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Chucks Stude
03-11-2007, 12:06 PM
Having not had a Studebaker in some 25 years, it is like stepping back into the past. It is a past that I think some owners do not really want to participate in. They think their Studes look good, and that is all that needs to happen. I know that a new car has O grease fittings. Does that mean something built 40+ years ago, is of the same technology? I know you only change the struts(shocks)on a new car when the thing throws you in the ditch. If one were to peruse the owners manual of a Studebaker, they would find a bunch of items that need to be addressed every thousand miles. I know that some new cars only are getting their second, or third tank of gas at a thousand miles, and are going to go 10,000 miles, either intentionally, or unintentionally on an oil change.
So, the question is: Why do some people try to imprint new values on something built that long ago?
Both of my parents recently passed away. Some of the younger kids mused that they were not "with it". They lived thru the depression, WW11,and a list of other things that would change one's perspecive. Yet, here they were, being judged by standards of today.
Same with an old car. One must get their arms around the technology of the day, and not today.
I have been looking to buy king pin rebuilding kits, for my GT, because it handled so badly. I thought that just as long as I was replacing the shocks, I might as well grease the car, even though some of the fitting shown that they had been done recently.
It took 4 hours to grease the car, because most of the grease fittings had not seen grease in decades, not years. I had to take a lot of them apart, clean them out and replace the zerk.
As I replaced the shocks, the threads on the nuts remained with the bolts, they had been there so long. One of the shocks still had the tag on it. It did not match the one on the other side of the back. It was a Delco "Pleasurizer". I personally have never heard of one of those. Beside being kinda politically incorrect by todays standards, it was frozen. It was not AC Delco, just Delco.
Needless to say, the car handles much better, and doesn't need king pins. Just someone who cares. The car drives better, and I feel better after this rant. It is just frustrating to see something left in this condition when it takes so little to maintain, and so much to fix when it has been ignored.

Swifster
03-11-2007, 05:11 PM
The easy answer is that they don't know better and that new equals greatly improved. I've dabbled with old cars for a long time now and I'm aware of the far shorter service requirement times. With a standard point ignition system, most service manuals suggested tune ups in the 10,000 mile to 15,000 mile range. No, you won't get 100,000 miles before the next one. And then there's setting the points, replacing the condenser and cap & rotor.

Studebaker suggested oil changes every 4000 miles and Chrysler advised every 7500 miles. And this was with the oils used at the time. The 3000 mile oil change was a oil company gimmick to sell more oil. Even today, many car owners manuals suggest oil changes in excess of the 3000 mile 'standard'.

But in the day, tires lasted 20,000 miles if you were lucky and brakes around 15,000 miles. This was why there was a gas station/garage on every corner. Try finding a 'technician' at the local quicky mart/gas station. Remember, and this is coming from someone who graduated high school in 1982, most people under 35 have never even been to a full service gas station.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/1965_Studebaker_Commander_front198x.jpg

Swifster
03-11-2007, 05:11 PM
The easy answer is that they don't know better and that new equals greatly improved. I've dabbled with old cars for a long time now and I'm aware of the far shorter service requirement times. With a standard point ignition system, most service manuals suggested tune ups in the 10,000 mile to 15,000 mile range. No, you won't get 100,000 miles before the next one. And then there's setting the points, replacing the condenser and cap & rotor.

Studebaker suggested oil changes every 4000 miles and Chrysler advised every 7500 miles. And this was with the oils used at the time. The 3000 mile oil change was a oil company gimmick to sell more oil. Even today, many car owners manuals suggest oil changes in excess of the 3000 mile 'standard'.

But in the day, tires lasted 20,000 miles if you were lucky and brakes around 15,000 miles. This was why there was a gas station/garage on every corner. Try finding a 'technician' at the local quicky mart/gas station. Remember, and this is coming from someone who graduated high school in 1982, most people under 35 have never even been to a full service gas station.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/1965_Studebaker_Commander_front198x.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
03-11-2007, 06:13 PM
I agree with Tom. I don't think most of those PO's were being mean spirited...they just weren't familiar with the maintenance of 1960's cars.

