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rockne10
09-14-2010, 09:36 PM
We are all aware of the giant 1931 model 80 Studebaker Four Season Roadster.
http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com/giant_car.asp

At the end of the article it alludes to a '34 plaster Land Cruiser at the Chicago World's Fair that was large enough to hold a movie theater.

I don't suppose anyone might have access to a picture of said Land Cruiser.

DEEPNHOCK
09-14-2010, 10:08 PM
http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/1934-1935-studebaker-land-cruiser-9.jpg



http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/1934-1935-studebaker-land-cruiser-10.jpg



<snip>
I don't suppose anyone might have access to a picture of said Land Cruiser.
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Gary1953
09-14-2010, 10:10 PM
There are post cards of the giant Land Cruiser.

Studebaker Wheel
09-15-2010, 12:10 AM
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/newsgroup/34landcruiserworldsfaircopy.jpg?t=1284527167

Below the article I authored that appeared in the December 2002 issue of Collectible Automobile. Actually it was a sidebar to a more extensive article on the 1934-35 Land Cruisers

The Big and Small of It

By Richard Quinn

The Chicago World Fair, or more correctly the Century of Progress International Exposition, was held on the city’s beautiful lakefront in 1933-34. Its purpose was to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the city’s incorporation and, more importantly, to provide jobs and recreation for a nation mired in a deepening depression. Planning for the event began in the early 1930’s with Studebaker signing its contract to participate in August 1931. At that early date, no one was sure exactly what form their display would take. Whatever it was, it had to be sensational, since all the major auto companies would be represented and each would be trying their best to outdo the other. Of course, Studebaker could display some very impressive vehicles from the company’s museum. They had the carriage in which Abraham Lincoln rode to Ford’s Theater on the night of his assassination, and another in which the Marques de Lafayette toured the U.S. during his visit in the 1820’s, as well as many other historically significant vehicles.
What the executives finally decided upon, however, had nothing to do with museum vehicles. Instead, they would construct the largest automobile ever built. The idea was hatched as a result of another large Studebaker car, which was built in the late spring of 1930 to commemorate Studebaker’s remarkable records of speed and endurance. The car chosen was a 1931 President Model 80 Four Season Roadster. It was constructed of wood and measured 41 feet long, 13½ feet high, 15 feet wide, and weighed 5½ tons. It was built over a three-month period by 60 craftsmen in Paul Auman’s experimental body department. The car was originally used as a prop for a movie short entitled “Wild Flowers” in which 22 members of the Studebaker Champions orchestra were accommodated in the driving compartment of the car. After the completion of the film, the car was disassembled and moved to a prominent knoll along busy Highway 20, just 7 miles west of South Bend, Indiana. Its tremendous popularity and drawing power lead Studebaker executives to consider something similar for their display at the Century of Progress exposition.
Wanting to publicize its newest and most luxurious model, they decided to erect an immense replica of their new President Land Cruiser. Though this giant car would have a wooden framework, the exterior was actually made of plaster and its completion represented a masterpiece of furring, lathing and plastering. So accurate and authentic was the model, that visitors would scratch at the surface with their fingernails to test the composition.
The giant Land Cruiser, which reposed in the great hall of the Travel and Transport Building, was 80 feet long, 28 feet high, and 30 feet wide. The running boards were 21 feet in length, the windshield wiper three, and the tires 12½ feet. For maximum “eye appeal,” it was painted Canary Yellow, a color that was later made available on production models for an extra $80. Below the running board was a door that lead visitors into an auditorium which could accommodate 80 guests. Films were shown therein which extolled the virtues of the new Studebakers and told, in dramatic fashion, how Studebaker had set over 140 records for speed and endurance.
Of course, a full line of normal-sized Studebakers (some painted in Canary Yellow) were on display in the open foyer in front of the giant car. Directly to the left, large crowds gathered to watch craftsmen, from the National Products Company of Chicago, casting miniature (6¾” long) replicas of the Land Cruiser from molten metal. Each model had the words “Replica of Giant World’s Fair Studebaker” embossed on the deck lid. One could also buy a 7” long Studebaker dual wheeled stake bed truck. The car was available in a variety of colors and the truck in red, both for the princely sum of 25¢! Not long after the colossal car was completed, Studebaker announced their new “Year Ahead” model with the horizontal hood louvers. To keep in tune with the production cars, the giant fair car was modified to reflect the recent changes, as did the miniatures. The vehicles were made of pot metal and had white rubber tires. The detail and finish was quite good for that era and the popularity of the promotion led Studebaker to continue the practice in succeeding years. A 1935 model of the Land Cruiser was also done by the same firm and the deck lid inscription read “Studebaker” or “Studebaker Miracle Ride.” These were offered to dealers for 15¢ each.
This writer has often wondered whether the commissioning of the miniature cars by Studebaker at the fair represented the first actual promotional models. Certainly there had been toy cars and trucks built previous to 1934, but were any of these built to the accurate specifications required by Studebaker, and did any receive corporate sanction? If not, we can chalk up another of many “firsts” for the South Bend independent.
Studebaker reaped a tremendous amount of positive publicity from their participation in the exposition. At its conclusion, the big Land Cruiser was dismantled, but many of the thousands of miniatures have survived and are in the hands of collectors.
Oh, and by the way, the large 1931 Proving Ground President survived until the spring of 1936, when it was purposely set afire upon orders by the company president – but that is a story for another day.

