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View Full Version : No patterns no skills!! let the wood work begin



bridgegaurd
08-05-2010, 01:25 PM
I am starting on my first ever wood replacement in a car, we shall see success or tooth picks galore

http://share.shutterfly.com/share/received/album.sfly?sid=0AbOGzlk3YtGLCEg&startIndex=0&fid=556c0174d04ca2d2

55coupe
08-05-2010, 01:44 PM
You are a brave man . It looks like nothing is left to take a pattern from.

jclary
08-05-2010, 01:51 PM
Wow! Great car and big project. I would love to have a nice pre-war Stude to play with. I would love to have a dry enough place to tackle that kind of project. If I did...I would pester everyone I could find that had any knowledge or skill in doing that kind of restoration. However, I also wouldn't hesitate to use alternative materials where possible as long as they would be covered up and undetected after the finished project.

Was this car really used as a commercial taxi? If so...are you going to keep the taxi theme?

And last...good luck and be thankful you don't live near me...you'd have to run me off!:):):)

65cruiser
08-05-2010, 02:26 PM
JeezOCrimeny! Unless you're looking for a perfect restore, I'd find me an old station wagon with the same size roof and replace it with metal. Then you could cover it with fabric if you wanted. That looks like a nightmare.

BobGlasscock
08-05-2010, 03:05 PM
That is an AWESOME project to take on!! I would love to do something like that. Is the roof a wood skeleton with the fabric as a cover? Doesn't look like it was ALL wood on top. If it was just a skeleton, just take measurements to space the ribs and a perimeter frame. I assume the ribs are bowed, so you might need to build a steam/water bath for the ribs.

I am jealous.

fatboylust
08-05-2010, 03:57 PM
Having owned a few wooden boats, I say there is little as satisfying as wood working where unlike houses nothing has square corners or edges. You will find is more like making furniture so when questions arise ask the boat builders or furniture makers. Best of luck.

Dougie
08-05-2010, 03:58 PM
I've never seen anything quite like that. Although it does look like like it might not be as difficult as it first looks if it's limited to the top of the roof. If there is there more wood in other parts of the body, and that's just the tip of the iceberg you've got a much bigger project.

dpson
08-05-2010, 04:10 PM
I took on a similar project about 25 years ago on a 1928 Studebaker Erskine that was in about the same condition. I ended up signing up for a adult "woodshop " class at the local high/trade school which gave me access to all kinds of wood working tools (planers, band saws, etc.). The instructor was very helpful and provided a great deal of guidance and flexibility with my project. This is something you might want to consider, if available in your area.

I recall being advised at the time to be sure to use white oak for the structural members, not red oak as it has certain chemicals that were not conductive to contact with steel (sheet metal) and to use ash for the top bows. I beleive you will find that there are two large "beams" that run along both sides of the top that will need to be replaced and these are mortised and tenioned into the door and body support posts. These were a royal pain to get apart. You may also find that the sheet metal is nailed to the wood framing in a number of places, which is also a challenge to get apart.

My advice is don't dispair; others have succesfully done this with limited woodworking background. Be sure to keep us posted as to how you progress on this project.

bridgegaurd
08-05-2010, 05:09 PM
Wow! Great car and big project. I would love to have a nice pre-war Stude to play with. I would love to have a dry enough place to tackle that kind of project. If I did...I would pester everyone I could find that had any knowledge or skill in doing that kind of restoration. However, I also wouldn't hesitate to use alternative materials where possible as long as they would be covered up and undetected after the finished project.

Was this car really used as a commercial taxi? If so...are you going to keep the taxi theme?

And last...good luck and be thankful you don't live near me...you'd have to run me off!:):):)

I'm looking at some plastifiber material, as far as i can tell the wood is layered side by side and then finish formed to make the curve. No it wasn't a commercial Taxi, the previous owner bought it from a company that furnished background vehicles for movie, TV and photo op sets. It was used in Young Indiana Jones, i have a picture of that. I'm trying to gather more info on it. I am going to keep it painted as is.

bridgegaurd
08-05-2010, 05:15 PM
That is an AWESOME project to take on!! I would love to do something like that. Is the roof a wood skeleton with the fabric as a cover? Doesn't look like it was ALL wood on top. If it was just a skeleton, just take measurements to space the ribs and a perimeter frame. I assume the ribs are bowed, so you might need to build a steam/water bath for the ribs.

