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rbruner
07-23-2009, 02:34 PM
Finally broke down & ordered a set of BFG's for the truck. The old Chinese bias plys just don't give me confidence on the hwy. They were shipped to a very reputable installer directly from a reputable supplier. [Coker] Then came the phone call from the installer. The new tires were so compressed on the pallet that they cannot be mounted because of the distortion. They tried everything. Their solution was to install tubes to force the tires into shape and onto the wheels. Fine,dandy & swell or is it? Sure I can complain to Coker but they're installed now. Total bill was $719.00 with shipping & mounting. Those tires aren't the only thing that got mounted, I believe. [:0]

http://i259.photobucket.com/albums/hh295/sbruner_2008/641Champ.jpg

Gunslinger
07-23-2009, 03:33 PM
Coker should hear about it. It's their name and reputation on the line and it's to everyone's interest to know how they respond to customer satisfaction issues. Let everyone know what kind of response you get.




Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

Tennessee hillbilly
07-23-2009, 03:45 PM
I HAD A PROBLEM WITH A SET OF COKER RADIALS A FEW YEARS AGO AND THEY REPLACED THE WHOLE SET AND EVEN PAID SHIPPING BOTH WAYS.

Tennessee Hillbilly
http://i389.photobucket.com/albums/oo333/larkv111/Eds60Larkconvertible001-1.jpg?t=1234128482

PackardV8
07-23-2009, 04:58 PM
FWIW, assuming these were tubeless tires, the installer didn't know or didn't care to take the time to do some of the old school tricks. Back in the bad old days, I was a tire shop manager. When the tire beads wouldn't pull out on to the rim on the machine, the way we did it was to put a ratcheting tie down strap around the circumference of the tire and pull it down tight. This forces the tire beads outward onto the rim. Then, remove the Schrader valve from the valve stem. This passes more air more quickly. When the beads seat, replace the valve. Never had one which wouldn't seal up using this method. Your results may vary.

thnx, jack vines

PackardV8

4-speed wagonaire
07-23-2009, 05:42 PM
quote:Originally posted by PackardV8

FWIW, assuming these were tubeless tires, the installer didn't know or didn't care to take the time to do some of the old school tricks. Back in the bad old days, I was a tire shop manager. When the tire beads wouldn't pull out on to the rim on the machine, the way we did it was to put a ratcheting tie down strap around the circumference of the tire and pull it down tight. This forces the tire beads outward onto the rim. Then, remove the Schrader valve from the valve stem. This passes more air more quickly. When the beads seat, replace the valve. Never had one which wouldn't seal up using this method. Your results may vary.

thnx, jack vines

PackardV8


I do that at home with the smaller rachet straps, works like a charm.

Coker will fix any problem you have with any of their products, they just need to know about it.....

Bill, Many Fords and one great Stude!

stall
07-23-2009, 06:36 PM
I HAD A PROBLEM WITH A SET OF COKER RADIALS A FEW YEARS AGO AND THEY REPLACED THE WHOLE SET AND EVEN PAID SHIPPING BOTH WAYS.

Tennessee Hillbilly
======================================================================

Amen, my last set of Cokers went to h--L in about a year. In
my case the whitewall portion of the radials had little cracks
that widened in a year. They looked like they were 15 years old
in a year and the sidewall scared me. I have Diamond-backs on the Speedster now for the last 3 years and I'm very happy.

Happy Trails

http://sites.google.com/site/intriguingautomotivehistories/

http://studebakerspeedster.blogspot.com/2008/12/studebakers-new-v-8.html

http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u139/awaynow8624/Studebakerbest-2.jpg

StudeMichael
07-23-2009, 06:52 PM
Good luck with Coker tires. They are worthless and do not support the garbage they sell.

