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View Full Version : Rail as a long distance shipping option



56H-Y6
11-10-2008, 07:39 AM
Hi

In various threads, the prohibitive cost of long distance shipping by trucks is named as the limit to acting.

Has anyone used shipping by rail?

What was your experience and cost like?

With the slump in new car sales, there have to be fleets of car transporter railcars that carry 12-16 vehicle stored in yards.

I have wondered whether a group of enthusiast in the eastern U.S. could contract for a railcar to start in California, loaded with cars purchased there and on the way, to be spotted centrally for unloading to the buyers here.

Your experiences and thoughts?

Steve

8E45E
11-10-2008, 07:54 AM
quote:Originally posted by 56H-Y6

Hi

In various threads, the prohibitive cost of long distance shipping by trucks is named as the limit to acting.

Has anyone used shipping by rail?

What was your experience and cost like?

With the slump in new car sales, there have to be fleets of car transporter railcars that carry 12-16 vehicle stored in yards.

I have wondered whether a group of enthusiast in the eastern U.S. could contract for a railcar to start in California, loaded with cars purchased there and on the way, to be spotted centrally for unloading to the buyers here.

Your experiences and thoughts?

Steve



From what point to what point? I'd be concerned about which big cities the main rail line runs through. They always seem to go through some of the roughest and dangerous areas of town. Have you seen some the 'decoration' on the sides of boxcars, tankers, et al. these days? I'd be afraid a passenger car or truck riding exposed on a train would end up the same.

Craig

56H-Y6
11-10-2008, 10:15 AM
Hi Craig

I am thinking of west coast to east coast, no city routes excluded, in the type of railcar vehicle carriers that have the perforated steel sides and ends that protect cars from vandal damage.

Steve

studeclunker
11-10-2008, 10:26 AM
An interesting idea, to be sure Steve. However, here in California it costs twelve hundred dollars to spot a railcar. Then one has to load it, which requires specialized equipment, and to the opposite on the other coast. Not to mention the transport of the vehicles to and from the loading/unloading points.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/december%2006/HPIM0234.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

Roscomacaw
11-10-2008, 11:18 AM
Maybe there's a start-up opportunity here. Conduct a small operation to move any and all types of private vehicles from east to west.;)

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

BobGlasscock
11-10-2008, 11:44 AM
I've been wondering about that for a few months, Mr. Biggs. I love driving, I love travelling, and it would be nothing but fun to meet Studebaker folks. I don't have hauling vehicles at this time, so that would be an investment. I've noticed how often it seems someone is wanting to move something somewhere, and that usually ends up costing commercial money.

I have wondered how tiny a profit would be supported by hauling stuff for club members. Gotta make more than gas money and motels. Other than that, I would be sort of happy. I have wondered how many members would that "unknown" amount per mile. And now you bring it up, so I have asked.

'50 Champion, 1 family owner
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff019.jpghttp://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff018.jpg

Chris Pile
11-10-2008, 12:25 PM
quote:Have you seen some the 'decoration' on the sides of boxcars, tankers, et al. these days? I'd be afraid a passenger car or truck riding exposed on a train would end up the same.
Craig

So wrap the Studebaker in white plastic like many of the other auto makes are doing. Simply remove it upon delivery.

Chris Pile
Midway Chapter SDC
The Studebaker Special

PackardV8
11-10-2008, 01:05 PM
FWIW, Don't even think about railroads. They will not even talk to individuals or small businesses. Their one-off costs are intentionally astronomically high to discourage these types of annoyances.

I've had friends in the business of hauling one car from one dealership to another on a roll-back-deck hauler. They charged a lot per mile and still were not making any real money. It is essentially impossible to move a car a long distance less expensively than the pros with a big rig hauler who are competing every day against each other on bids. We've all gotten by doing a favor for friends, but that isn't a business model.

Then, there is insurance, liablilty and risk. A local BrandX guy got sued by a friend who was helping him work on a car and lost everything he had. "Hey, Joe. Pour just a splash of gas in the carb." Joe poured too much, was still holding the container, there was a backfire, alight, he splashed more gas on himself, was disfigured and lost the sight in one eye. Imagine if someone delivering your car had a head-on with a family with nine children. Imagine you were the driver and found the car you were delivering was uninsured.

There ain't no easy money nor inexpensive way to move old arn around the country. Yes, it costs more than it formerly did, so speculating in old cars is less profitable, but it is still a relative bargain if it is the Stude of your dreams.

thnx, jack vines

PlainBrownR2
11-10-2008, 04:44 PM
quote:
From what point to what point? I'd be concerned about which big cities the main rail line runs through. They always seem to go through some of the roughest and dangerous areas of town. Have you seen some the 'decoration' on the sides of boxcars, tankers, et al. these days? I'd be afraid a passenger car or truck riding exposed on a train would end up the same.


I would also like to point out most to all railroads ship vehicles by enclosed autorack. The large car with the perforated sides and the top came about due to this very reason, security. With the open autorack, it left the commodity exposed to the outside world, and became a target for vandals. So they began outfitting them with sides, and later a top to protect the cargo inside. Eventually it was industry standard to have the autoracks outfitted in this fashion. While graffiti is an ever delightful topic for me(ugggghhhh), if somehow damage were to occur while in the shipper's control, the liability is to the shipper. It's also important to remember that railroads whole business is transport, and most will do it in the safest and cost effective way possible. Remember the flipside of this coin, graffiti may appear on the railcars, but it pales in comparison to the firey rollover the truck with the collectible autos just went through because someone pulled out in front of the truck on the freeway :(....

http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000145-1.jpg
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000137-1.jpg[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]
[IMG=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/Ex%20Studebaker%20Plant%20Locomotive/P1000578-1.jpg[/IMG=left]

PackardV8
11-10-2008, 05:42 PM
Obviously, that transport company needed better training and operators with priorities in order. Choice between damaging rare valuable collector cars or the unknown idiot in a car pulling in the lane? Just keep it straight and level, with the shiny side up, brothertrucker. ;>)

thnx, jack vines

PackardV8

s2d63lark
11-10-2008, 08:28 PM
Many years ago I worked for an Allied Van Lines agent in the Toronto, Ontario area. A number of our moves involved an automobile. Some were loaded into the moving van with the household goods and some were driven just north of Toronto to Concord, Ontario to a company know as T-CATT. Here they were loaded onto an Autorack railcar and shipped out. I recall vaguely that they "pooled" their deliveries and most of what we delivered to them was destined for Western Canada. I don't know what is in the U.S. as a comparable outfit but maybe a check with a National Van Line might yield some information.