I am jealous. Yes it is a skeleton frame that runs down each side and on both ends with bows across the top (they are pretty good so i have a pattern for them) iT is a four layer top cover with chiken wire, cotton batting, cloth sheeting and finally the top material. The ribs can be saw cut from ash boards or composit material, the rest is going to be challenging.

bridgegaurd
08-05-2010, 05:18 PM
You are a brave man . It looks like nothing is left to take a pattern from. My relatives and friends have a much more criptic description of me, a couple are considering giving me a stay at special location.

jjones
08-05-2010, 07:29 PM
I know I will probably catch some flack for this , but have you thought about using thin-wall, square, steel tubing for much of the structural stuff? I have done a couple of Model A Fords this way and it has worked well. Easy to shape and you can tack weld it to the body. Modern glues take the place of tacks for the top and upholstery. Of course, I understand metal--wood and me don't get along unless it's mesquite for the barbeque.

Da Tinman
08-05-2010, 07:41 PM
Best of luck!

I tried working with wood once, it doesnt weld worth a crap and when you finally get it hot enough to lay a good bead, it bursts into flames.

studeclunker
08-05-2010, 11:24 PM
I've seen antique Carriages which were worse. In those there isn't the luxury of a metal covering to hide your boo-boos. Yeah, it's going to be a bit of work. Another resource you might think of are the carriage enthusiasts. Especially the ones who deal with large towne vehicles and coaches. There are a few around.

I don't know of a one in Arizona, however you might try an internet search on Antique Carriages, restoration and repair. Don't be surprised when most of the people are in Missouri, Ohio, and Pennsylvania though.;) There are, by the way, books out on coach building and antique automobile re-construction techniques.

bridgegaurd
08-05-2010, 11:39 PM
Another resource you might think of are the carriage enthusiasts. Especially the ones who deal with large towne vehicles and coaches. There are a few around.

I don't know of a one in Arizona, however you might try an internet search on Antique Carriages, restoration and repair. Don't be surprised when most of the people are in Missouri, Ohio, and Pennsylvania though.;) There are, by the way, books out on coach building and antique automobile re-construction techniques.
[/QUOTE]I have five books that were recommended, i don't have the kaching to hire it out, but that's a good suggestion there are quite a few carriage restorers around southern, AZ. (we have the largest horse drawn rodeo parade in the U.S. every year). Right now I'm measuring, numbering, and making a drawing and of course researching the how too. Now that i think i'm retired i have a lot of time.

barnlark
08-05-2010, 11:40 PM
Phillip, I sure wished you lived near here. There is a specialty automobile shop who employs a couple very talented Amish men whom I have seen build an entire body frame and body with mortise and tenon beauty within weeks. They have racks of those bows made up for some old Rolls Royce and Bentley projects. I just cut down two ash trees, too! Good luck, I hope it comes out looking the way you want without pain.

bridgegaurd
08-05-2010, 11:44 PM
I know I will probably catch some flack for this , but have you thought about using thin-wall, square, steel tubing for much of the structural stuff? I have done a couple of Model A Fords this way and it has worked well. Easy to shape and you can tack weld it to the body. Modern glues take the place of tacks for the top and upholstery. Of course, I understand metal--wood and me don't get along unless it's mesquite for the barbeque. Actualy Jeff this has been suggested by some of the ASDC folks, in fact one even suggested doing a way with the wood and cloth altogether and do a filler using a wagon roof from a brand x. I've even considered a fiberglass cap.

But i'm going to do my usual and try to do it the way i don't know how.

Bob Andrews
08-06-2010, 05:06 AM
I understand metal--wood and me don't get along

That's me exactly. I'm from the 'cut it three times and it's still too short' school of woodworking. Frustrating:mad:

We have many Amish here. Good folks, although they stand out like a sore thumb in modern society. There is a family that actually buys totaled cars and rebuilds them for resale- even though they don't drive or own them for themselves. No job is too big for them to handle, and their work is impeccable!