1957 Packard Clipper
1957 President Broadmoor
1963 Daytona Convertible
1963 R2 Daytona
1963 R1 Wagonaire
1963 R4 Avanti
1964 Champ
1966 Cruiser

64V-K7
07-23-2009, 07:01 PM
Coker radials on my 55 Pres were purchased in 2002, now have 18,000 miles with no issues..

http://www.studebaker-info.org/7168422/sig2.jpghttp://www.studebaker-info.org/64v2488/sig3.jpghttp://www.studebaker-info.org/0381/sig4.jpg
Bob Johnstone
www.studebaker-info.org

64 GT Hawk
55 President State Sedan
70 Avanti (R3)

Lark Hunter
07-23-2009, 07:01 PM
I personally haven't had a problem with Coker, or their tires. Am I the only one that lucked out?

LH

Dick Steinkamp
07-23-2009, 07:22 PM
No problem here with several sets of Coker tires.

If the new ones are radials, you don't want tubes in them. They generate too much heat.

Jack is right on with the method to seat tires. In fact, most good shops have an adjustable tube to fit around the circumference that can be inflated to force the bead against the rim.



Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/pics066-2-1.jpg

Invalid User Name
07-23-2009, 07:33 PM
I never had one that couldn't be mounted with the strap. I mounted thousands of tires and some were a pain, but they all came around with a little persuasion. That garage should be whipped as well as Coker. $700+ to mount tires??? I would call the BBB.

1950 Champion 9G F1

Thomas63R2
07-23-2009, 09:05 PM
Coker BFG tubeless bias plys here. No issues, and they have done a great job of holding air pressure.

Thomas

Long time hot rodder
Packrat junk collector
'63 Avanti R2 4 speed

bams50
07-23-2009, 09:58 PM
Your tire shop is the problem. Any decent tire shop has the inflatable bands. If that doesn't work there are plenty of other methods. One of the best is an "air cannon". This is a high-pressure, hand-held tank a bit smaller than a propane tank. It has a trigger-type valve and a wide, flat, curved nozzle about 1" high by 6" wide. The tank is inflated to a high pressure. The air valve is clipped to the valve stem, then the tank nozzle is positioned at the tire bead. The valve is then triggered shooting a high-pressure, high-volume blast of air into the tire. The shock of it pops both beads on instantly. Another trick with difficult tires is to lay them out in the sun for an hour or two before you attempt mounting them.

I've been involved in the business literally all my life and have never seen one new tire that HAD to have tubes to seat them, let alone a whole set[B)]

Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.patrioticon.org/images/flag3-1.gif

BobPalma
07-23-2009, 10:05 PM
:) Agree with Bams, Dick, Jack, etc; the tire shop is the problem.

If they know all the tricks, one of them will work.

It's OK to leave the tubes in them if they are radial-specific tubes and have little vent slots around the valve stem to vent air and pressure from inside the tubeless wheel.

But they shouldn't have been needed or used in the first place. :DBP

Roscomacaw
07-24-2009, 12:18 AM
55Pres,

In '01 I put fresh tires on my Transtar. I actually was forced to because one of a 9-year old set of radials had blown out and ruined a fender.:(
Last fall, one of those '01 vintage (Armstrong) tires (with relatively low miles on them) blew out and took out another rear fender. '02 to '09 is seven years old. I speak from harsh experience.[xx(]

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

rbruner
07-24-2009, 03:57 PM
I talked to Coker customer service & they agree with a majority of forum members that the installer messed up. They are a well established family owned operation that offers free shuttle service. I must clarify that the tires are tubeless BFG 4 ply. The price delivered was $605. Installation & tubes was $114. Obviously another hard lesson learned. I intend to show the company a printout of this forum. Hopefully I will receive a response. Thanks to everyone for your professional advice!

http://i259.photobucket.com/albums/hh295/sbruner_2008/641Champ.jpg

StudeDave57
07-24-2009, 06:31 PM
After reading this post, I feel that several things must be said here. Coker is a TOP NOTCH company who works VERY hard for your business They sell 2 brands of radial WWW tires~ BFG is one of them (last time I checked) If your installer had called them, I'll bet they'd help fix your problem I think I'd be showin' this thread to your installer, if I were you... ;) :D [}:)] [:0]
Other folks may have various opinions~ but this is mine, and I'm stickin' to it!!!

