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View Full Version : How to move a lot of parts??



bams50
08-20-2008, 09:47 PM
This is about the closing of C&B Studebakers in CA (see the other related threads here:

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=21490
http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=21511

I'm trying to work out a way to get more stuff from CA to NY. I thought about an out of work trucker hauling a load. One guy I know has a 53' box trailer as well. I figured around 6000 miles round-trip, 10 MPG equals 600 gallons. Figuring $5/gallon, that's 3 grand, not counting his cost:( No idea what he'd want, say a grand. That's 4 grand before Bob sells me anything, or anyone loads it[xx(] Maybe if it was a full load of NOS r2s or something[}:)]

Still... it's not my style to think something's impossible. So I'm wondering- anyone got any ideas? I've got acres of protected, licensed land here. I'm not trying to become a vendor, but a safe haven. I don't know what I'm trying to do- I just know there's a ton of really important parts that are on the verge of disappearing, never to be replaced again. There's gotta be a solution to that.

So I'm thinking brainstorm session. Realistically there's probably no way to make it work. But it's worth thinking about. I'm not going to get an ulcer from the stuff heading to the grave, but I'll do what I can to prevent that...

This may be just a dead-end discussion- a fun mental exercise; what do you think?

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"It was the last chance for Studebaker to turn things around. The company was down to its last bullet, and this new small car was it. They called it the Lark"

mbstude
08-20-2008, 09:50 PM
StudeDave is part owner of that bread truck. And he IS retired... ;)

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, GA
http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk179/1959S2D/andy-1.jpg

Studeman
08-20-2008, 10:27 PM
Check into RAIL... maybe getting a trailer(tractor). filling it and loading it on a flatbed.

Ray

http://www.ncsdc.com/TEMP/azavatar.gif
Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

wcarroll@outrageous.net
08-20-2008, 10:49 PM
You might also look into actually shipping them. Years ago, I was surprised to find out it was cheaper to ship cars from the US to Europe than it was to truck them across the states!!! Just a thought...

http://community.webshots.com/user/s2dbaker?vhost=community

Dick Steinkamp
08-20-2008, 10:58 PM
quote:Originally posted by bams50

This is about the closing of C&B Studebakers in CA



Keep in mind that Bob isn't CLOSING. He will be in biz for some time to come. He has an enclosed facility of maybe 2,000 sq ft or so in Hayward a few miles from his storage yard. He also can keep 5-6 cars in the shared parking lot. He can't keep a lot of sheet metal or frames or other big stuff there, however, and that's what needs to be cleared out of the storage yard he is loosing soon.

How about this idea...

Ian is coming over from Australia to go with Bob to Lancaster. At this point they are planning to drive Bob's pick up pulling a standard car trailer loaded with parts. I would think if Bob got a BIG order, he might be talked into renting a U-Haul truck (or two since Ian could also drive one). Maybe some sort of cost sharing on the trip would be possible. Bob is a good businessman...as you are bams...I'll bet you guys could work something out that is mutually beneficial.

Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/Stude-a-mino%20old%20pics/oldpics6asmall.jpg

gordr
08-20-2008, 11:15 PM
Buy a used 53-foot Sea Can, stuff it full of parts, and ship that.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Swifster
08-20-2008, 11:44 PM
quote:Originally posted by mbstude

StudeDave is part owner of that bread truck. And he IS retired... ;)


I'd ask if he was a tail gunner on that bread truck, but then I know he doesn't live in Detroit...

Bob, what about PODS. They advertise a lot. It may not hold a frame, but probably would hold just about anything else. I think their containers are 4X6

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Mulberry, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/04-11-08CoolingFan.jpg

wolfie
08-20-2008, 11:52 PM
The PODS people here had many sizes of containers.Some may have been shipping cans but they offered up a 30 or 35 footer a couple years ago when we were flea marketing a lot.Price was very reasonable but they were delivering it and we would have rented it monthly rather than loading it and hauling it.Might be worth looking in to.Steve

bob40
08-20-2008, 11:58 PM
Get on the horn to a west coast used car/truck dealer.
Using your connections (and license) as a car dealership
buy a 28 ft diesel straight truck at dealer auction.
Fill truck...if well packed they can hold a LOT of stuff.
Drive truck to east coast.
unload truck of parts,sell truck at auction,claim entire
operation as a business expense.

