. :)

57pack
10-10-2014, 06:07 PM
To settle a discussion with friends...
Studebaker had no connection with the Baker Electric Car Co. Of Ohio. Right?
While growing up here in Pitman, there was a little elderly lady who would drive a Baker Electric least once a week well into the 1960's. Always had a 1950 NJ plate on it, police never bothered her.
This how the conversation got started with some childhood buddies.
To all involved in saving and restoring this Studebaker Electric...Job well done!:!!:

Bellingham Studenut
10-10-2014, 10:46 PM
Yes, Baker Electric was a completely different company.

Dwain, we got the first load in the wagon when Joan came out and placed fresh produce in the wagon from their garden to take home.
The picture of the truck was only about a mile away from Cashmere with the river behind the truck and apple orchards in front of it.
Studebaker's Restaurant is no longer there (it got sold to 49er Diner).


We may not be able to bring our electric wagon to St. Louis Meet, but it wouldn't be the only one that's ever been there - :!:

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/STUDEBAKERElectric01ElectricdeliverywagonNews_1909-01-01PowerWagon_zps260ef03e.jpg (http://s356.photobucket.com/user/Studenut_photos/media/Studebaker%20Electric%20Wagon/STUDEBAKERElectric01ElectricdeliverywagonNews_1909-01-01PowerWagon_zps260ef03e.jpg.html)

James

57pack
10-11-2014, 05:28 PM
Thank you James! It's rare I'm right.
Have to say, this post of your Studebaker Electric is among one of the best!
I thank you for sharing with us.:!:

Aussie Hawk
10-11-2014, 06:38 PM
James I have been watching the wagon rebuild with great interest, fantastic job. I look forward to the video of it's first drive. It's a pity Studebaker didn't build steam cars, that would have married my two great loves.

Bellingham Studenut
08-24-2015, 02:51 AM
The Studebaker Electric Paddy Wagon in St. Louis didnít have to be called upon during the Meet, but must have been very useful back in its day.
A St. Louis Bank also had the attached special Studebaker Electric Money Wagon driving around town.

Bellingham Studenut
08-24-2015, 03:01 AM
.
The following link is for an interview with Jerry Gieseke, his wife Joan and the Studebaker Electric Wagon at the Bell's Studebaker Diner & Museum.
He should be very proud of the work heís done on this wagon and it will provide a unique glimpse of Studebaker history for many people to enjoy, for a long long time.

https://vimeo.com/135501235 (https://vimeo.com/135501235)

James

DEEPNHOCK
08-24-2015, 07:01 AM
What a great video!
What a wonderful project!
Kudo's to all!


.
The following link is for an interview with Jerry Gieseke, his wife Joan and the Studebaker Electric Wagon at the Bell's Studebaker Diner & Museum.
He should be very proud of the work heís done on this wagon and it will provide a unique glimpse of Studebaker history for many people to enjoy, for a long long time.

https://vimeo.com/135501235 (https://vimeo.com/135501235)

James

effiedude
05-18-2016, 04:03 PM
5421154212542135421454215 Just thought I'd share My Thomas A. Edison Nickle Cadmium Storage battery for the Studebaker Electric Cars. This One is in amazing working shape and is right down the road From the Bells, in Sedro Woolley, WA. Yes James Bell, I would like to see Your car. I did see that Your original post said Your Electric Wagon is a 1902, Thomas A. Edison didn't have His Storage batteries available to the General public until 1903. FYI.

effiedude
05-18-2016, 04:22 PM
James! I was wondering what type of Battery array are You using in Your Electric Car? Would You be interested in the Original Thomas A. Edison set for Your car? Just thought I'd share My Thomas A. Edison Nickle Cadmium Storage battery for the Studebaker Electric Cars. This One is in amazing working shape and is right down the road From the You54211542135421254216542175421854219 in Sedro Woolley, WA. Yes James Bell, I would like to see Your car. I did see that Your original post said Your Electric Wagon is a 1902, Thomas A. Edison didn't have His Storage batteries available to the General public until 1903. FYI.

StudeRich
05-18-2016, 06:39 PM
Studebaker may have used something like this in their Cars, but James' is a Electric Wagon, and definitely would be used as a Truck.

Interesting, if those Seven Cells were 2 Volts each, you would have 14 Volts!

The Wagon requires 48 Volts.

effiedude
05-18-2016, 08:31 PM
This set of batteries is the spare set that came from an estate that had an early Studebaker electric car, The buyer didn't take them as the original set had Studebaker stenciled on the battery box! but true these came from a buggy type two seater electric Studebaker car.