Consulting Amish on this is a good idea. Maybe I'll come across a car like this, and if I do the first step will be to see if I can find some to work on it. Nice change from the gazebos, furniture, and picnic tables they're usually selling...

Good luck Phil, and do keep us posted!

Nitram
08-06-2010, 06:31 AM
Best of luck!

I tried working with wood once, it doesnt weld worth a crap and when you finally get it hot enough to lay a good bead, it bursts into flames.

LOL, love the humor!

clonelark
08-06-2010, 06:52 AM
I had a 1934 Chevrolet 3/w coupe i built as a street rod in 1973, the door post on the drivers side was water damaged, I found a woodshop teacher that would tackle the project on the side. He done a teriffic job on it, and wnen i painted the car i used Urethane paint to paint the car, I also painted the wood to protect it from water. Got a top from Julineo's and it looked great. Even bracket raced the car some Here is the only pic i have of the car, sold it about 10 years ago.
http://i38.tinypic.com/2ibnn1z.jpg

stude53
08-06-2010, 07:34 AM
The possibility of using the talents of a high school shop teacher is a good idea. Once when I had a "skunk-works" project to do for my employer (NCR) I went to the local high school and enlisted the help of the shop teacher and his class to build a dozen prototypes. They did a super job and the income (donation) they received from me paid for more equipment for their shop.

TDITS
08-06-2010, 08:10 AM
Woodworking is another one of my hobbies. I was going to post a picture of a blanket chest I built for my wife, but can't figure out how to upload it from my pc to a post.
Anyway, wish you were closer to Missouri as it looks like a great project. Good luck, you have gotten some good advice. You might look for some woodworking clubs in your area, you might find someone that would be willing to help you out with either advice, tools, or wood. I think it has already been covered, but stay away from red oak. White oak would be ok. Ash or maple would be better.

4961Studebaker
08-06-2010, 08:18 AM
I recall a Rod and Custom magazine issue that this company made wood kits for the 32 ford sedan delivery, While not a Studebaker surely they could be one additional resource in your quest to repair the Taxi.

Dan Kemppainen at Kemp's Rod & Restoration in Hancock, Michigan,
http://www.rodandcustommagazine.com/techarticles/0906rc_1932_ford_sedan_delivery/photo_02.html
http://www.rodandcustommagazine.com/techarticles/0906rc_1932_ford_sedan_delivery/index.html
http://www.rodandcustommagazine.com/featuredvehicles/0807rc_1932_ford_sedan_delivery/photo_55.html
Good luck,
There's also the option of a metal filled roof covered in convertible material......to give the stock appearance.
However I notice from your pictures that the (eyebrow or sun shade is covered by the same roof piece?) so the above
idea may not work in your application.

studerex
08-06-2010, 12:13 PM
Is this the Taxi that was on the ASC Review cover a few years back? I sure did like to girl posed it the photo. You shoild do the top like original. It's not that hard. http://studebakerclassics.com/wood.html

bridgegaurd
08-06-2010, 02:18 PM
Is this the Taxi that was on the ASC Review cover a few years back? I sure did like to girl posed it the photo. You shoild do the top like original. It's not that hard. http://studebakerclassics.com/wood.html
Could be it's previous owner i'm told belonged to the California ASC. But i don't belong to the ASC so i have never seen the Review. But would sure like to see a copy of that item.

Now someone is going to tell me join the ASC. I've contemplated that but here's my scrath about that subject. I joined the SDC, and both Arizona chapters, so i don't quite get it that i now have to join the ASC and the Arizona ASC chapter and do my post on AACA. One would think the SDC would be sufficient. I'm not getting the reasoning behind this fractured Studebaker society, just like i don't get the separate Avanti thing. Pretty soon i'll be paying more dues than i have money to put in the car. HMMM SDC means?????

Okay i've had my rant, i have an ASC app on my desk some day i guess I'll have to itch the scratch.