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chet445
08-06-2018, 07:39 AM
On the 289 engine where you fill the crankcase on the forward part of the engine instead of valve cover fill openings, was there a PCV in the valley cover or did a pipe go directly over the side at rear of engine? Did that engine have valve covers that had no openings for a cap? chet445

64studeavanti
08-06-2018, 08:44 AM
Some 62s did have PCV. Anything older would have draft tube. 63 and 64 engines would have PCV and caps on valve covers.

DEEPNHOCK
08-06-2018, 09:48 AM
PCV history started in the early 60's.
Several companies made different "Open" designs, so there is not just one style that was used on Studebakers.

An "open" pcv system bled the crankcase fumes into the intake manifold via the PCV valve.
The 'fresh' outside aire came though the valve cover breather.

A "closed" pcv system (used on all later cars & trucks) had the clean air inlet in the air cleaner, usually with a separate filter pad to keep the fresh air to the crankcase filtered.
"Closed" pcv systems do not have open breather caps (like Stude used).

chet445
08-06-2018, 10:42 AM
I must have a "mixed" system. I placed a PCV valve between the valley cover that had a 3/8" tube and base of carb. Drove for about 3 miles, opened the hood and found the fill pipe at front of engine blew oil everywhere. Not too happy with having to clean up the mess. Valve covers have no caps. I intend to place a valley cover with a draft tube and maybe that will solve the problem.

Warren Webb
08-06-2018, 11:57 AM
I must have a "mixed" system. I placed a PCV valve between the valley cover that had a 3/8" tube and base of carb. Drove for about 3 miles, opened the hood and found the fill pipe at front of engine blew oil everywhere. Not too happy with having to clean up the mess. Valve covers have no caps. I intend to place a valley cover with a draft tube and maybe that will solve the problem.

Do a compression test. Sounds like you have blowby probably caused by worn rings. On one of my trucks the prior owner had placed a spring wire that pivots over the breather cap to hold it on. Otherwise it runs just fine so fixing it is not high on my "to-do" list.

bensherb
08-06-2018, 01:42 PM
If you have a lot of blow by it will make a mess if you have "breather" caps, regarless of the PCV. At high manifold vacuum as in idling or low RPM the blow by will be picked up by the PCV. But at high RPM the vacuum drops off and blow by / crankcase is vented through the breather cap. A closed cap with a hose venting into the carb side of the air filter, usually through its own filter, takes over for the PCV at high RPM when vacuum drops and airflow through the carb increases.

Jerry Forrester
08-06-2018, 06:36 PM
I must have a "mixed" system. I placed a PCV valve between the valley cover that had a 3/8" tube and base of carb. Drove for about 3 miles, opened the hood and found the fill pipe at front of engine blew oil everywhere. Not too happy with having to clean up the mess. Valve covers have no caps. I intend to place a valley cover with a draft tube and maybe that will solve the problem.

Sounds like you hooked the valve backwards.

chet445
08-06-2018, 07:35 PM
Jerry the PCV valve was put on correctly as I am aware not to put it on backwards. I know there had to be a lot of pressure in the valley. I'm now going to put on a breather tube and see what comes of it. Everything on this car has been a headache; you name it and I have had to redo mess after mess. The wiring harness was in a box all apart, doors wore out internally, heat and defroster removed...Car sure looked nice when I bought it. One positive, it came with new brake system to be installed and 5 new tires!!

chet445
08-07-2018, 08:39 AM
Tried to put the breather tube on this '62 Hawk and can't funnel it between the firewall and engine. Just another hurdle in trying to put this nice vehicle on the road. Thoughts on installing the tube would be appreciated.

mapman
08-07-2018, 09:25 AM
If it is a full flow engine without pvc it would have a unique road draft tube that weaves around the oil filter.
Rob

Harryhawk
08-08-2018, 04:31 AM
Hi chet445 first time on the forum I'm from Melbourne Australia. Had same issue with having to install a engine breather pipe on my right hand drive 62 GT Hardtop. I thought I my have to pull the engine to fit it but not the case, I removed some of the hardware (coil, distributor cap, heater hoses cables and anything I thought may get in the way) and rotating the distributor/vacuum advance out of the way to make it more accessible. It's been a while since I did this so not sure if I poked the pipe up from underneath or started from above on the right hand side of the car and pushed it over and down the contours of the bell housing, either way it worked, I had new transmission mounts so it gave me plenty of space between the firewall and engine plus the bracket at the end of the breather pipe that mounts to the bottom of the bell housing was not attached to the breather giving me more leverage/jiggle space.Don't forget the gasket/oring when bolting breather to Valley cover. Don't be discouraged in any way it's great fun and keeps our brains ticking over. Cheers Harryhawk

chet445
08-08-2018, 07:32 AM
Thanks Harryhawk I came to the conclusion that I might just try what you described. Hoping...

altair
08-08-2018, 12:17 PM
I installed a 259 V8 in my 54 sedan and I had to heat the draft tube red and slightly bend it to fit, it fits nicely with a couple of tweaks and repaint, it looks factory. I am not a proponent of PVC too many potential issues I virtually destroyed an engine with a non-functioning PVC system. These engines were designed with draft tubes but however in California some environmentalist noticed fumes coming from a draft tube and walla the PVC was introduced there. The PVC system was used much earlier than in California, stationary and enclosed engines had the systems installed because of necessity not for better performance. Some early military tanks had 5 flat head Dodge engines (that look just like Studebakers) and because they were enclosed the crankcase exhaust had to redirected back into the carburetor. There was also a fleet of concrete trucks that all had stationary flat head engines that had the crankcase exhaust redirected in to the carburetor, also with marine engines and a host of other stationary units. This didn't make them run any better rebreathing crankcase exhaust but it was a necessity. So doff the PVC and go with the draft tube. The usual filter is in the breather caps and requires to be cleaned from time to time, some air cleaners and filter caps are fitted with a nipple for a rubber pipe for added filtration, the air inlet is filtered through the air cleaner. At high speed and low vacuum the draft tube is at optimum, but not so much at low speed.

chet445
08-09-2018, 04:35 PM
Well the draft tube is in!! I cut off about a foot of the bottom part of tube and replaced that with a reinforced rubber hose. The draft tube as it was would not get past the firewall and engine with the crooks and turns it had. What a job. It is anchored to the bell housing just as the metal tube would have been. Whew. This car has had so many problems and jinks I can not believe I'm still trying to get it going. The latest was the dip stick top fell off; I was able to fish out the dip stick before it disappeared. Wonder what is next. Maybe the car wants a rest and is saying leave me alone.

Harryhawk
08-09-2018, 07:02 PM
Hi chet445 thats good news you got the tube in with a little modification, hope that solves the problem. My I suggest a couple of things that you may have already thought of. 1. You should retain the 45 degree bevel at the bottom of the tube with the opening facing the front of the car because this assists the ventilation by causing a draft when the car is in motion. 2. Check the rubber hose every now and then, because of the heat and oil down there it may soften and close. Cheer Harryhawk