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jclary
10-24-2017, 10:05 PM
The ā€˜62 Hawk was given to me out of a junkyard over 35 years ago. The rusty NY License plate explained all the rust and bondo. The original 289 engine was long gone and the 259 replacement was a good indicator that the poor Hawk had a rough existence.

I kept the engine and some other parts and sold the rest. Today I removed the Delco distributor to use in another engine. This is what I found.
68026 All the black gunk above the gear is a gooey buildup of greasy gunk. Makes me wonder if the owner ever changed the oil.

drrotor
10-24-2017, 11:15 PM
Yesterday my wife and I were walking through a parking lot where we saw a nearly-new, Iā€™d say maybe 2 year old Chrysler. I should have taken a picture but the owner was sitting in it. There was not one straight panel on it. Windshield broken. Headlight duct-taped in place. Only one hubcap left. Tires curb-scrubbed. Interior piled full of garbage. Bumper covers torn and dangling loose. What in the world? How do you so thoroughly destroy a car in only that much time?
Sounds like your poor Hawk suffered a similar fate...

Alan
10-24-2017, 11:18 PM
That looks like a lot of engines I saw back in the late 50's, while working at a Signal Oil Station. One guy came in with a Buick straight 8 that was making a lot of lifter noise and wanted the valves adjusted. The top of the engine had a quarter inch of shinny goo on it. I asked him if he ever changed the oil and he said. "Every 3,000 miles and with 40 weight Penzoil.

showbizkid
10-25-2017, 12:36 PM
How do you so thoroughly destroy a car in only that much time?

Here in SoCal, this is a common sight. Homeless people buy wrecked cars out of the junkyard with a salvage title, then live in them. As long as it moves under its own power, they can change locations every other day and avoid being cited. This sounds like what you're describing.

jclary
10-25-2017, 01:38 PM
As a little follow-up, this morning, I went back to that engine with the intent to rob the oil dip stick assembly. I removed the entire assembly, tube with the dipstick. This one is longer than the ones in the older engines with a bracket that attaches to the exhaust manifold. Although the stick & tube are longer, it still reads "5 quarts full." When I get a chance, I will see if I can check the markings from the tip of the dipsticks just to compare where the markings fall. Not that it would provide any insight.


On another thread, I had mentioned that I had other dipsticks that read 6 quarts on the stick. On that thread, some posters stated that the capacities had changed in 1955. But today, I checked another spare (53 or 54) 232 car V8 and found that the dipstick reads "5 quarts full.":confused: If I was not so lazy, I would get into the catalogs, compare numbers, and find the answers.:rolleyes: Of course, if we all did that, we would all probably quit posting so much and have to use the time to actually work on our projects.:whome:;)

RadioRoy
10-25-2017, 02:39 PM
If I was not so lazy, I would get into the catalogs, compare numbers, and find the answers.:rolleyes: Of course, if we all did that, we would all probably quit posting so much and have to use the time to actually work on our projects.:whome:;)

I know you are kidding, but that is certainly in line with the majority of newbie forum posters in that respect. Why get the correct answer from the book when someone can ask an often incomplete, information challenged question and get all sorts of speculative answers? :)

Jeffry Cassel
10-26-2017, 12:39 PM
Reminds me of my wrenching youth.You didn't want to take on an overhaul of a Pennzoil motor; they were varnish city and often an inch of goo in the valley and oil pan.

jclary
10-26-2017, 03:16 PM
I know you are kidding, but that is certainly in line with the majority of newbie forum posters in that respect. Why get the correct answer from the book when someone can ask an often incomplete, information challenged question and get all sorts of speculative answers? :)

Well...I am guilty as charged, and certainly been on the forum long enough to no longer claim "NEWBIE" status.:o Instead of calling it "LAZY," I prefer to refer to it as "Cliff Notes" (a shortcut) to the information.;) Of course, any of you who have depended too much on reading a condensed "Cliff Notes" version of a great literary work before an exam, quickly learn shortcuts can get you into a heap o trouble.:( Here, on the forum, there are some who's answers I trust more than others.:yeahright:

Then there's my postings:oops:...always suspect:confused:...and (unlike the current practice of the so called main stream press) should be scrutinized, supported, and confirmed by at least three additional trusted sources.:rolleyes:

Bud
10-27-2017, 08:00 AM
My theory on Pennzoil is that is was one of the most widely used oils several decades back. Other oils of the time sludged just as bad as Pennzoil which I believe was caused by lower temperature thermostats, rich fuel mixtures, running in cold weather where the engine never got hot and the oil additive packages that were available to the refiners at the time. Time marches on and so does technology, which is why sludge no longer a big problem. Bud