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doctormap
11-30-2005, 11:47 AM
I have just about gotten my '48 Champion down to the bare body. The original rustproofing stuff is in good shape, except in the front floor pan, where it is rusted off under the passenger's feet, and some is coming off under the driver's feet. Should I remove the rest? I can see already that this would be a big job. I have read elsewhere about other restorers who have removed it with heat and kerosene and lots of elbow grease. Others have had the body "dipped" to remove it, but that also removes all the paint. I plan to replace it with more modern sound and rust-proofing materials.
Soooo- the question is, should I remove it all, or just leave it where it is in good shape, removing only the part that is coming loose? Any idea how much it costs to have the body "dipped?"
http://www.geocities.com/mark.pearson22@sbcglobal.net/P1010044a.JPG

doctormap
'48 Champion 4-door

Alan
11-30-2005, 01:10 PM
Be ready to have your wallet diped too. Took the hood of my 53K over to Ready Strip in Santa Fe Springs to have it dipped because it is hard to get all the trash inside the hood clean because of the braces. $300 just for the hood.

studegary
11-30-2005, 02:59 PM
What you are referring to is the factory undercoating. It was more of a sound deadener than a rustproofing. It was never considered rustproofing and, in fact, it served as more of a rust promoter when it lost adhesion. I would remove at least any that appears to have come loose from the metal.

N8N
11-30-2005, 03:32 PM
I agree 100% with Gary. I would definitely remove as much as I can. In fact, next time you wash the underside of the car, just look at how that factory undercoat sucks in the moisture wherever it's cracked. I would definitely try to peel it off, repaint the metal, then apply new undercoat over the paint. Just MHO, of course...

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
62 Daytona hardtop
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

N8N
11-30-2005, 03:34 PM
Oh, yeah, if you can find a stiff plastic scraper, you might be surprised just how much you can get off easily once you find an "edge" to get you started. On the underside of my '55 coupe, the factory paint is still good on the underside of the floor, but every time I'm under the car, I rip off a few more big chunks of undercoat. Eventually once I run out of mechanical things to fix I will really tackle cleaning it up underneath :)

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
62 Daytona hardtop
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

DilloCrafter
11-30-2005, 04:09 PM
I asked myself these same questions about my 55 truck (which, by the way, spent its first 50 yrs in California and had less rust than you would expect most anywhere else). I peeled off some of that undercoating from the back wall of the truck cab, and found surface rust on the painted metal underneath. Same for the floorboard in the areas where water tended to sit.

I tried heating and scraping with a plastic scraper, but it left a messy residue. Ultimately I found the best thing was a very sharp 3/4" woodworking chisel, with the edges just slightly rounded (this occurs naturally if you use the chisel enough). Although this took a lot of elbow grease, it totally removed the undercoating, and I had lots of pulverized undercoating to vacuum up. Every time the work got slow and tiring, I would go and resharpen that chisel, and get back to it. To me, this seems to be the only way to really remove the stuff.

Then, of course, you spray the whole area with POR-15's Marine Clean water based degreaser, and follow that with their Metal Ready (or the Jasco phosphoric acid metal prep stuff from Lowe's, which is the same thing). Finally, paint with any color POR-15 rust treatment coating, and you are ready to put in some modern sound deadening material.

I plan to use strips of Dynamat, followed by a layer of an aluminized padding (maybe AcoustiSHIELD from www.quietride.com, unless I find a cheaper alternative that is as good. I am open to suggestions, if anyone wants to chime in.

1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/current_AvaCar.gif

jimmijim8
12-01-2005, 05:17 AM
Like what was said earlier, a wood chisel works fine. Use a heat gun or Bernz-o-matic propane torch to soften the stuff. Heat an area around 6" square or so and keep advancing the heat as you scrape. Takes a while but you will get real good at it. You will get quicker as you go along. If you are laying on the underside of the car make sure you have safety glasses on. Gloves work good to. jimmijim

Kdancy
12-01-2005, 06:02 AM
Agree with Jimmijim and others, get as much off as you can. I have taken some off a 53-- underneath the undercoating was a coating of rust in some areas.
Also for some that may want to try something different than Por15, here is a product that I really like, I tried it after using the por and having some bonding issues with it even using their cleaner and a pressuer washer on the vehicle---
http://www.nomorerust.com/silver.html

DilloCrafter
12-01-2005, 11:03 AM
Kdancy, thanks for that link to an alternative to POR15. I'm even more interested in the ceramic coating they sell for headers and exhaust manifolds. They say you can brush or spray it on as a do-it-yourself job, and that would save me nearly $200 compared to having a company do the ceramic coating for me.

Here's their link to this High Heat ceramic coating product: http://www.nomorerust.com/highheat/

1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/current_AvaCar.gif

Buddy1944
12-01-2005, 12:50 PM
I bought an air chissel from Harbor Freight for $13 and with 60 PSI it does a great job removing dry undercoating, also works well on uneven surfaces

Buddy...'54 Champion 2dr

Commander51
12-01-2005, 03:12 PM
I agree with Buddy1944... I used an air chisel on my 51 Commander and it came off quickly with minimal dust. Just dial down the pressure and take your time. I recoated with POR and got good adhesion.

doctormap
12-02-2005, 01:31 PM
Actually, I was secretly hoping that no one would encourage me to take it off (knowing deep down that it was going to have to come off anyway). Thanks so much for the helpful ideas. Actually, the coating I was looking at was inside the car on the floors, but I know that the same stuff is on the underside, too.

I got a new Sears air compressor a few weeks ago, and it came with a set of tools, including an air chisel. That sounds a lot easier than using a hand-held wood chisel! I plan to coat the bare metal with POR-15, but I am open to any reasonable money-saving alternatives!

doctormap
'48 Champion 4-door