65cruiser
09-15-2010, 08:55 AM
I wanna hear more about this Studebaker they hurled down a "104 foot cliff" that drove away under its own power.

ST2DE5
09-15-2010, 07:35 PM
Wonder how far away they went to find a 104 ft cliff. There is no hills in Indiana.

raprice
09-16-2010, 07:16 PM
Boy, it never ceases to amaze me how, when someone asks a question about a Stude event, someone else comes up with the picture a description of the event. Thanks to Richard Quinn, Studedude, & Deepnhock.
You guys are great.
Rog

Studebaker Wheel
09-16-2010, 07:25 PM
I have the actual 16mm film showing the car being pushed off the cliff multiple times and being driven away. Seeing is believing!

rockne10
09-16-2010, 07:38 PM
Richard,
I don't suppose you ever located a copy of "Wild Flowers"?
I suspect there could be a market for all those old "shorts" in digital format before the celluloid falls apart.

Studebaker Wheel
09-16-2010, 07:50 PM
Richard,
I don't suppose you ever located a copy of "Wild Flowers"?
I suspect there could be a market for all those old "shorts" in digital format before the celluloid falls apart.

Yes, in fact I did locate "Wild Flowers." The owner is in the process of donating it to the Library of Congress and they have agreed to make a copy available for reproduction.

PlainBrownR2
09-16-2010, 07:51 PM
Wonder how far away they went to find a 104 ft cliff. There is no hills in Indiana.
Mr. Quinn outta get a kick out of this then...
Hmm a picture of a fence with the car being tossed off of a steep 104 ft dropoff, and there's no hills in Indiana.

Maybe it's Thornton Quarry just over the IL state line then?
(Those of you that have came down I-80 going to or from South Bend would pass over this very deep hole in the ground a few miles from the IL-IN state line. :rolleyes:)

Studebaker Wheel
09-16-2010, 08:09 PM
Mr. Quinn outta get a kick out of this then...
Hmm a picture of a fence with the car being tossed off of a steep 104 ft dropoff, and there's no hills in Indiana.

Maybe it's Thornton Quarry just over the IL state line then?
(Those of you that have came down I-80 going to or from South Bend would pass over this very deep hole in the ground a few miles from the IL-IN state line. :rolleyes:)

No, I believe the cliff was in lower Michigan. The Thornton quarrry is limestone and would not have provided for the relatively "soft" landing that I note in the film.

PlainBrownR2
09-16-2010, 08:18 PM
It was a bit of a joke :p. No hills in Indiana? Can't find the location of the dropoff? There's a dropoff :p!!
Yep, that's a limestone quarry, and the hard bottom might make for a very stomach turning crunch when it landed. I would think for a soft landing the Indiana Dunes might have also been used, but don't quote me on that :cool:.

Studebaker Wheel
01-29-2014, 07:10 PM
Actually after this thread had died some time ago I did another article for Collectible Automobile on the 1934-35 Studebakers (Oct 2013) and in doing research on that I found that the test took place in Pennsylvania though no specific location was cited.

nels
01-29-2014, 08:48 PM
How many 34 and '35 Landruisers were built? What's the survival rate.

rockne10
01-29-2014, 09:29 PM
Richard,
With the resurrection of this thread it may also be noted, the previously alluded to film, "Wild Flowers" also became available and widely circulated.

8E45E
01-29-2014, 09:37 PM
Richard,
I don't suppose you ever located a copy of "Wild Flowers"?
I suspect there could be a market for all those old "shorts" in digital format before the celluloid falls apart.

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?73277-The-WILDEST-Studebaker-Promotion-EVER!&highlight=burnt

Craig

Jessie J.
01-29-2014, 11:45 PM
'...Land Cruiser, super sport model', I do believe they missed an opportunity.


Yes, I've already looked it up, there were other makes that had used the term 'Super Sport' as early as the 1920's, domestically, a 1922-3 Oldsmobile model designation.

DEEPNHOCK
01-30-2014, 07:51 AM
What surprises me is that the Avanti crowd has never built a giant Avanti.. (to go with their giant ego's:lol::rolleyes::whome:)


(it's a joke people....a joke...;))

clonelark
01-30-2014, 08:36 AM
There is a youtube video of the car being pushed off the cliff, but I cant find it now, I have seen it. I typed in Studebaker commercials, Studebaker cliff, 34 Studebaker. I looked well over an hour but couldn't come up with it.

8E45E
01-30-2014, 08:45 AM
There is a youtube video of the car being pushed off the cliff, but I cant find it now, I have seen it. I typed in Studebaker commercials, Studebaker cliff, 34 Studebaker. I looked well over an hour but couldn't come up with it.