Warren Webb
08-21-2008, 12:06 AM
I used to deal with a guy that was in the Mercedes parts business. He would have a container of parts shipped from Europe direct to Los Angeles & was able to sell below wholesale & did a heck of a business. The container thing may be the way to go & either keep the container for storage or sell it when done.

60 Lark convertible
61 Champ
62 Daytona convertible
63 G.T. R-2,4 speed
63 Avanti (2)
66 Daytona Sport Sedan

58PackardWagon
08-21-2008, 12:45 AM
BAM, I manage a transportation company. Just a few questions. Do you know aprox. weight for all of the goods? With the premise that you will be filling a 53 foot trailer. Also when the goods arrive at your place do you need cover for them, will they be sitting outside or you have indoor storage for them. What type of transit time are you looking for? slow or super slow? Will you be loading and unloading? Also please advise origin and destination zip codes and I will do my best to assist.

58 Packard Wgn (Parade Red)
58 Packard Wgn (Park Green)
58 Packard Sdn (Shadowtone Red)
62 Daytona (White)
63 R2 Lark (Super Red)
57 Packard Wagon parts car
57 Packard sedan parts car
58 Packard 2 dr hdtp parts car

wcarroll@outrageous.net
08-21-2008, 12:47 AM
You don't necessarily have to buy a container -they are usually provided and dropped on site for you to fill. Then they are picked up by truck and delivered to port for loading onto ship. Services like this are often used by people moving between the mainland and Hawaii.

http://community.webshots.com/user/s2dbaker?vhost=community

bams50
08-21-2008, 05:20 AM
Hey, this has been kind of fun...

A few answers:

Rail- haven't looked at that yet.

Shipping- too much labor individually shipping pieces

Dick S.- I know Bob isn't closing, but he IS going to be very limited for space. Schedule would be a question, since I wouldn't have money to put into a crazy idea like this before Lancaster

Sea Can- I assume that's one of those containers used on big ships? Cool idea, since the items would arrive with their own storage.

PODS- A great idea! Cost would be the key, but depending on the makeup of the load, might be feasible.



Bob40- I thought about that; but it would be tought to find a truck and put fuel in and make it feasible; that's why I thought it would have to be a bigger truck. You could carry a lot more in a 53 footer than a 28, for about the same fuel/time cost.

58- Great to know what you do! I haven't gotten anywhere near knowing what the specific makeup of a load would be yet, let alone guessing at weights. For storage, I have some inside and some out. Shipping time isn't an issue. For discussion I'm thinking Bob loads there and I unload here.

There are plenty of other hurdles, starting with what exactly would make up the load. Then there would be the issue of cost for the items, and if Bob would even want to mess with a scheme like this. I haven't talked to him about it, because at this point it's just an exercise. But what got me thinking is knowing that Bob is a businessman, but also a Stude guy. I'm betting he'd make a REALLY good package deal in the interest of saving the stuff from destruction.

Then comes the issue of what to do once the stuff got here... I'm not going to use all that stuff myself, so what would be the marketability of it? I'd put a lot of money and effort, and TIME into this; I'd have to think logically about how to disperse the stuff to those who need it, without losing my shirt. I've heard plenty about CASOs...

Great participation, all! Let's keep playing with the concept. Fun? Yes. Possible?

Anything's possible;)

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"It was the last chance for Studebaker to turn things around. The company was down to its last bullet, and this new small car was it. They called it the Lark"

N8N
08-21-2008, 09:43 AM
you could also look into the original PODS - a sea box. I wonder if it might not be cheaper to load up a sea box and have it shipped. I know that decomissioned ones are dirt cheap - we rent them for job site storage for something like $75/mo. according to one of the sprinkler guys. maybe you could have it shipped by rail or something - most any mode of transport is set up to handle them (container ship, semi truck, rail, etc.)