8E45E
05-18-2016, 08:51 PM
I was wondering what type of Battery array are You using in Your Electric Car? Would You be interested in the Original Thomas A. Edison set for Your car? Just thought I'd share My Thomas A. Edison Nickle Cadmium Storage battery for the Studebaker Electric Cars. This One is in amazing working shape and is right down the road From the You

Is that the older Type 'E', or the much improved Type 'A'?

Craig

Bellingham Studenut
08-07-2017, 11:05 AM
The sprocket on the rear drums were worn enough that the chain would climb out as the wheels spin, so a new ring gear was made.
The front sprockets worked fine, but upon testing found the ratio made the wagon go too fast, so new front sprockets were installed giving it the correct ratio, speed and torque when controlling the throttle.

66100

Bellingham Studenut
08-07-2017, 11:12 AM
The side lamps are still being restored, but mounts where placed were they belong and will add some Edison glow for the evening rides.


6610166102

Bellingham Studenut
08-07-2017, 11:21 AM
The hand controller and all the electrical were installed and tested with everything working correctly.
Power switch has a removable key like original and acts as a forward and reverse power switch.

66103

66104

Bellingham Studenut
08-07-2017, 11:32 AM
The steering parts were missing when we got the wagon, so we had to determine how it worked and what to make.
Jerry being a retired machinist, figured out the right angles and parts to make a Tiller that would swing up out of the way when climbing into the drivers seat.
The parts and brackets were machined and installed with the brass handle.

66105

The lower pitman arm and reach rod was made to work as original.

66106

Bellingham Studenut
08-07-2017, 11:46 AM
The Wheels received numerous coats of sealer, sanding and were painted several times to get a nice smooth finish to do some pin striping.


66107

66108

66109

66110

We were fortunate enough to find an original photo showing this pin stripe pattern to use.

Bellingham Studenut
08-07-2017, 12:06 PM
Jim McClain has been a great help on the wagon since Jerry had moved into a smaller house without a shop.
Jim has a wonderful shop and was even able to get Interstate Batteries to donate the batteries that power the Studebaker Electric Wagon!
Original Edison batteries are not available and the new ones are better design and do a great job being reliable. A solar panel displayed in the back might get lots of attention with a very old Studebaker being powered by free energy (What kind of mileage does a 1902 Studebaker get?).
Jim is a talented guy and knows how to get things done.

66111

66112

52-fan
08-07-2017, 12:47 PM
Fantastic! I was wondering a few weeks ago what had become of this project. I see it has been over a year since the last report.

StudeRich
08-07-2017, 12:54 PM
The sprocket on the rear drums were worn enough that the chain would climb out as the wheels spin, so a new ring gear was made.
The front sprockets worked fine, but upon testing found the ratio made the wagon go too fast, so new front sprockets were installed giving it the correct ratio, speed and torque when controlling the throttle.

66100

Too bad you changed the Ratio to SLOW it down James, you could have raced a New Tesla! :D

Bellingham Studenut
08-07-2017, 12:54 PM
The Bell's Studebaker Diner & Museum is very proud to own the Studebaker Electric Wagon and bring it back to life.
A true test for any vehicle is to test drive it for the first time.

The Northwest Chapter of the Antique Studebaker Club was having it's Zone Meet Tour in Spokane WA. area and was going to the Studebaker Garage in Harrington, WA.
We made arrangements to tuck the wagon inside the garage, hiding it until the tour arrived.
Jerry and I bought matching vintage outfits to drive the wagon out of the Studebaker Garage and suprize everyone as we drive it for the fist time in many many years down the main street. Jerry's wife Joan has been so supportive of Jerry helping with this project and was hemming our vintage pants the night before.
It was only fitting to give Jerry the honor of driving the wagon for the 1st time, since he did the majority of the work on it.

The day of it's unveiling and drive downtown Harrington went without a hitch!
A great time after recycling a very rare piece of history!

66119
L-R Joan & Jerry Gieseke, Jim McClain, James & Stephanie Bell


Watch the Video!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a05hCJr7ei0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a05hCJr7ei0)


We still have some side lettering to let people know it's a Studebaker, the volt/amp gage to add and the side lamps, but seeing it in action was amazing!

Thanks to everyone who had a hand in helping with this unique project.
It will bring a lot of new exposure to Studebaker vehicles and provide lots of enjoyment to those who see it for many years to come.

James

sweetolbob
08-07-2017, 12:55 PM
Fantastic!!!! :D

8E45E
08-07-2017, 02:15 PM
Thanks for the update, James!!

Possibly the EARLIEST self-propelled Studebaker that still survives?

Craig

57pack
08-07-2017, 02:54 PM
Thank you so much for the update and that great video!
Would love to be with you when you get down to the DMV!

BobPalma
08-07-2017, 03:55 PM
:!!: :!!: :!!: Easily the coolest video on the internet today; congratulations all around.