I wonder how many of us would know all the ins and outs of maintaining and keeping a '23 Studebaker running (for example)?



http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
03-11-2007, 06:13 PM
I agree with Tom. I don't think most of those PO's were being mean spirited...they just weren't familiar with the maintenance of 1960's cars.

I wonder how many of us would know all the ins and outs of maintaining and keeping a '23 Studebaker running (for example)?



http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

MagikDraggin
03-11-2007, 06:21 PM
My very first 'ride' was a '49 Studebaker "Commander", if my memory serves me correctly. That was back in the mid 1950's....the "dark ages" to some, I am sure.

Since then, I have run the gamet of cars, from 6 cyl Fords, to dual quad ram inducted Mopars, to rat-motor Chevies, to the fire-breathing 440 horsepower monster in the garage next to my latest acquisition, a '62 Studebaker GT Hawk.

I have now come full circle in the business of owning cars. Yes, the shiney Torch Red Corvette sitting next to the shiny black Stude is definitely a technological marvel, there's no doubt about that. It almost runs itself.

With a slight upgrade to the onboard computer, I have no doubts that me and the car could actually conduct a reasonably intelligent conversation while eating up the miles on the highway, getting 30 mpg while doing 75 mph.

But in spite of all that technology, I "thirsted" for some of that so-called "old technology", where the car depended on me as much as I depended on it for continued survival.

I can certainly sympathize with the poster who feels a particular affinity with these "old school" automobiles. And in spite of all their technological shortcomings, I am more at ease with my Stude than I am with that Corvette.

Why?......well if for no other reason, if something were to happen and I'd find myself broke down along side the highway, there is a good chance I can probably fix the Stude and get her going long enough to reach the next populated area, while with the superior and highly advanced Vette, I'd just throw my hands up in frustration and disgust and call for a tow-truck to come and get me and my sorry technological miracle car.

Greasing a few zerks on frequent occasions, changing the oil more often, making sure there is always a sufficient amount of lining left on the brake shoes, gapping the spark plugs and distributor points.....all part of the "love affair" a person develops with his automobile.

I missed that. It's why I came back. And why there's now an old Sudebaker in my garage after a 50 year absense. Life once again has taken on a new "sense of meaning". I don't "imprint" todays values on the old car.....on the contrary, I welcome the old values back again. It was from a time when things were not necessarily any 'simpler', but it was a lot more 'fun'.

Some people just don't know what they're missing by not getting an old car and recapturing a piece of their past.....in a way, yes you can "go back". I did.[8D]

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v147/MagikDraggin/Other%20Stuff/62StudebakerGTHawk1-small.jpg
1962 GT Hawk 4sp

MagikDraggin
03-11-2007, 06:21 PM
My very first 'ride' was a '49 Studebaker "Commander", if my memory serves me correctly. That was back in the mid 1950's....the "dark ages" to some, I am sure.

Since then, I have run the gamet of cars, from 6 cyl Fords, to dual quad ram inducted Mopars, to rat-motor Chevies, to the fire-breathing 440 horsepower monster in the garage next to my latest acquisition, a '62 Studebaker GT Hawk.

I have now come full circle in the business of owning cars. Yes, the shiney Torch Red Corvette sitting next to the shiny black Stude is definitely a technological marvel, there's no doubt about that. It almost runs itself.

With a slight upgrade to the onboard computer, I have no doubts that me and the car could actually conduct a reasonably intelligent conversation while eating up the miles on the highway, getting 30 mpg while doing 75 mph.

But in spite of all that technology, I "thirsted" for some of that so-called "old technology", where the car depended on me as much as I depended on it for continued survival.

I can certainly sympathize with the poster who feels a particular affinity with these "old school" automobiles. And in spite of all their technological shortcomings, I am more at ease with my Stude than I am with that Corvette.

