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hotrodstude
06-02-2009, 08:14 AM
if i remember right my 57 commander had right hand thread lug nuts on one side and left on the other. were the larks the same way? and i forgot which was which?

rusty nut garage
06-02-2009, 08:33 AM
Left on Left, not sure about the Larks, seems like by 59 or 60 they went with RH thread all the way around but I'm not certain


quote:Originally posted by hotrodstude

if i remember right my 57 commander had right hand thread lug nuts on one side and left on the other. were the larks the same way? and i forgot which was which?


http://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp100/rustynutgarage/100_0133-1.jpg
Russ Shop Foreman "Rusty Nut Garage"
53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
57 SH (project)
60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

BobPalma
06-02-2009, 08:40 AM
:) 1958 was the final model year for the left-hand / right-hand thread arrangement. For the 1959 model year and beyond, Studebakers had conventional, right-hand threads on all wheel studs. :DBP

Lark Parker
06-02-2009, 08:45 AM
Was that something left over from the wagon wheel nut days?
Or did wagon wheels use the left hand nuts?

Don't ask me why I want to know, I just do.
(R.Quinn already did that to me concerning a 1939 window decal
in one of his photos.)

LP

tbredehoft
06-02-2009, 09:53 AM
I've always assumed that the left hand axle nut on a wagon might unscrew due to friction from the wheel. Note that's the Axle nut, not wheel nuts. And additionally, I've assumed the logic for the left hand threads continued when they mounted the wheel on a drum, although the friction would no longer be affecting the nuts. It took them in excess of 50 years to realize this, I guess.

As you can see, this is all speculation, and I'm quite ready to change, should documentation rear its' ugly head.

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Avatar1.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe (since 1959)
'55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
(Under Construction 617 hrs.)
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All Indiana built cars

Dick Steinkamp
06-02-2009, 10:02 AM
quote:Originally posted by Tom B

I've always assumed that the left hand axle nut on a wagon might unscrew due to friction from the wheel. Note that's the Axle nut, not wheel nuts. And additionally, I've assumed the logic for the left hand threads continued when they mounted the wheel on a drum, although the friction would no longer be affecting the nuts. It took them in excess of 50 years to realize this, I guess.

As you can see, this is all speculation, and I'm quite ready to change, should documentation rear its' ugly head.





It's called "fretting induced precision".

(I had to look it up too :))

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precession_(mechanical)

Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/pics075-1-1.jpg

StudeRich
06-02-2009, 04:12 PM
This process may not be as obsolete as we think!

I understand that most or all Heavy Trucks still do that; i.e. Kenworth, Peterbuilt in particular.

StudeRich

leyrret
06-02-2009, 05:19 PM
"I understand that most or all Heavy Trucks still do that; i.e. Kenworth, Peterbuilt in particular."

Budd wheels have always been this way. Dayton(open wheel with spoked hub) are all right hand. There is a later pilot hub wheel that uses
metric nuts with integral washers similar to Budd wheel that is also all right hand. One curious thing I've seen a couple of times is the outer locknut on wheel bearing on a older Mack rear, right side. Inner nut stays in adjustment and wheel itself not loose. Just the outer nut bouncing around on the axle until no threads left in nut. It is a jam nut with no bent tab lock. I've seen this a couple of times always on the right side.

BobGlasscock
06-02-2009, 05:27 PM
A little removed from the auto field, but pump motors are threaded for a LH bolt to hold the impellor on during CCW spinning and stopping. Ancient technology lives on.

'50 Champion, 1 family owner
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff019.jpghttp://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff018.jpg

rusty nut garage
06-02-2009, 05:27 PM
some rv's still use this practice, ask a non mechanical buddy of mine. He struggled to get the wheels off his tent trailer. didn't want to bother me. Finally his wife intervenes and calls me to help, I get my large cheater pipe biggest break over etc, I show up and this trailer uses taper lug bolts instead of a nut and right on the head of the bolt is this big "L". He was quite embarrassed so I went ahead and rubbed it in.
Mopar products also used LH lugs thru the sixty's and maybe 70's if my memory serve me correctly.

quote:Originally posted by StudeRich

This process may not be as obsolete as we think!

I understand that most or all Heavy Trucks still do that; i.e. Kenworth, Peterbuilt in particular.