If you bought the box outright you could just have it delivered to your property and you wouldn't even have to unload it. I have no idea what that would cost however.

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
http://members.cox.net/njnagel

Dick Steinkamp
08-21-2008, 09:45 AM
quote:Originally posted by bams50
so what would be the marketability of it? I'd put a lot of money and effort, and TIME into this; I'd have to think logically about how to disperse the stuff to those who need it, without losing my shirt. I've heard plenty about CASOs...



Probably not great, unfortunately. Peterson is having trouble putting a load together of presold stuff with FREE freight at pretty sharp prices. He's been advertising in TW for several months now.

I think CASO has something to do with it, but it could also be that there just aren't THAT many Studebakers undergoing the type of restoration that would require the owner to purchase nice, rust free parts.

At an International Meet, there are maybe 400 cars there? From the ones I've been to, I'd say half of them (maybe less) are actual concours restorations. The rest are nice, and fun to look at, but don't have the time and effort and skill level put into them that would require hunting down some good sheet metal to start with. So 200 cars that are done top notch. Maybe that's 1/4 of all the top notch Studebakers around. Maybe there are 1,000 total top notch Studes in existence? It that's the case, I'd say there are far less than that number of "top notch" cars under construction at any point in time. Maybe a couple of hundred. Of those, the smart builders have already started with a relatively straight and rust free example. Maybe 50-100 Studes being built that NEED nice, original rust free parts. That's all years, all models...trucks, cars. Not a big market.

Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/Stude-a-mino%20old%20pics/oldpics6asmall.jpg

4961Studebaker
08-21-2008, 10:16 AM
I received a quote for 150 a ccab door plus 100 for a trunk lid.

Chop Stu
http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q14/kkad0711/IMG_5406-1.jpg

Swifster
08-21-2008, 10:20 AM
Dick, you also need to keep in mind that news parts are cheap and plentiful in many cases. Now if I have the extra cash right now, I'd see about a complete dog house for the Commander, but the sheetmetal for this is close to $500 for all new parts.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Mulberry, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/04-11-08CoolingFan.jpg

studegary
08-21-2008, 02:53 PM
I like your thought, Bob, but I think that it would only make sense for someone in CA or close by, like in the NV desert. The transport cost to the east coast is too much (the same situation as for shipping low cost vehicles across the country).

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

bams50
08-21-2008, 04:42 PM
You're probably right, Dick. I don't see myself "vending", as in having a booth at shows, or advertising parts for sale; that's not realistic for me. I guess I'm thinking of being more like a clearing house- getting the stuff East in one shipment, for two reasons: To save stuff that has to move or die, and to do so more efficiently, therefore cheaper.

As I'm thinking and reading the comments, I'm starting to picture a different approach: going with a smaller container of some kind, like a POD. Maybe narrowing it to my main interest, which is Lark stuff; and supplementing it with a few of the more important pieces. Maybe someone out here would go in with me to get some stuff they want.

I talked to PODS today, and here's their info: You rent the container for a month, starting on the day they drop it at the location. Transit time from CA to NY is 9 days; that leaves 21 days to load, and unload at the end. Beyond that, you pay $199/month till it's ready for pickup. The container is 8' wide by 8' high by 16' long. Total cost: $4,205.28. And, they frown on engines, or anything with fluids.

That would hold a lot of stuff; but it would have to, to justify the cost. Clearly, the load would need to be mostly valuable things; my thought of that Daytona shell filled and surrounded by doors, etc. would be tough to justify, even if the stuff was free[xx(]

So I'm still thinking, and looking for ideas; in the meantime, everybody should be calling Bob for the FREE SHIPPING TO LANCASTER!!

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"It was the last chance for Studebaker to turn things around. The company was down to its last bullet, and this new small car was it. They called it the Lark"

Swifster
08-21-2008, 07:45 PM
quote:Originally posted by bams50

Total cost: $4,205.28. And, they frown on engines, or anything with fluids.



[:0]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Mulberry, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/04-11-08CoolingFan.jpg

PlainBrownR2
08-21-2008, 08:23 PM
Regarding the container or Sea Cans(presuming thats one of many names on those things), thats the beauty of the intermodal system. The containers are standardized so they can be stacked and unloaded from the ship at an originating terminal, dropped onto a truck frame destined for the shipyard or a waiting intermodal railcar, transported to their destination, and then unloaded onto another ship or truck trailer frame that is in a distant terminal across the country. I know one of our club members had to ship two cars from S. Africa this way. They arrived at a Chicago terminal from a S. African terminal by boat. The hitch though is they had to go to the terminal to find and open the container to get their possessions out of it. They didn't ship directly to their house.

http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000145-1.jpg
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000137-1.jpg[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]
[IMG=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/Ex%20Studebaker%20Plant%20Locomotive/P1000578-1.jpg[/IMG=left]

N8N
08-21-2008, 08:43 PM
yup, and from what I hear there's a glut of them because a lot of them are made in China to ship Chinese goods over here, and the Chinese can make a new one for less than the cost of shipping an empty one back.

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
http://members.cox.net/njnagel

bams50
08-21-2008, 08:59 PM
Hmm.....

Anyone know how to find out about these cans and where they're available??

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"It was the last chance for Studebaker to turn things around. The company was down to its last bullet, and this new small car was it. They called it the Lark"

Dick Steinkamp
08-21-2008, 09:24 PM
quote:Originally posted by N8N

yup, and from what I hear there's a glut of them because a lot of them are made in China to ship Chinese goods over here, and the Chinese can make a new one for less than the cost of shipping an empty one back.



Sounds like an urban legend. The boat has to go back to China for more stuff for us no matter if we have exports for them or not. Seems like loading empty cans would be better than leaving them here.



Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/Stude-a-mino%20old%20pics/oldpics6asmall.jpg

StudeDave57
08-21-2008, 09:32 PM
quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp


quote:Originally posted by N8N

yup, and from what I hear there's a glut of them because a lot of them are made in China to ship Chinese goods over here, and the Chinese can make a new one for less than the cost of shipping an empty one back.
Sounds like an urban legend. The boat has to go back to China for more stuff for us no matter if we have exports for them or not. Seems like loading empty cans would be better than leaving them here. Dick Steinkamp

They go back filled with all the scrap metal they can hold~ or some other useful raw material they can use to to make something for almost nothing...

StudeDave '57 [8D]

Dick Steinkamp
08-22-2008, 09:54 AM
quote:Originally posted by StudeDave57
They go back filled with all the scrap metal they can hold~ or some other useful raw material they can use to to make something for almost nothing...




In one of my life's I had a customer that was THE scrap steel shipper in the Bay Area. Two of their yards were located at San Francisco Bay ports. The ships would dock there and be filled by using huge magnets on cranes, dumping the scrap into the hold. They would actually put a small dozer in the hold to spread out the scrap.

Even at today's high scrap prices, I can't see rationalizing the labor needed to load ocean containers with something with that low of a value. Have you actually seen this done?

As long as I have been in logistics (20+ years), there has always been an imbalance in ocean containers with a lot of empties being returned to Asia. BTW, this "no revenue leg" is baked into the inbound transport for our imports.

Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/Stude-a-mino%20old%20pics/oldpics6asmall.jpg

StudeDave57
08-22-2008, 12:43 PM
quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp


quote:Originally posted by StudeDave57
They go back filled with all the scrap metal they can hold~ or some other useful raw material they can use to to make something for almost nothing...
Have you actually seen this done? Dick
Maybe I should have had the word "maybe" in front of that line? I'd think they must go back with some sort of raw material to make something out of, though. They can't ALL go back to Asia empty. The comment about scrap metal was just speculation.

StudeDave '57 [8D]

kurtruk
08-23-2008, 02:10 PM
Bams50: Have you looked into ABF? They drop a trailer, you load it, they pick it up and drive it to your destination. Becoming popular move yourself technique for folks moving around the country.

