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View Full Version : Why do the Studebaker gods....



Lou Van Anne
11-28-2018, 06:42 PM
...hate me? :confused:

It seems that I can't go 50 miles without something breaking, leaking, dying or falling off my '64 GT Hawk....it has been one thing after another ever since I got her....:mad: I'm beginning to wonder if I'll ever get my "problem child" to behave....

Last week it was a leaking power steering system. Today, after replacing a leaking water pump I discover a leaking brake cyl.....

I never had a Studebaker that was more contrary than this one....:o

Will the sun come in the morning?....:confused:

StudeRich
11-28-2018, 07:24 PM
I believe it is ALL about how Good a Car you buy, I HOPE it was a pretty Cheap purchase! :eek:

Sometimes you get exactly WHAT you paid for.

Other times you just get what someone else knows or SHOULD know, is JUNK!

I have a rule: before making a Stude. a Daily Driver or even close to that, to just REPLACE Everything that can Leak, Squeak or Wear out, due to being over 50 years old.
This saves a LOT of grief, if you cannot afford to or will not do that, then yes you ARE Hurting and calling a Tow Truck quite a bit. :(

tsenecal
11-28-2018, 09:10 PM
Sorry to hear that you have a problem child, But I think that the sun WILL come up tomorrow, and each problem that you deal with, will eventually make it a dependable driver. Until then, you had better keep your test drives close to home, and your tool box in the trunk. Good luck with her.

Milaca
11-28-2018, 09:20 PM
At least you have a beautiful car.
I would be happy to do you a favor and trade you my very dependable 1963 GT Hawk even-up for it! The engine could use a rebuilding and it could use a repaint, but the car has never let me down in the 11 years that I have owned it!

studegary
11-28-2018, 09:20 PM
It looks like you did not give the Hawk a complete mechanical check-up when you first got it or at the beginning of this driving season. Some things just happen, but many can be prevented or at least taken care of before driving. The leaking brake cylinder is the one that most concerns me. Completely check out the brake system (cylinders, lines, hoses). Going is one thing, but stopping is much more important.

Lou Van Anne
11-28-2018, 09:38 PM
Thanks for you words of encouragement....I'm not giving up....maybe my wallet will....why not bring your Hawk to our 18th All Studebaker picnic here in Stockton April 27th 2019.....it only a 357 miles!....love to see her!
Sorry to hear that you have a problem child, But I think that the sun WILL come up tomorrow, and each problem that you deal with, will eventually make it a dependable driver. Until then, you had better keep your test drives close to home, and your tool box in the trunk. Good luck with her.

TWChamp
11-28-2018, 10:45 PM
I wish I had an old rusty Studebaker to drive in the winter, so I wouldn't have to feel bad about driving it in the road salt.
My modern car has been down quite a bit lately. Now my 2 year old Spectra fuel pump isn't working on my 1999 Olds.
Someone told me to buy a Delphi pump, not Spectra, so I guess this is proof they knew what they were talking about.

kmul221
11-29-2018, 10:39 AM
The previous owner assured me my 63 didn't leak, when it arrived I dscovered all the fluids had already leaked out so no more to leak !

thunderations
11-29-2018, 11:43 AM
You can spend the vast amount of time and money to completely restore your vehicle and on the day you put on that last shiny part and stand back to look at the finished project, what you are really doing going into the maintenance mood and wondering what part will fail first.
Hopefully you will get these glitches sorted out and have a wondrous 2019 enjoying your car.
Just keep in mind, it is a 55 year old machine using pre WWII technology and parts from the lowest priced vendor.

studeclunker
11-29-2018, 06:53 PM
Well Ken, I would say that's Post-WWII with a Hawk. Believe me, that's a big difference!77261

Poor Lou. Perhaps you should paint the old bird yellow? Sorry to hear about your issues. Eventually you will have replaced most, if not all, the moving parts with quality replacements, and the car should run better than new. Um... sorry, I don't suppose that was much more encouraging than Gary's post... was it?77262 I can sympathise having had two Champs ('60 & '62 Wilbur and Ed respectively) that were the same way. The one is in pieces in the yard and the older was traded to a friend who is working out the idiosyncrasies of it bit by bit. The upside of it is that Wilbur is toddling on down the road looking and sounding like a Studebaker Champ should. So 50/50 good news I suppose. Maybe there's hope for the Hawk after all eh?