StudeRich


http://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp100/rustynutgarage/100_0133-1.jpg
Russ Shop Foreman "Rusty Nut Garage"
53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
57 SH (project)
60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

Desert Explorer
06-02-2009, 07:02 PM
Every old Mopar vehicle I have ever worked on has the same reversed wheel lug nuts on the left side. Back when I was a lad the shop teacher said it was because of the loosening possible caused bi wheel vibration and direction of travel..................

He totally FAILED to mention when I got myself an old 55 stude I would have to look out for the same thing!

55 Commander Regal Coupe
XA Bat (The Roadwarrior)
KARR (Knightrider)
Eleanor (ORIGINAL Gone in 60 Seconds)


Mad Max Car's "Hero Car Ranch"; Seattle, Wa.

rockne10
06-02-2009, 07:18 PM
I suppose the carburetor accelerator pump lever is screwed on with left threads because of the high RPMs.[:o)]

Blue 15G
06-03-2009, 01:42 PM
FWIW, 1970 was the final model year that Chrysler products used the left hand lug nuts.

Dave Bonn
54 Champion Starliner

rusty nut garage
06-03-2009, 01:46 PM
coincidentally that's about the last year mo-par I'd want to own :D

quote:Originally posted by Blue 15G

FWIW, 1970 was the final model year that Chrysler products used the left hand lug nuts.

Dave Bonn
54 Champion Starliner


http://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp100/rustynutgarage/100_0133-1.jpg
Russ Shop Foreman "Rusty Nut Garage"
53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
57 SH (project)
60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

dictator27
06-03-2009, 02:53 PM
Instead of a fan hub, my 27 Dictator uses left hand threads on a shaft for the fan blade. A little OT, but my Dictator also uses a lefthanded crankshaft.

Terry

Mater
06-03-2009, 10:07 PM
so then would I be out of my mind to want to change the drivers side to right hand thread studs??? I could see how it could affect hub nuts, but not lug nuts!...
Gary

52-fan
06-04-2009, 10:50 AM
Lots of us have changed to right hand threads on the left side with no ill effects. It makes it simpler for a non Stude person to keep from ruining your lugs at a tire shop or the like.

http://i152.photobucket.com/albums/s186/52-fan/StudebakersofArkansas2-1.jpg
1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, both w/overdrive.Searcy,Arkansas
"I may be lazy, but I'm not shiftless."

warrlaw1
06-04-2009, 12:17 PM
I guess it wouldn't be a judging issue if I covered them with a full disk anyway. I think my 55 will be RH all the way around.

55s
06-04-2009, 06:35 PM
We have a Dodge Stratus with aluminum wheels and only RH threads.

The wheel nuts sometimes loosen by themselves even when they are torqued by hand.

Maybe they did know what they were doing.

Paul

Dan Timberlake
06-05-2009, 09:32 AM
quote:Originally posted by 55s

We have a Dodge Stratus with aluminum wheels and only RH threads.
The wheel nuts sometimes loosen by themselves even when they are torqued by hand.

Maybe they did know what they were doing.

Paul


Only if the nuts stayed tight on the right side of the car. :D

Many Alloy car and truck wheels have the reputation for loosening. Buy tires at Sears and the invoice has a statement that cars with alloy wheels must be brought back in 10 days to have the lugs re-torqued.

I think that is because in a hard-working bolted structural joint there needs to be something flexible to maintain preload to prevent loosening, among other things. The best solution is a bolt with 6 or more diameters of "grip length" (the stretchable length between the underside of the bolt head and nut or start of engaged threads).
Wheel studs are too short to elongage much when torqued, so most automotive steel wheels are arched near each lug hole to provide some flex, like a belleville washer
http://theserviceadvisor.com/part/images/products/keystone/hgo98680f.jpg

Alloy wheels are typically solid under the lug, so flexibility is very low, and preload is lost as soon as any embedment or micro-yielding occurs. The loss of preload is what allows easy loosening.

52-fan
06-05-2009, 10:50 AM
On my 62 Hawk that had alloy wheels and chrome lug nuts I finally had to start using Loctite after losing the left front wheel twice! [:0]This was with left hand threads. Fortunately, both times the wheel came off, I was barely moving.

http://i152.photobucket.com/albums/s186/52-fan/StudebakersofArkansas2-1.jpg
1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, both w/overdrive.Searcy,Arkansas
"I may be lazy, but I'm not shiftless."