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907-1958 CHAMPION
07-30-2009, 01:27 PM
I AM LOOKING AT A 4 DR LARK, 59,60,61? LOOKS PRETTY ORIGINAL, V-8 STILL THERE, MISSING BACK WINDOW, LOTS OF DENTS, DOORS AND FENDERS. TRYING TO GET MORE INFO, DOES ANYONE HAVE AN OPINION ON WHAT IT WOULD BE WORTH......HOW MUCH WOULD YOU PAY FOR IT?

studegary
07-30-2009, 01:49 PM
I wouldn't pay much above parts car prices because there are better Larks available for restoration or to use as a driver. If you just want it as a project to tackle, fine, but with the information provided, I wouldn't go over $500.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

r1lark
07-30-2009, 01:51 PM
*Model (Deluxe, Regal, Cruiser...)?
*Does it run?
*Does it drive?
*Amount of rust in floorboards/doors/fenders/trunk?
*Interior condition?
*Transmission type?
*Pictures?

Pretty much everyone here on this Forum is willing to help out, but to even get somewhat close on a value we need more information then you have provided.

Paul
Winston-Salem, NC
Visit The NEW Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

StudeRich
07-30-2009, 01:59 PM
The year and body type can be identified by coping the info from the body tag on the passenger side of the firewall (engine side)

Also the Serial Number plate is on the drivers' door hinge post, and will also I.D. only the model year and Mfg. sequence among Eight Cylinder Studebakers that year, at that Plant, South Bend, IN USA or Canada. For U.S. cars, it should start with 59V, 60V or 61V.

Good luck with getting more info so we can help more! :)

StudeRich

jclary
07-30-2009, 02:01 PM
Some of these cars (not just Studebakers) are so far gone that the Junk yard scrappers will charge you to come haul it off. In many cases, the cost of picking them up and hauling them off exceeds the scrap value.:(

John Clary
Greer, SC
http://i518.photobucket.com/albums/u346/jconln/HPIM0372-2.jpg
Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
SDC member since 1975

Canadoug
07-30-2009, 02:30 PM
question for Studerich . My lack of Studebaker history will be exposed here. Did Studebaker produce 1959 & 1960 Larks in South Bend
and Hamilton ? If so ,do you know the production volume ?

I always assumed my Studebaker Lark was built in the US of A. In 1958. Yes...probably more than likely BUILT in 1958. staying one step ahead of the wise guy's out there...;)


Hey Andy ! ........... Hey Goob

studegary
07-30-2009, 03:14 PM
quote:Originally posted by Canadoug

question for Studerich . My lack of Studebaker history will be exposed here. Did Studebaker produce 1959 & 1960 Larks in South Bend
and Hamilton ? If so ,do you know the production volume ?




Not Studerich, but a stab at an answer.
Yes, Larks were assembled in Hamilton as well as in South Bend.
I could give you exact numbers for a model, but will give you a rough idea by year.
1959 - 125K dom., 7K Can., 5K exp.
1960 - 117K dom., 6K Can., 5K exp.
key: dom. is South Bend production for sale in US, Can. is Hamilton production and exp. is built for export (non-us or Canada)

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

Canadoug
07-30-2009, 03:30 PM
thanks Gary

907-1958 CHAMPION
07-30-2009, 03:39 PM
THANKS A LOT EVERYONE, I'LL GET MORE INFO AND KEEP ALL POSTED, THNKS AGAIN.

barnlark
07-30-2009, 04:38 PM
Gary, or anyone else (Bob Barrick, Craig) isn't there a C in the serial number plate, or engine for any of those built and sold there in Canada for him to check?

Clover Green
07-30-2009, 06:31 PM
Correct, serial numbers starting "59SC" were built in Hamilton. The plate will also clearly identify Canadian built cars.

Andrew
'49 2R5
'59 Lark 2 door waggon
'48 Chev 1 ton

Steve T
07-30-2009, 09:33 PM
...or "59VC" for Hamilton V8s.

buddymander
07-30-2009, 09:54 PM
If it's beat up all over, I hope you love the smell of bondo. And 4-5 hundred would be high. How are the floorpans?

Canadoug
07-31-2009, 02:05 PM
why would Studebaker bother to manufacture -[ and support the cost ]- so few Larks in Hamilton in 59-60 ? As far as I know there were no special requirements for canadian automobiles verses american in the late 50's or 60's. Why not manufacture them all in SB ?

I believe this line of thinking in 59-60 contributed to the failure of Studebaker.

Maybe the Studebaker history experts here can set me straight on this puzzle.


Hey Aunt Bee .......Hello Goober

studegary
07-31-2009, 02:56 PM
13,000 cars is not a low production number in the world of Studebakers. Keep in mind that the cars were only assembled in Canada, they didn't make everything from scratch. It was not that big of a deal to ship train cars of frames, engines, body panels, etc. from South Bend to Hamilton.
There were only 8947 1966 models total.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

Skip Lackie
07-31-2009, 03:19 PM
In those days, there were substantial import duties on cars imported from another country, including to/from Canada/USA. The duties on parts were much lower. These laws, like all import duties, were intended to protect the domestic automobile industries in both countries. It also had the effect of causing the creation of some unique Canadian vehicles from GM, Ford, and Chrysler. Total production of 1959 model Studebaker cars in Canada was 7358 units. That was probably just about as many Studebakers as the Canadian market could absorb.

The US and Canada signed an agreement later (1980s?) that permitted completed cars to be imported by each country without import duties. Later, in the 1990s, NAFTA added Mexico to this agreement. There is now a single North American market for vehicles -- but that wasn't true in 1959.

Skip Lackie
Washington DC

Canadoug
07-31-2009, 08:05 PM
thanks . That is a good explanation. Another question. What was the exchange rate of the dollar in 1959-60 ? Did that contribute ? I'll bet it played a big part in 1965 -1966 ? Just curious.

s2d63lark
07-31-2009, 09:17 PM
Further to Skip's reply about producing in Canada, it also enabled Studebaker to access the British Commonwealth market since anything produced in a Commonwealth Country recieved most favoured nation status in regards to duties amongst other Commonwealth Countries. Many times this meant NO DUTY.

Doug

http://i295.photobucket.com/albums/mm160/lakado/006.jpg 6E40-195 http://i295.photobucket.com/albums/mm160/lakado/The%20Green%20Hornet/Lark.jpg 1963 Canadian Lark VY-6

Chatsworth, Ontario, Canada

Skip Lackie
08-01-2009, 06:57 AM
quote:Originally posted by Canadoug

thanks . That is a good explanation. Another question. What was the exchange rate of the dollar in 1959-60 ? Did that contribute ? I'll bet it played a big part in 1965 -1966 ? Just curious.

As I recall, in the later 1960s the US dollar was generally more valuable, but they were close to parity. I was too young in 59-60 to be paying attention, but I'll bet Google could help you answer that question. More importantly, having a plant in each country meant that production of both cars and parts could be ramped up or down to take advantage of exchange rate changes. Exchange rate changes can be disruptive to the production and pricing of products.

Skip Lackie
Washington DC