Why?......well if for no other reason, if something were to happen and I'd find myself broke down along side the highway, there is a good chance I can probably fix the Stude and get her going long enough to reach the next populated area, while with the superior and highly advanced Vette, I'd just throw my hands up in frustration and disgust and call for a tow-truck to come and get me and my sorry technological miracle car.

Greasing a few zerks on frequent occasions, changing the oil more often, making sure there is always a sufficient amount of lining left on the brake shoes, gapping the spark plugs and distributor points.....all part of the "love affair" a person develops with his automobile.

I missed that. It's why I came back. And why there's now an old Sudebaker in my garage after a 50 year absense. Life once again has taken on a new "sense of meaning". I don't "imprint" todays values on the old car.....on the contrary, I welcome the old values back again. It was from a time when things were not necessarily any 'simpler', but it was a lot more 'fun'.

Some people just don't know what they're missing by not getting an old car and recapturing a piece of their past.....in a way, yes you can "go back". I did.[8D]

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v147/MagikDraggin/Other%20Stuff/62StudebakerGTHawk1-small.jpg
1962 GT Hawk 4sp

Blue 15G
03-11-2007, 06:22 PM
And in some cases the car was just being used as a second or third car, the people were cheap, and they figured it didn't matter; all the car had to do was run long enough until they could afford to buy something else. Sadly enough, many people just didn't maintain their cars as they should have been, even back in the days when more frequent maintenance was required.

Blue 15G
03-11-2007, 06:22 PM
And in some cases the car was just being used as a second or third car, the people were cheap, and they figured it didn't matter; all the car had to do was run long enough until they could afford to buy something else. Sadly enough, many people just didn't maintain their cars as they should have been, even back in the days when more frequent maintenance was required.

curt
03-11-2007, 06:25 PM
Pleasurizers were in use in 1968, because my father had new shocks placed on his Buick in 1968, they were pleasurizers. As I recall they were gas filled and not oil fill shocks.

curt
03-11-2007, 06:25 PM
Pleasurizers were in use in 1968, because my father had new shocks placed on his Buick in 1968, they were pleasurizers. As I recall they were gas filled and not oil fill shocks.

dictator27
03-11-2007, 06:28 PM
How about a 500 mile oil change interval(with filter)? And greasing once a month. Some items were done once a week. My 27 dictator.:D


Terry

dictator27
03-11-2007, 06:28 PM
How about a 500 mile oil change interval(with filter)? And greasing once a month. Some items were done once a week. My 27 dictator.:D


Terry

Swifster
03-11-2007, 06:40 PM
quote:Originally posted by dictator27

How about a 500 mile oil change interval(with filter)? And greasing once a month. Some items were done once a week. My 27 dictator.:D


Terry


Terry, I'm sure you don't drive this car every day and the oil change frequency probably doesn't seem often enough, eh?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/1965_Studebaker_Commander_front198x.jpg

Swifster
03-11-2007, 06:40 PM
quote:Originally posted by dictator27

How about a 500 mile oil change interval(with filter)? And greasing once a month. Some items were done once a week. My 27 dictator.:D


Terry


Terry, I'm sure you don't drive this car every day and the oil change frequency probably doesn't seem often enough, eh?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/1965_Studebaker_Commander_front198x.jpg

Mark57
03-11-2007, 06:51 PM
Hmmm, I change the oil every 5K (3000 mi on my brand X's, although once I get my 50's Stude, :) it'll probably be every 3 months as I doubt I will be putting that many miles on it... I only put about 10,000/yr on the Ford (and I'll have to buy a grease gun!![:0]

Mark57
03-11-2007, 06:51 PM
Hmmm, I change the oil every 5K (3000 mi on my brand X's, although once I get my 50's Stude, :) it'll probably be every 3 months as I doubt I will be putting that many miles on it... I only put about 10,000/yr on the Ford (and I'll have to buy a grease gun!![:0]

kromer891
03-11-2007, 07:17 PM
This is an interesting topic and it has me thinking about the idea of the modern 'disposable' car. While I'm on the younger side of most people on this site, even I have seen a great difference in the way in which automobiles are designed, produced, and maintained in my soon-to-be thirty years. There's no doubt that these changes have altered most people's perceptions of cars in a relatively short time span.

For example, as I was growing up, my family only ever invested one brand new vehicle: an '86 Chevy full-size van. That van literally seen as an investment and lived through several transmissions, rebuilt rear ends, and as my memory serves me, a couple of engine rebuilds. Somewhere around 180,000 miles, the van finally succumbed to typical Pennsylvania rust (late '90s), was parted out as much as possible and was eventually trailered away to the recycler. All of the other family vehicles were similar in that the maintenance was done in our own shop, they were kept running as long as possible, and they were only replaced when it became absolutely necessary because it was costing more money to keep them on the road than to reasonably replace them.

In comes the concept of leasing. My family never bought into the idea of leasing a new vehicle because they perceived it as no more than renting a car. "What do you have to show for all those payments once your lease is up?" But there's no doubt that the auto manufactures created leasing options to accommodate a perceivable change in the way American consumers wanted to buy cars. (does anybody out there know the timeframe of the first leasing options?)

Somewhere around the same time that Chevy van met its demise, I recall seeing an article of the World Evening News. Dan Rather announced in the background as footage from one of the major autoshows rolled debuting the (then) new Ford Contour. It was marketed with a '100,000 mile engine' that needed no real maintenance before one-hundred-thousand miles. I was awe-struck. Not in wonder and amazement, but I felt that this concept would change the world of the automobile. Well, in the greater scheme of things, the Ford Contour really never made more than a small ripple in the bucket, but I think the mentality has stuck around.

A car that's more than 5 years old now is practically driven into the dirt. At this point, the majority of '02 cars look as if they're on their last leg and it's almost guaranteed that the owner has sucked most of the value right out of it. Granted, I'm in a different financial situation than my parents were in my youth, but it would be very difficult for me to ever consider buying a used car and my warped common sense will likely continue to prevent me keeping a car for more than three or four years.

I know I'm kind of rambling here, but it all has me wondering. Has the American car-buying public changed our impression of cars and car ownership because of change in our values and perceptions in general, or have the car manufacturers changed how they design and market cars to fit our shifting consumerism?

What do you think?

kromer891
03-11-2007, 07:17 PM
This is an interesting topic and it has me thinking about the idea of the modern 'disposable' car. While I'm on the younger side of most people on this site, even I have seen a great difference in the way in which automobiles are designed, produced, and maintained in my soon-to-be thirty years. There's no doubt that these changes have altered most people's perceptions of cars in a relatively short time span.

For example, as I was growing up, my family only ever invested one brand new vehicle: an '86 Chevy full-size van. That van literally seen as an investment and lived through several transmissions, rebuilt rear ends, and as my memory serves me, a couple of engine rebuilds. Somewhere around 180,000 miles, the van finally succumbed to typical Pennsylvania rust (late '90s), was parted out as much as possible and was eventually trailered away to the recycler. All of the other family vehicles were similar in that the maintenance was done in our own shop, they were kept running as long as possible, and they were only replaced when it became absolutely necessary because it was costing more money to keep them on the road than to reasonably replace them.

In comes the concept of leasing. My family never bought into the idea of leasing a new vehicle because they perceived it as no more than renting a car. "What do you have to show for all those payments once your lease is up?" But there's no doubt that the auto manufactures created leasing options to accommodate a perceivable change in the way American consumers wanted to buy cars. (does anybody out there know the timeframe of the first leasing options?)

Somewhere around the same time that Chevy van met its demise, I recall seeing an article of the World Evening News. Dan Rather announced in the background as footage from one of the major autoshows rolled debuting the (then) new Ford Contour. It was marketed with a '100,000 mile engine' that needed no real maintenance before one-hundred-thousand miles. I was awe-struck. Not in wonder and amazement, but I felt that this concept would change the world of the automobile. Well, in the greater scheme of things, the Ford Contour really never made more than a small ripple in the bucket, but I think the mentality has stuck around.

A car that's more than 5 years old now is practically driven into the dirt. At this point, the majority of '02 cars look as if they're on their last leg and it's almost guaranteed that the owner has sucked most of the value right out of it. Granted, I'm in a different financial situation than my parents were in my youth, but it would be very difficult for me to ever consider buying a used car and my warped common sense will likely continue to prevent me keeping a car for more than three or four years.

I know I'm kind of rambling here, but it all has me wondering. Has the American car-buying public changed our impression of cars and car ownership because of change in our values and perceptions in general, or have the car manufacturers changed how they design and market cars to fit our shifting consumerism?

What do you think?

acolds
03-11-2007, 07:32 PM
I started to drive in 1960 in 1953 Studebaker v-8 with overdrive changing oil, setting points, Plugs, Adjusting brakes , all part of owning a car and enjoing it. Most people drove 10,000 miles a year. Brakes in the old days lasted about the same as now tires are better but I've never gotten the service that everyone talks about. Front wheel drive cars eat tires and front brakes. I never had to replace brake drum on a Studebaker or any car with drum brakes can't say the same for disc brakes. New cars do have better rust protection . But try and fix a dead ignition system on a new car. In old days pull off plug wire look at coil for spark take off air cleaner look for gas when pump linkage.all problems could be fixed.

acolds
03-11-2007, 07:32 PM
I started to drive in 1960 in 1953 Studebaker v-8 with overdrive changing oil, setting points, Plugs, Adjusting brakes , all part of owning a car and enjoing it. Most people drove 10,000 miles a year. Brakes in the old days lasted about the same as now tires are better but I've never gotten the service that everyone talks about. Front wheel drive cars eat tires and front brakes. I never had to replace brake drum on a Studebaker or any car with drum brakes can't say the same for disc brakes. New cars do have better rust protection . But try and fix a dead ignition system on a new car. In old days pull off plug wire look at coil for spark take off air cleaner look for gas when pump linkage.all problems could be fixed.

52 Ragtop
03-11-2007, 07:53 PM
And how many people remember to pack the rear wheel bearings every 20,000 miles? And not to get anybody upset, but,do you know that it is suggested that rubber brake hoses should be replaced every 3 years?
Weather you believe it or not, it IS a safety item! At least check them visually! if you see any cracks or seepage replace them, they are not that expensive. While at it, check fuel lines rad hoses etc.
These things are a LOT easier to fix in your garage or driveway then along an interstate hyway!
Since the "car season" is almost here, it'sa good time to do a good once over on your cars.

Jim

52 Ragtop
03-11-2007, 07:53 PM
And how many people remember to pack the rear wheel bearings every 20,000 miles? And not to get anybody upset, but,do you know that it is suggested that rubber brake hoses should be replaced every 3 years?
Weather you believe it or not, it IS a safety item! At least check them visually! if you see any cracks or seepage replace them, they are not that expensive. While at it, check fuel lines rad hoses etc.
These things are a LOT easier to fix in your garage or driveway then along an interstate hyway!
Since the "car season" is almost here, it'sa good time to do a good once over on your cars.

Jim

tstclr
03-11-2007, 08:05 PM
Being a service manager at a GM store, I see it all. Since GM adopted the "oil life monitor", we don't see many cars for about 6000 miles for oil changes. All GM asks the customer to do other than the oil changes for the first 60000 miles is to have a semi-annual inspection. Geez, the customer's HATE spending $59.95 every 6 months to ensure everything is ok. We recommend brake servicing once a year (clean and lube caliper slides and pins, clean and adjust rear brakes-our climate does take a toll on these items!) and alot of customers think we are trying to take them when we recommend this!
Todd


63 Lark 2dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/larkavitar.jpg

tstclr
03-11-2007, 08:05 PM
Being a service manager at a GM store, I see it all. Since GM adopted the "oil life monitor", we don't see many cars for about 6000 miles for oil changes. All GM asks the customer to do other than the oil changes for the first 60000 miles is to have a semi-annual inspection. Geez, the customer's HATE spending $59.95 every 6 months to ensure everything is ok. We recommend brake servicing once a year (clean and lube caliper slides and pins, clean and adjust rear brakes-our climate does take a toll on these items!) and alot of customers think we are trying to take them when we recommend this!
Todd


63 Lark 2dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/larkavitar.jpg

mapman
03-11-2007, 08:41 PM
Interesting topic. One thing I think about is not only the cars but the roads. When Studebaker stopped making cars the freeway system wasn't complete (is it now?). Many of the cars spent there lives on dirt and gravel roads and streets. Our Idaho roads are often refered to as goat trails. The dirt infiltrated every possible nook and cranny. I have often bought cars that used so much oil that the PO said they were shot. Clean the engine thouroughly and the oil consumption was reduced to nil. The dirt was so packed around the seals that they couldn't seal. No they weren't all Studebakers but that is a part of maintenance that is often overlooked. We've all seen show cars that you wouldn't dare open the hood on. The modern cars have to meet such strict pollution regulations that the engines are in better condition at 100,000 miles than many of the older cars were when they were new. The machine work and lubricants are just that much better. I would still rather drive my old cars but then I don't have to worry about breaking down in rush hour traffic on the freeway. (The nearest freeway is 75 miles away) My recent trip to LA made me appreciate my locale.
Rob

mapman
03-11-2007, 08:41 PM
Interesting topic. One thing I think about is not only the cars but the roads. When Studebaker stopped making cars the freeway system wasn't complete (is it now?). Many of the cars spent there lives on dirt and gravel roads and streets. Our Idaho roads are often refered to as goat trails. The dirt infiltrated every possible nook and cranny. I have often bought cars that used so much oil that the PO said they were shot. Clean the engine thouroughly and the oil consumption was reduced to nil. The dirt was so packed around the seals that they couldn't seal. No they weren't all Studebakers but that is a part of maintenance that is often overlooked. We've all seen show cars that you wouldn't dare open the hood on. The modern cars have to meet such strict pollution regulations that the engines are in better condition at 100,000 miles than many of the older cars were when they were new. The machine work and lubricants are just that much better. I would still rather drive my old cars but then I don't have to worry about breaking down in rush hour traffic on the freeway. (The nearest freeway is 75 miles away) My recent trip to LA made me appreciate my locale.
Rob

avantilover
03-11-2007, 08:54 PM
Well Todd, those customers aren't mechanics and probably feel it's unnecessary to have those inspections. Amazing when one considers the cost of a new car.

I own a 2004 Toyota Corolla Wagon which is serviced every 10,000 km (6000mls)and what needs doing is done. Now granted I'm a Courier and drive about 50,000km (30,000mls) a year, I also use 98 Octane petrol to keep the fuel system clean of deposits. The current price of the same vehicle is around $AUD25,000 so I look after it and am sure that I can get at least 300,000km out of it (180,000mls) before getting a new one. I'm constantly amazed at the number of my colleagues who have to take time off to "go to my mechanic" - why they don't do it right the first time is beyond me as we don't earn much and they'd lose lots of money by not working. I get my car serviced at the local Toyota Dealer much to the amusement of some of the aforementioned drivers, but hey it's done on Saturday mornings and I can happily drive away knowing that all I have to do is fuel it, wash it and keep the tyres inflated - how hard is that[?]

There is a lot to be said for "old technology" I like it better myself as you can "see" how it works e.g. compare the mechanical workings to the coldness of electronics.

John Clements
Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
Lockleys South Australia

avantilover
03-11-2007, 08:54 PM
Well Todd, those customers aren't mechanics and probably feel it's unnecessary to have those inspections. Amazing when one considers the cost of a new car.

I own a 2004 Toyota Corolla Wagon which is serviced every 10,000 km (6000mls)and what needs doing is done. Now granted I'm a Courier and drive about 50,000km (30,000mls) a year, I also use 98 Octane petrol to keep the fuel system clean of deposits. The current price of the same vehicle is around $AUD25,000 so I look after it and am sure that I can get at least 300,000km out of it (180,000mls) before getting a new one. I'm constantly amazed at the number of my colleagues who have to take time off to "go to my mechanic" - why they don't do it right the first time is beyond me as we don't earn much and they'd lose lots of money by not working. I get my car serviced at the local Toyota Dealer much to the amusement of some of the aforementioned drivers, but hey it's done on Saturday mornings and I can happily drive away knowing that all I have to do is fuel it, wash it and keep the tyres inflated - how hard is that[?]

There is a lot to be said for "old technology" I like it better myself as you can "see" how it works e.g. compare the mechanical workings to the coldness of electronics.

John Clements
Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
Lockleys South Australia

studeclunker
03-11-2007, 10:33 PM
My biggest problem is the size of the new cars. I just drove a friends Toyota pickup to the hardware store today. It's the third time I've driven the thing. Toyota makes a nice truck. They just make that truck for people 5'11" and under. At 6'4" with a bad back and joints, most new cars are torture chambers for me. I can drive them short distances and that's all. My Champ falls into that catagory as well, unfortuneately.

I do remember full service stations at 50+ years. In fact, I remember this because a full service station is all that I was allowed to use when driving my Grandmother's/Mum's car. They took good care of that old wagon. In fact, they marvelled that one oil change was all it ever needed that year. It was also serviced once that year.

I so wish that there was the money to restore my current cars to new condition. Alas, there isn't. So I currently attempt to cope with worn out cars. Better though, much better, than trying to fold into and endure the only model of new car I could afford.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

studeclunker
03-11-2007, 10:33 PM
My biggest problem is the size of the new cars. I just drove a friends Toyota pickup to the hardware store today. It's the third time I've driven the thing. Toyota makes a nice truck. They just make that truck for people 5'11" and under. At 6'4" with a bad back and joints, most new cars are torture chambers for me. I can drive them short distances and that's all. My Champ falls into that catagory as well, unfortuneately.

I do remember full service stations at 50+ years. In fact, I remember this because a full service station is all that I was allowed to use when driving my Grandmother's/Mum's car. They took good care of that old wagon. In fact, they marvelled that one oil change was all it ever needed that year. It was also serviced once that year.

I so wish that there was the money to restore my current cars to new condition. Alas, there isn't. So I currently attempt to cope with worn out cars. Better though, much better, than trying to fold into and endure the only model of new car I could afford.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

stude freak
03-11-2007, 11:05 PM
My "first" job was at full service station my dad had.I pumped gas checked and added oil,washed windshield ,checked air in tires or whatever the customer wanted at the tender age of ten.My dad also installed the 'new 'plastic looking seat covers .I fixed flats.Gosh how i hated the rims on old plymouths and the 57 chevys,14 inch had to be taken off from the back and had the rimlock. Man that was the day.I wonder if the majority of todays drivers know what an inner tube is?The pay was great ,I got three meals a day and a place to sleep.



David Baggett Mantachie,Ms.

stude freak
03-11-2007, 11:05 PM
My "first" job was at full service station my dad had.I pumped gas checked and added oil,washed windshield ,checked air in tires or whatever the customer wanted at the tender age of ten.My dad also installed the 'new 'plastic looking seat covers .I fixed flats.Gosh how i hated the rims on old plymouths and the 57 chevys,14 inch had to be taken off from the back and had the rimlock. Man that was the day.I wonder if the majority of todays drivers know what an inner tube is?The pay was great ,I got three meals a day and a place to sleep.



David Baggett Mantachie,Ms.

avantilover
03-11-2007, 11:33 PM
More importantly you got lots of experience that has stood you in good stead over the years.

John Clements
Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
Lockleys South Australia

avantilover
03-11-2007, 11:33 PM
More importantly you got lots of experience that has stood you in good stead over the years.

John Clements
Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
Lockleys South Australia

53k
03-12-2007, 06:41 AM
My '64 Daytona Wagonaire came from the factory with extended interval lubrication (3,000 miles between greasing). The fitting were rubber plugs that had to be removed and replaced with zerks at the first grease job. Dealers just threw them away and left in the zerks.
FWIW, the original pads on my disk brakes lasted 85,000 miles (rear brakes- 110,000) and, unlike modern cars, my rotors have never needed turning or replacement.


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

53k
03-12-2007, 06:41 AM
My '64 Daytona Wagonaire came from the factory with extended interval lubrication (3,000 miles between greasing). The fitting were rubber plugs that had to be removed and replaced with zerks at the first grease job. Dealers just threw them away and left in the zerks.
FWIW, the original pads on my disk brakes lasted 85,000 miles (rear brakes- 110,000) and, unlike modern cars, my rotors have never needed turning or replacement.


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

raprice
03-12-2007, 07:41 AM
My high school and college years spanned the '50s. During that time, and the time of a lot of our Studebakers, I changed my oil every 3,000 miles and did a grease job at the same time. Tune-ups were performed every 10,000 miles and that included points, plugs and condenser. Sometimes the rotor and dist. cap needed to be replaced too. We didn't give it a second thought. Owning my '59 Lark brings me back to those uncomplicated days and I love it.
It's true that modern iron kind of lulls us into a stupor when it comes to service. For some reason, I still change my oil at 3,000 miles. When I sold my '97 Taurus, it had 168,000 miles and never burnt a drop of oil. The engine was still in terrific condition.
Rog

'59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop

raprice
03-12-2007, 07:41 AM
My high school and college years spanned the '50s. During that time, and the time of a lot of our Studebakers, I changed my oil every 3,000 miles and did a grease job at the same time. Tune-ups were performed every 10,000 miles and that included points, plugs and condenser. Sometimes the rotor and dist. cap needed to be replaced too. We didn't give it a second thought. Owning my '59 Lark brings me back to those uncomplicated days and I love it.
It's true that modern iron kind of lulls us into a stupor when it comes to service. For some reason, I still change my oil at 3,000 miles. When I sold my '97 Taurus, it had 168,000 miles and never burnt a drop of oil. The engine was still in terrific condition.
Rog

'59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop

hank63
03-12-2007, 08:17 AM
My classics are missing 3 things (thankfully).
No electronics
No plastic
No depreciation
Sure, some items require regular service, but if looked after they will last and last and last ................
The "plastic, fantastic" self-destruct cars they peddle these days, are nothing more than a poor image of a real car. And the price ........
No, I'll stick to my classics, thank you.
/ H

hank63
03-12-2007, 08:17 AM
My classics are missing 3 things (thankfully).
No electronics
No plastic
No depreciation
Sure, some items require regular service, but if looked after they will last and last and last ................
The "plastic, fantastic" self-destruct cars they peddle these days, are nothing more than a poor image of a real car. And the price ........
No, I'll stick to my classics, thank you.
/ H

rusty nut garage
03-13-2007, 08:30 AM
I too believe that the majority of neglect comes from people who aren't aware of whats required maintenace wise for these cars.
Our local chapter conducts tech sessions throughout the year and the monthly newsletter also includes a tech session to remind and teach people how and what needs maintained.
Russ

Russ Shop Foreman "Rusty Nut Garage"
57 SH (project)
60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

rusty nut garage
03-13-2007, 08:30 AM
I too believe that the majority of neglect comes from people who aren't aware of whats required maintenace wise for these cars.
Our local chapter conducts tech sessions throughout the year and the monthly newsletter also includes a tech session to remind and teach people how and what needs maintained.
Russ

Russ Shop Foreman "Rusty Nut Garage"
57 SH (project)
60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)