(from my perspective as a Coker customer- many times over)


StudeDave '57 [8D]

curt
07-24-2009, 07:41 PM
'55 Prez, the 18,000 mile ntires purchased in 2002 need to be replaced in my opinion. Seven years is the max for tire AGE.

mausersmth
07-24-2009, 10:06 PM
If your car is used as a hobby, age will kill the tires. After four years I would examine the tires for signs of age, cracking and fading.

Many Wide White radials are made for hobby use and not for serious mileage. The one exception I know of is Diamond Back. As one who has sold off my Brand X vehicles (Exc. my uncle's F-250!) my Studes will need rugged tires.

A. Charles Eck, Jr.
Essex, MD
http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa307/mausersmth/64%20Cruiser/DSCF0085-1.jpghttp://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa307/mausersmth/57%20Commander/100_1155-1.jpg
Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)

'64 Cruiser 'Louise'
'57 Commander 4 door sedan 'Bluebird'
'66 Ford F-250
'53 John Deere 50
'41 John Deere H All-Fuel
'41 John Deere B All-Fuel

studeclunker
07-24-2009, 10:19 PM
Well, if opinions are being posted here... I'd say the tire shop saw a Rube coming in with his Coker tyres and took you all three ways.[V] If one was going to report them to the B.B.B. I'd suggest an explanitory letter from Coker detailing that the shop didn't even bother contacting them. It really sounds like the shop just wanted to con you into a very expensive set of tubes.[}:)];) B.T.D.T. and walked funny for a week afterwards too![B)][:o)]

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/december%2006/HPIM0234.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

studegary
07-25-2009, 12:40 PM
To me, the main problems were the place that you took the tires to either didn't know how to mount tires and used tubes that they shouldn't have used or were one of the many places that don't like customers to bring things in to their shop for them to install - they want to make the profit on the item (big on tires).

For modern cars, I use Tire Rack as a shopping guide. Around here, at least, I can't get a set of car tires mounted and balanced for the $114 that you mentioned as including the tubes. I take the Tire Rack price and add shipping and mounting (at one of their recommended locations) and I can usually do better buying the same tires directly from a local business.

I usually replace tires that are eight or nine years old, no matter the mileage or tread remaining, even though we live in a temperate climate and the vehicles are garaged.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

DEEPNHOCK
07-25-2009, 01:49 PM
Without naming names or pointing fingers.....

Remember when tires were wrapped individually?
Same issue, especially with tubeless.
Storing tires horizontally will cause that.
It is more of an installer problem than a tire problem.
There are several ways to get a tire up onto the bead to start to put air into the tire.
Sounds like inexperience, or a lack of proper tools to me.
My suggestion?
Go to a reputeable, experienced tire mounter, and have them remove your tubes and re-mount the tires.
(Or quote you on doing that)
Then return to the place that put the tubes in and demand a refund for the tubes and labor.
(Use the quote as leverage)
Chances are, the tires will re-mount easily once the tubes are out now that they have been on the rims for a few days.
Food for thought...
Jeff[8D]

sasquatch
07-25-2009, 03:22 PM
I'm surprised no one mentioned the off-roaders favorite method of getting a tire sealed to the wheel: WD40.:D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSDPHjo1zRU

Rick
Kingman, AZ
http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff171/sasquatch46/IMG_3711_1-1.jpg
"Leroy"

rbruner
07-25-2009, 03:33 PM
Okay, the installer is Hay Tire in Chas. SC. Check out their website. They recommended that I get the tires from Coker in the first place. Thanks for further input.

http://i259.photobucket.com/albums/hh295/sbruner_2008/641Champ.jpg