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?68625-Studebaker-Geography-Question-Where-Is-This-Cliff&highlight=1934+cliff

Craig

TXmark
01-30-2014, 09:51 AM
but a good one:eek:
What surprises me is that the Avanti crowd has never built a giant Avanti.. (to go with their giant ego's:lol::rolleyes::whome:)


(it's a joke people....a joke...;))

Son O Lark
01-30-2014, 10:14 AM
Directly to the left, large crowds gathered to watch craftsmen, from the National Products Company of Chicago, casting miniature (6¾” long) replicas of the Land Cruiser from molten metal. Each model had the words “Replica of Giant World’s Fair Studebaker” embossed on the deck lid. One could also buy a 7” long Studebaker dual wheeled stake bed truck. The car was available in a variety of colors and the truck in red, both for the princely sum of 25¢! -----------Are there any of these still around? Update- I just did another search and found a few.

nels
01-30-2014, 07:49 PM
How many 34 and '35 Landruisers were built? What's the survival rate.

Bumping the question.

studefan
01-30-2014, 07:55 PM
Don't know nels, but my parents had a 35 Commander Landcruiser, Body number 66. So, they made at least that many 35 Commanders (if they started at "1").

nels
01-30-2014, 09:18 PM
Don't know nels, but my parents had a 35 Commander Landcruiser, Body number 66. So, they made at least that many 35 Commanders (if they started at "1").

They are good looking. Sure remind me of the Pierce Arrow.

Studebaker Wheel
01-31-2014, 01:12 AM
How many 34 and '35 Landruisers were built? What's the survival rate.

In 1934 the total was 841 units broken down as follows - 407 Dictators, 233 Commanders and 201 Presidents. Keep in mind this was a mid model year introduction (started in Jan but late Spring or early summer before they reached most dealers). Unfortunately we have no production figures by body style for 1935.

Mr. Bill
01-31-2014, 07:22 AM
http://youtu.be/_yJHU01kEp8

Here is a sample of Wild Flowers that is posted on You Tube. I don't believe this is complete but it is all that I see posted at this time.

Mr. Bill
Hamlet, NC

8E45E
01-31-2014, 07:37 AM
They are good looking. Sure remind me of the Pierce Arrow.

That is no coincidence. It has been mentioned many times the Land Cruiser was inspired by the 1933 Silver Arrow.

Craig

nels
01-31-2014, 07:37 PM
Probably a question for Dick but anyone is welcome to answer: Do any of these cars exist in the club? What's their value? They ever change hands?

8E45E
01-31-2014, 07:55 PM
Ford Stoecker has a real nice one: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?52771-1934-35-Skyway-Land-Cruiser&highlight=stoecker

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?68050-One-of-a-kind-Studebaker-located-in-South-Africa-–-1935-President-Land-Cruiser&highlight=stoecker

Craig

nels
01-31-2014, 08:48 PM
Craig, I'm going to have to keep my eyes open a little further during the Stude meets. I'd sure like to take a closer look at these cars.

Studebaker Wheel
02-01-2014, 12:58 AM
Craig, I'm going to have to keep my eyes open a little further during the Stude meets. I'd sure like to take a closer look at these cars.

Yes, Nels you should really start looking at the pre-war Studebakers. They will eventually make you want to rid of all those hot rods! Below a '35 Commander Land Cruiser that was shown at the Intl meet in South Bend in '07. It has been on display in the Studebaker National Museum since that time. I believe it still belongs to Richard Monasky of New Hampshire. I know where most all of the Land Cruisers in the country and world are located. I wrote a feature on them for Collectible Automobile in their December 2002 issue.

31970

nels
02-01-2014, 05:34 PM
Yes, Nels you should really start looking at the pre-war Studebakers. They will eventually make you want to rid of all those hot rods! Below a '35 Commander Land Cruiser that was shown at the Intl meet in South Bend in '07. It has been on display in the Studebaker National Museum since that time. I believe it still belongs to Richard Monasky of New Hampshire. I know where most all of the Land Cruisers in the country and world are located. I wrote a feature on them for Collectible Automobile in their December 2002 issue.

31970

Dick
I don't know about getting rid of all the hot rods but I do like the prewar stuff also. This particular body style is very impressive. I guess they were available in different wheel bases? I almost think the shorter the better but without seeing that comparison, if it was available, it would be hard to say.

kurtruk
02-01-2014, 10:37 PM
DANG. Passed up a pair of these taillight assemblies (sans lenses) at the Turlock swap meet on Saturday. Vendor didn't know what they fit, and I thought they were '35 Studebaker. Looks like I was right. :oops:

JimsLeadCommander
02-02-2014, 09:56 PM
Boy, it never ceases to amaze me how, when someone asks a question about a Stude event, someone else comes up with the picture a description of the event. Thanks to Richard Quinn, Studedude, & Deepnhock.
You guys are great.
Rog
Ditto's from me too! Thank you, Mr. Quinn!!