KURTRUK
(read it backwards)


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3267/2617723594_889afb71cf_t.jpg http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2412/2267352617_720245049a_m.jpg http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3286/2679715309_563ea85e42_m.jpg

BobGlasscock
08-23-2008, 02:28 PM
A ship loaded with empty cans would get less gas mileage than an empty one, so it just wouldn't pay to take empties back. Some certainly get back and forth, but there is still the trade deficit to deal with. An 'information segment' (I guess) during the Olympics on NBC covered the increasing cost of scrap metal to Chinese industry and how they can't afford it anymore. Really? Studebaker values just increased. They are also looking for cheaper labor in southeast Asia. Where have we seen this in the big picture before? Karma.

'50 Champion, 1 family owner
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff019.jpghttp://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff018.jpg

bams50
08-23-2008, 02:43 PM
Never heard of them, Kurtruk. Any other info?

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

63larkcustom
08-23-2008, 03:13 PM
This is the ABF website for upack shipping.
http://www.upack.com/Default.asp?bhcp=1

Guido
08-23-2008, 07:38 PM
A friend of mine owns a upack franchise. It is set up for the do it yourself mover.

Sea containers are for sale all the time. Last time I checked, you can expect to pay $1400 - $1700 for a used 40' one, just a couple of hundred less for a 20' one. They can be found on e-Bay as well as Craigslist. It will take a Landoll trailer to move it.

I looked into buying one to store my horse drawn vehicles in. Actually 2 would be better, set them 16' apart and attach trusses to the top and wall in the space at the back and add doors to the front. Seems like a cheap way to make a storage building.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

bams50
08-23-2008, 10:00 PM
Just looked at ABF. Their quote for a 20' unit from there to here is $3110.

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

gordr
08-23-2008, 10:10 PM
Bob, I see empty cans going back all the time on the rail line near town here.

Ships' fuel consumption has very little to do with the weight of the cargo. Anyway, if they don't carry a load back, they have to take on ballast, because they are designed to operate with X amount of the hull in the water. Too light, and they could come to grief in a storm.

I think the sea cans that are being sold off are old ones that are "miled out" or which no longer meet the specs for sea transport.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Guido
08-23-2008, 10:13 PM
quote:Originally posted by gordr

Bob, I see empty cans going back all the time on the rail line near town here.
Are they shipping containers or containers used for garbage transport? We see a lot of out of state garbage moved via rail in containers that look similar to the ones for sea.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

bams50
08-23-2008, 10:18 PM
On Guido's suggestion I checked eBay for containers; there are plenty, like 40 footers from $1500 to $3500, and all over the country. Of course, that doesn't include transport...

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

wolfie
08-23-2008, 10:35 PM
40' cans here are available for around 1500-2000 with free delivery within a 50 mile radius usually.When dad was still with us he sold classic motorcycles and parts to guys from England and Germany that would buy these "cans" and ship their stuff back in them.That was in the early 90's and they could buy one for less than return shipping then.They have about doubled in price now but I would guess shipping has also.I feel certain you could find one around NYC or Jersey and would believe you can find them in the yellow pages in most larger cities.Steve

PlainBrownR2
08-24-2008, 12:01 AM
To provide an example of a garbage train, and some of you will probably recognize it right away, this is a train with garbage cars:


http://www.capecodrails.com/ds/bclr/ds_bclr1751trashhoxie.jpg

In the days of old essentially they were modified boxcars for garbage shipments. According to this line, these cars are loaded with solid waste for garbage to energy power plants. Apparently they have come a ways as they do use intermodal equipment to haul trash:


http://www.robl.w1.com/im-bk/IM-10.htm


These are the containers I'm thinking of. Far as I know when they travel odds are, something is in it:


http://www.trainweb.org/KernJunction/bnsf/04300324.jpg


I dunno how many of them are empty when shipped, but I know the product has been delivered(or awaiting to be received) when they look like this:


http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=52147


As far as what happens to the containers, well here they may end up getting used for something else, transport or none. I know a few of the guys I know that did just that, buy a couple of containers to use as a garage, sheds, or storing other materials. They also get stored in massive stacks in intermodal yards around the Chicago area. Take a walk through one of those, it's mindblowing the number of empty containers stacked like empty boxes, and somewhat freaky at the same time.


http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000145-1.jpg
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000137-1.jpg[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]
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