Lou Van Anne
11-29-2018, 07:23 PM
I keep looking for that "light at the end of the tunnel"......it's gotten to be a damn expensive tunnel!

swvalcon
11-29-2018, 07:54 PM
You know what they say Just like a Harley if your Studebakers isn't marking its spot it's out of fluids.

firestoper 25
11-29-2018, 07:59 PM
I keep looking for that "light at the end of the tunnel"......it's gotten to be a damn expensive tunnel!

I had a run in with the light at the end of the tunnel once, it was the flame of a cruise missile! The auto in the tunnel that the missile hit was a 79 six cylinder Mustang that belonged to my sister-in-law......the world is better off without that darn auto. Carry on with the Studebaker, look at it as a test of will power. Every time I lift the hood or crawl under/over my Avanti I see it as a rescue mission,the auto rescues dollars from my saving account and redistributes them to the U.S. economy. welcome to my world, my job here is done. Sherm/Green Bay with the 1st snow of the season.:yeahright:

64Avanti
11-29-2018, 09:48 PM
...hate me? :confused:

It seems that I can't go 50 miles without something breaking, leaking, dying or falling off my '64 GT Hawk....it has been one thing after another ever since I got her....:mad: I'm beginning to wonder if I'll ever get my "problem child" to behave....

Last week it was a leaking power steering system. Today, after replacing a leaking water pump I discover a leaking brake cyl.....

I never had a Studebaker that was more contrary than this one....:o

Will the sun come in the morning?....:confused:

I have a solution... I will come pick it up and take it off of your hands. I won't even charge you. I am in the bay area so it isn't a problem!

T.J. lavallee
11-30-2018, 11:39 AM
Seal and gaskets don't weather time on older cars. The more dependable materials used today were not present at the time our cars were built. I've always replaced gaskets and seals on older cars and motorcycles as a precaution. Time spent doing this yields more carefree time on the road. Looks like garage time is inevitable in your future for the time being. Be safe and best of luck.

Lou Van Anne
11-30-2018, 03:27 PM
One more problem and you might have a deal......
I have a solution... I will come pick it up and take it off of your hands. I won't even charge you. I am in the bay area so it isn't a problem!

jclary
11-30-2018, 05:31 PM
This has been a pretty entertaining conversation. Proof, once again, that while we may occasionally finish a long-running restoration project...they are truly never ever really finished. Even before our large family got their first car (a 1950 Pontiac Station Wagon in 1953), I recall overhearing adults who had new cars talking about having to take their new cars back to have things adjusted and repaired. Then, when I bought my first new car, the turn signal module in my 1971 Super Beetle VW had to be replaced the first month.

So, here we are over a half century later, complaining about having to tinker, tweak, and fiddle with our vintage cars. For reasons I won't bore you with now, I didn't get to play with my Studebakers much this past summer. Now the holiday season is upon us. I always try to get some special Studebaker local highway exposure during the holidays. So I have pulled my trusty 1955 E5 truck from the barn, dusted it off, changed the oil, and gave all the grease fittings a little shot of lube. Only to discover a new oil leak coming from the fuel pump to block gasket.:(

It's cold weather now, and I have no heated garage. My fingers are developing arthritis, and my back is not what it used to be. So, I'm hoping to get a warmer dry day to do the job. While I'm using my infirmities as an excuse to delay actually doing the repair...I'm trying to think of the easiest way to approach the job. Do I put a fender protector over the fender, lean in from the top to remove the pump?...or do I crawl under the truck and try to do it from underneath? Then, there's the issue of a full gas tank. On the trucks, if you remove the flex fuel line from the pump with a full tank, lots of gas will come rushing out. So now I gotta either siphon out some of the gas or come up with a quick cap for a flared line fitting.:confused:

Lots of little things to consider even when doing some pretty simple tasks. So...the key is...ATTITUDE!:whome: I could work myself into a bitter complaining self-pity-party:QQ::mad:... Or, take each step as a challenge to problem solve, overcome each difficulty, and have pride in accomplishing the tasks and enjoy the results.:!: Then...take a few moments to meditate and give a prayer of thanks that I retain enough physical ability to do such things,:) even if I'm no longer as young, flexible, and pain-free as I once was.;)

I have more than one hobby. One is die-cast cars. That is a somewhat static "collector" hobby. For me, having my vintage cars is a "participation" hobby.:) If I didn't enjoy participating in keeping them running, then to me, they would be just a collection of old used cars prone to breakdowns.:QQ: