PDA

View Full Version : 224 V8 Surprise today



jclary
11-05-2009, 05:42 PM
Since dragging this old 55 E-12 truck home, I have not had much time to devote to it. I am trying to do a little each day to tear it down and evaluate what is salvageable. Today I was only able to take the inside cab fender nuts off on the driver side. It was getting dark and as I was studying the location of the nuts and bolts and sequence I need to proceed...I caught a glimpse of something I thought was odd for a 1955 vehicle. The darned little V8 engine has a "Starting Jaw" on the end of the crank shaft! I have seen "hand cranks" on older pre-war cars and some later farm equipment, but I did not think they would have been on a vehicle of this vintage. My little 6 cylinder does not have this. I looked from the front...and there is a straight shot over the bumper and under the grille and radiator for a hand crank to fit through. Anybody ever see this set up? Also, was an actual hand crank rod offered for these models?


John Clary
Greer, SC
http://i518.photobucket.com/albums/u346/jconln/HPIM0372-2.jpg
Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
SDC member since 1975

mbstude
11-05-2009, 05:46 PM
My granddad's 224 powered '55 pickup has that. The '51 2R16 dump truck he has also has it (Big 6 powered). The dump truck still has the hand crank with it.

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, GA

Roscomacaw
11-05-2009, 05:48 PM
John, I pulled one off a 224 just about 6 weeks ago. It was a truck 224 that had found a home in a '59 Lark. T'was the first I'd seen on a Stude V8. I have seen these on BIG 6s from the 40s. I'd be wary of starting with one of these![xx(]

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/58_Avatar.jpg
1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

rockinhawk
11-05-2009, 06:04 PM
They come in handy for rotating the engine while working on it. NT


Neil Thornton
Hazlehurst, GA
'57 Silver Hawk
'56 Sky Hawk
'51 2R16 dump truck
Many others.
http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/avatar2.jpg

comatus
11-05-2009, 06:26 PM
Legend has it ("my dad says") that sockets for a starting crank were required by law for commercial vehicles, on a state by state basis, well into the 1950's. The 1948 Ford F-6 I learned to drive on had "the hole." I think our '56 did too.

There was either a safety justification for this (avoiding trucks stranded by electrical failure), or the crank-handle and buggy-whip lobby bought some very expensive legislators.

jclary
11-05-2009, 06:46 PM
I was just curious about it. I might try to improvise a crank rod just to try to see if the engine is free. However, my original plan is to take the front clip off the truck for easy access before fooling with the engine.

John Clary
Greer, SC
http://i518.photobucket.com/albums/u346/jconln/HPIM0372-2.jpg
Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
SDC member since 1975

Milaca
11-05-2009, 06:56 PM
I can't imagine actually starting an engine of this type with a hand crank being that it has higher compression and more cubic inch displacement than the farm tractors that were equipped with a crank. I would think that the engine would at least need a petcock valve for decompression for each cylinder in order to rotate the crank fast enough to start. Although I guess if the engine is in great shape and you have hot spark and fuel in the cylinder ready & waiting, it wouldnt take but a nudge to get it started.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3473/3939471781_afa477b3ae_t.jpg
Brent's rootbeer racer.
MN iron ore...it does your body good.

JRoberts
11-05-2009, 07:36 PM
A former member of our chapter had a 2r16 with that set up and at car shows he would spend most of the day starting his truck with the crank. In is case it would fire up with only a portion of a single turn of the crank. It started so easily and was so quiet (you know how those Commander 8's are) that often people did not believe the engine had actually been started. It was always fun to park near him and his truck.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

Roscomacaw
11-05-2009, 08:48 PM
In my "classic car days", we had a little GP racer of 1920 vintage. Little four cylinder engine that didn't even have a starter. I hated that car. For one thing, it had been built for one tiny little driver! Secondly, my arm would give out in the course of trying to get the da*med thing started![xx(]



http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/58_Avatar.jpg
1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

clonelark
11-06-2009, 08:39 AM
I remember seeing that on your engine, i have a crank some where, may have been off my 1935 Chevy 2 dr sedan, i use to hand crank just for the fun of it.

http://i37.tinypic.com/i1wqc9.jpg

clonelark
11-06-2009, 08:40 AM
I remember seeing that on your engine, i have a crank some where, may have been off my 1935 Chevy 2 dr sedan, i use to hand crank just for the fun of it.

http://i37.tinypic.com/i1wqc9.jpg

Skip Lackie
11-06-2009, 08:55 AM
The Commander 6 engines all came with a starting jaw until the end in 1960. However, the 1956 E models were the last trucks that had the hole for the crank. According to the parts book, all export trucks were equipped with the starting jaw and a crank (plus a few other tools).

Skip Lackie
Washington DC

jclary
11-06-2009, 09:01 AM
You know that the crank mechanisms (officially known as a "starting jaw") are designed to disengage as the engine fires. However, with rust and abuse, the crank handles can stick or bind. The real hazard is in "back fire" situations where the engine kicks back. When I was young...during plowing in the fall and spring, it was not unusual to see a few of your friends show up at church and school with an arm in a cast and sling due to an engine kicking back throwing the crank around breaking an arm. I never had that problem due to the fact that we couldn't afford a tractor. Our mule was too lazy to kick back.:):):)

John Clary
Greer, SC
http://i518.photobucket.com/albums/u346/jconln/HPIM0372-2.jpg
Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
SDC member since 1975

Guido
11-06-2009, 10:21 AM
The danger of kick back can be lessened by how you grip the handle. If you wrap your fingers around it you are asking for trouble. However, if you use an open hand you stand a better chance of avoiding injury.

I have had several tractors with hand cranks and used them. However, I have never started anything larger than a Farmall M with one.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
11-06-2009, 03:47 PM
John,

I got pictures of the cab today and sent you a link to the Webshots album.

Gary

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
11-17-2009, 08:46 PM
John,

Take two on a possible replacement cab for you:

http://community.webshots.com/album/575566627GLyGCr

Gary

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

gordr
11-18-2009, 12:34 AM
Having the right grip is important. Also you want to pull the crank handle through compression, not push it through. That way, if it kicks back, it knocks your fingers aside, hopefully without busting any. And if you are quick on the recoil, the crank won't get you on Round Two.

If you "push" the crank handle through compression, a kick-back drives right back at your arm.

On the engines I have hand-cranked, I would slowly bring it up on compression, and then give the handle a quick flip through by pulling it. Never got bit.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Guido
11-18-2009, 06:42 AM
Gord is correct and I should have elaborated in my post. When people get in trouble is when they grab the handle and wand to spin it multiple times rather than just once.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.