Uh-oh, I just remembered: Where did you find good used or NOS battery hold-downs? :lol:

As Craig Parslow said, is this now the oldest documented, operable, self-propelled Studebaker? :!: ;) :cool: BP

Mark L
08-07-2017, 04:27 PM
Amazing work! You might want to consider getting a slow-moving vehicle triangle to temporarily hang on the back for the times you want to drive it on the public roads.

Washington State did not start to issue license plates until 1905, so it will be interesting to see what the DMV requires to have it registered should you choose to go that route.

lschuc
08-07-2017, 07:06 PM
It would cool to photograph this 1902 Studebaker Electric together with a 2017 Tesla, two electric cars, 117 years apart. That would surely get lots of newspaper and TV publicity for the SDC and your chapter!

studeclunker
08-07-2017, 07:08 PM
Oh dear me, in their shirtsleeves?? These young people, whatever are we to do with them?:eek:

Looks fabulous!:woot: However if that's the best speed it can do, I'll stick with my horses, thanks.https://s.yimg.com/ok/u/assets/img/emoticons/emo3.gif

‚ÄčIt must be immensely satisfying after all this time to take it out for a turn, finally. Thanks so much for sharing the photos, progress reports, and finally video! Do please forgive my levity and silliness too.

studegary
08-07-2017, 08:37 PM
Congratulations on seeing this project through to completion!!

I find it hard to believe that a town exists with nice streets and NO traffic.

Hallabutt
08-08-2017, 04:13 AM
Gary,

Harrington is really a living ghost town, if there is such a thing. One of many towns that sprung up across the West during the later part of the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. This is dryland wheat country, some of the most productive in the world. When it took a good day to travel to Spokane, these small towns grew up around the grain elevators. Beginning during the Depression, because of the economics of the time and because of better modes of transportation, their business districts became less important and many just went away.

Harrington is one of those places whose business districts just died. People still live in Harrington, but there is really no business district at all. You can't even get a hamburger in Harrington, or a cup of coffee for that matter. Several important things set Harrington apart from some of the other communities like it, however. It had a bunch of quality built brick and concrete buildings that really aged well. Then there was an energetic couple that fell in love with the idea of restoring the old hotel. The building needed literally millions of dollars and countless hours of their own time. It still remains to be seen whether the project will ever be completed, but the energy was exciting and remains. But maybe most important from our point of view, was that it was where Allen Barth lived.

Allen just lived his life by playing the game with a different set of rules. Nothing that I could say would due justice to this unique character. He lived his life on a different level then everyone else. He actually envisioned bringing Harrington back to life. He knew that he could never expect to bring back 1920, but he felt that on any given weekend he could make it a destination for old car hobbyists.

Paramount to his vision was the old Ford dealership in the center of town. It was owned by an elderly lady who had it's fifteen thousand square feet of space crammed with stuff. Things that Allen described as junk. It took him years of trying to buy the building, before he finally got her to sell. Then there was the immense amount of time that it took to clean it out, refurbish the building, before anointing it as his Studebaker garage. At the same time he ran his restoration business from his home, which was about ten miles away in the middle of a sea of wheat. Sadly Allen recently lost his battle with cancer, but not before much of what he envisioned had already come to fruition. Allen's dream lives on in his son and daughter. They have vowed to continue with what he started.

Avantidon
08-08-2017, 06:34 AM
What a fantastic restoration. Congratulations to all who worked on the project. Thanks James Bell!

8E45E
08-08-2017, 06:51 AM
Washington State did not start to issue license plates until 1905, so it will be interesting to see what the DMV requires to have it registered should you choose to go that route.

That doesn't make sense.

One is able to register a vehicle regardless of what year it is, just as one can also register a non-US market make/model if its over 25 years old. In 1905, do you think a vehicle would have been 'unregisterable' because it was older?

Craig

Mark L
08-09-2017, 07:32 PM
Sorry, I should have explained myself better. I was thinking in terms of registering it as an antique with a year of make license plate (1902). James and Stephanie would be out of luck, since Washington didn't start issuing plates until 1905. They could certainly get a brand new antique vehicle plate.

8E45E
08-09-2017, 07:39 PM
Sorry, I should have explained myself better. I was thinking in terms of registering it as an antique with a year of make license plate (1902). James and Stephanie would be out of luck, since Washington didn't start issuing plates until 1905. They could certainly get a brand new antique vehicle plate.

I don't believe the State of Washington actually issued plates until the early teens. Up until that time, one made their own, usually house numbers on a piece of leather:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7477/15598586218_6f7cf5bf45_k.jpg

Several other states/provinces also required vehicles being licenced a few years before they started issuing actual numbered plates.

Craig