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Gallivan
07-29-2006, 09:48 AM
Thanks for all the advise and encouragement! I just checked the compression and all cylinders are between 65 and 70, so I'm thinking I might not have to do a complete rebuild. I've read some of the suggestions here, like replacings seals, including valve seals, pull out all plugs, including freeze plugs, and some of my wiring insulation is pretty brittle. My question is: what else should I do
while the engine is still hooked up?[?]

One other question. I found Frank's website on the 56 GH and he has a great resource for original colors.
http://www.1956goldenhawk.com/56ghauth.pdf
Can anyone spot any differences that I should change for my 57?
By the way, the whole top half of my engine except valve covers, is painted gold- is that correct? I don't see any traces of turquoise or any other color underneath the gold.
Thanks in advance.
Gallivan

Golden (hey what a coincidence!) Colorado
57 Golden Hawk

Gallivan
07-29-2006, 10:30 AM
I was just reviewing Frank's page, and there's a lot of information, so I'll simplify my second question.

Everything in my wheelwells is covered in a combination of undercoating and caked on mud. I'm thinking the last owner/driver lived on a dirt road. I will be removing all the crap and would like to know what color suspension parts and frame should be painted, and suggestions for coating the inside of the fenders.

As I said in my last post, the heads, intake manifold, etc are gold- I can't tell what color the block used to be.

Gallivan


Golden, CO
57 Golden Hawk

Roscomacaw
07-29-2006, 01:34 PM
The engine block should be Turquoise. The frame and suspension parts are all a semi-gloss black.:)

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

Dick Steinkamp
07-29-2006, 01:44 PM
quote:Originally posted by Gallivan

I just checked the compression and all cylinders are between 65 and 70, so I'm thinking I might not have to do a complete rebuild.


If it is actually 65-70 pounds across all cylinders, that motor is toast. How did you do the check?




http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

studegary
07-29-2006, 02:53 PM
quote:Originally posted by Gallivan

Thanks for all the advise and encouragement! I just checked the compression and all cylinders are between 65 and 70, so I'm thinking I might not have to do a complete rebuild.
57 Golden Hawk


If you did the compression test properly and with a known good gauge, that engine sounds like it is in bad shape. I question these assumptions because of the close spread of readings that you state. A really worn or defective engine wouldn't normally have readings grouped that close together.

Did you do the readings with a known good and accurate gauge? Did you do the readings with all the plugs out and the throttle and choke wide open? Did you spin the engine over fast for a couple of revolutions to reach the peak reading? How much did the readings increase with a wet (with a little oil in each cylinder) reading?

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY
1954 Commander Starliner (restomod)
1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)

Gallivan
07-29-2006, 03:00 PM
I just did one cylinder at a time, not with all the plugs out, and didn't sqirt oil in. I couldn't remember what good compression reading was supposed to be, but I knew it was good if all cylinders were similar.:(

I will test the gauge on my truck- if it says 70lbs. I will buy a new gauge. I will try your other suggestions as well.

Thanks! Say Mr. Biggs, is gold correct for the manifold, valley tray,etc ?

Gallivan

Roscomacaw
07-29-2006, 03:29 PM
"Say Mr. Biggs, is gold correct for the manifold, valley tray,etc ?"

No, those items should be the same color as the block - Turquoise. Valve covers were black as well as oil pan, generator, fan, starter, oil filter cannister.
Late production cars had a metallic silver-gray (instead of turquoise) with all the aformentiond black pieces still black.



Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

Gallivan
07-31-2006, 09:31 PM
If anyone is still following this thread, I re-did the compression test with all the plugs out- it DOES make a difference!

Here are the readings, dry/wet:

#1 110/114 #2 110/120 #3 110/110 #7 115/120

#2 118/120 #4 112/120 #6 112/125 #8 125/135

What do you think? Ring/valve job in order?


Gallivan
57 Golden Hawk

stude freak
07-31-2006, 09:37 PM
IMHO i would drive it a while n see if the rings reseat and level out.If not or if it smokes alot then rering it.

David Baggett Mantachie,Ms.

studegary
08-01-2006, 01:27 PM
This looks much better. Did you have the choke and throttle plates proped fully open while doing the test? Did you crank it a few revolutions for each reading (to get peak reading)?

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY
1954 Commander Starliner (restomod)
1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)

Gallivan
08-01-2006, 06:44 PM
I didn't prop the throttle open, because I don't haver a fuel supply connected yet (waiting for my gas tank sealer to arrive). Would that have made any difference in my readings?

I did crank it 4x to get peak readings.

I have to ask one more beginner question- I haven't really done any thing with the electric yet, but I would like to test the fuel sender while I have the tank out. I tried moving the float with the sending wire hooked up and a connection between the sender body and ground, but the guage didn't budge at all. I do have an auto multitester (30 years old) and a household multitester, but don't know much about ohms/resistance. Can someone tell how to do a bench test with one of my multitesters?

Thanks

Gallivan
57 Golden Hawk

studegary
08-01-2006, 07:48 PM
quote:Originally posted by Gallivan

I didn't prop the throttle open, because I don't haver a fuel supply connected yet (waiting for my gas tank sealer to arrive). Would that have made any difference in my readings?




Proping the throttle and choke open has nothing to do with fuel supply. In fact, it is strongly desirable not to have fuel being pumped into the engine when you are doing the compression check. As I stated previously, the throttle and choke plates should be proped fully open when doing a compression check. This is to allow the maximum amount of air to be ingested into the engine upon cranking. Your readings should increse some more with adequate air entering the engine.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY
1954 Commander Starliner (restomod)
1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)

Gallivan
08-01-2006, 08:01 PM
Thanks, Gary.
I read in one of the old posts something about propping the butterfly for fuel-related reasons.

I'll try again. I'm getting better at getting my guage in the #7 plug hole, right in front of the power steering hose.

Gallivan