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ddub
03-27-2006, 03:37 PM
Thanks for all the good input on who invented the Hill Holder. Now for my next question, why is the key lock on my 64 Champ on the passenger side?

To lock the thing I must lock the driver door, slide across and exit the passenger door and use the key to lock it. Reverse the proceedure to enter. None of that lock the door and hold the button when you close it, no, use the key...ON THE PASSENGER SIDE. I often leave it unlocked.

Was this a cost saver? Even so why on the passenger side? I seem to recall reading that a driver side key lock was an option. Was this a safety thing so I won't stand in the street to lock the door? Were Larks like this also? Is there some reason that this makes sense that I just don't understand?

53 Commander Hardtop
64 Champ 1/2 ton
WA state

studegary
03-27-2006, 03:49 PM
Years ago, it was the law that you had to enter and exit your vehicle from the curb side. Also, before (most) all roads were paved, it was a lot cleaner to enter and exit from the curb side. Of course, bucket seats and consoles made this next to impossible. I am not saying that I am in agreement, just some of the background behind it.

I do not recall the first vehicle that I had that I could lock without a key, but I am sure that it was a much later model than a 1953 that those doors/lock mechanisms are based on.

raprice
03-27-2006, 04:45 PM
Gary's response triggered a memory. When I took my driver's test in Mineola, NY in 1955, I had to enter the car from the curb side of the car followed by the inspector. My drivers' education teacher in my high school insisted that we had to do it that way. Of course, virtually all cars at that time came with full bench seats. I don't know exactly when the rule changed, but it had to change due to the increase in cars built with bucket seats.
I also remember back then that the drivers' ed cars were always supplied by a local dealer and the teacher was paid by the school district.
Rog

rockne10
03-27-2006, 07:45 PM
You'll note also on the four door sedans, you can push the button on the back doors and close them locked but not the front doors; makes it nearly intentional to lock your car with the key in the ignition.

Transtar60
03-27-2006, 08:05 PM
quote:Originally posted by ddub

Thanks for all the good input on who invented the Hill Holder. Now for my next question, why is the key lock on my 64 Champ on the passenger side?

To lock the thing I must lock the driver door, slide across and exit the passenger door and use the key to lock it. Reverse the proceedure to enter. None of that lock the door and hold the button when you close it, no, use the key...ON THE PASSENGER SIDE. I often leave it unlocked.

Was this a cost saver? Even so why on the passenger side? I seem to recall reading that a driver side key lock was an option. Was this a safety thing so I won't stand in the street to lock the door? Were Larks like this also? Is there some reason that this makes sense that I just don't understand?

53 Commander Hardtop
64 Champ 1/2 ton
WA state
The drivers side door lock was available on U.S. Trucks as an option.