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johnstonboys
10-10-2017, 09:52 PM
Howdy folks. I am in search of a good engine for my Rockne. The block cracked from not properly draining it last winter. Its a 1932 65hp engine, rumor has it that the 34-35 dictator will also work.

Thanks for any leads.
Alan in New Hampshire

tsenecal
10-10-2017, 11:04 PM
You didn't mention whether the block was cracked internally or outside. A QUALIFIED shop may be able to repair the damaged block , if it were stripped down and examined. This could be an alternative, if you are unable to find a different one.

DieselJim
10-11-2017, 08:00 AM
Don't know if it would work, but we have a 37 Dictator engine that was taken apart years ago.

Chris Pile
10-11-2017, 08:21 AM
Didn't the engine powering the Rockne eventually become Studebakers big six cylinder engine?

jclary
10-11-2017, 09:06 AM
Howdy folks. I am in search of a good engine for my Rockne. The block cracked from not properly draining it last winter. Its a 1932 65hp engine, rumor has it that the 34-35 dictator will also work.

Thanks for any leads.
Alan in New Hampshire

Thanks for posting this. It should be a warning to all.:ohmy: Although I live in a region I consider "THE EDGE OF WINTER," which is relatively mild compared to many, it does get COLD! When I was a teenager, one frosty morning I awoke to find the "freeze plugs" of the Olds engine in my A Model (hot rod) had been pushed out, and the block cracked. Back then, you could buy a gallon of anti-freeze for less than two bucks. Since I was using a marginally sufficient 32 Chevy radiator, that leaked, and blew out the coolant. With no hood, or fenders, the engine was very accessible. I had become comfortable with opening the petcock and draining the radiator and block, instead of buying anti-freeze.:rolleyes:

What I failed to realize, is that "Blocks don't necessarily drain well or complete! Don't matter who made the engine, truck, car, or tractor! Freezing water expands...something will give! LESSON LEARNED!:QQ:

Something folks who live in true WINTER know, and many rural areas have experienced welders competent in using the proper nickel alloy to weld cast iron. Here in the South, I was fortunate to know a certified Southern Railway welding instructor with the skills.

Sorry for the mishap...hope someone steps up with a solution.

56GH
10-11-2017, 09:44 AM
I once owned a 1953 Champion coupe and found that shortly after I bought it, it had a cracked block at the right rear where it was hard to see. I pulled the engine out to get a better look at it and it was cracked about 1" to 1-½" near the top of the block near the head at the corner. I was going to replace the block until I found out about an old-timer who "stitched" cast iron blocks. His primary experience was with large cast machinery such as stationary engines, pumps, etc., but he also did engine blocks. I brought the Champion block to him for repair and watched while he did his artistry. After drilling a series of small holes along the length of the crack and slightly beyond both ends, he carefully peened in short rods of a "special nickel alloy" (as he described it then) and smoothed everything over. It never leaked again.

67689

67690

Anyone ever hear of this technique? Is it still done?

More info. See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pq0wfU4ZaKk

rusty nut garage
10-11-2017, 03:01 PM
I had a 289 repaired in a similar fashion. the crack is drilled, the holes are tapped and a tapered threaded rod is screwed in. the rods overlap one over the other. It makes a permanent nice repair. They have better luck using this method compared to welding. Welding cast iron is a crap shoot even by the most experienced welders.



I once owned a 1953 Champion coupe and found that shortly after I bought it, it had a cracked block at the right rear where it was hard to see. I pulled the engine out to get a better look at it and it was cracked about 1" to 1-½" near the top of the block near the head at the corner. I was going to replace the block until I found out about an old-timer who "stitched" cast iron blocks. His primary experience was with large cast machinery such as stationary engines, pumps, etc., but he also did engine blocks. I brought the Champion block to him for repair and watched while he did his artistry. After drilling a series of small holes along the length of the crack and slightly beyond both ends, he carefully peened in short rods of a "special nickel alloy" (as he described it then) and smoothed everything over. It never leaked again.





Anyone ever hear of this technique? Is it still done?

More info. See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pq0wfU4ZaKk

thunderations
10-11-2017, 03:19 PM
Just saw an ad on TV for a product that stops water leaks in anything. The guy promoting it slapped some on a tank that had water pouring out of a hole and then to top that, he cut a motor boat in half, taped it back together and piloted it across the lake at speed. Seems like a simple fix, huh?

70Avanti2
10-11-2017, 05:37 PM
I jb welded my tractor block decades ago and it has never leaked. Worth a shot.

rockne10
10-11-2017, 05:53 PM
A friend of mine JB-Welded the block in his drag car and continued to win races for several years; then sold that engine when he moved up to an aluminum hemi.

rockne10
10-11-2017, 05:54 PM
Didn't the engine powering the Rockne eventually become Studebakers big six cylinder engine?The Commander Six, YES! Not to be confused with the Big Six models of the 20's.

t walgamuth
10-12-2017, 08:25 AM
I third the jb weld. It will work on cracks and such that are not too severe.

christophe
10-12-2017, 10:21 AM
I once owned a 1953 Champion coupe and found that shortly after I bought it, it had a cracked block at the right rear where it was hard to see. I pulled the engine out to get a better look at it and it was cracked about 1" to 1-½" near the top of the block near the head at the corner. I was going to replace the block until I found out about an old-timer who "stitched" cast iron blocks. His primary experience was with large cast machinery such as stationary engines, pumps, etc., but he also did engine blocks. I brought the Champion block to him for repair and watched while he did his artistry. After drilling a series of small holes along the length of the crack and slightly beyond both ends, he carefully peened in short rods of a "special nickel alloy" (as he described it then) and smoothed everything over. It never leaked again.

67689

67690

Anyone ever hear of this technique? Is it still done?

More info. See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pq0wfU4ZaKk

Yes, this method is still in use. It is called metal stitching.
You can get some technical details here:https://www.metalock.co.uk/typical-on-site-repairs/metal-stitching.aspx and youtube has several videos about this.
Your car looks great, by the way.
Nice day to all.

drew72mgb
10-12-2017, 05:40 PM
Jay Leno's Garage on You Tube has an episode with the Christie Fire Engine - the block broke a BIG CHUNK out of it - spit the piston (a gallon paint can sized beast) out. The block was patched with stitching - and he does mention the company that repaired it -

Good luck!

rockne10
10-12-2017, 06:01 PM
If repairing is a viable option, definitely examine that action. While there are many later engines that would fit and function, there are few whose numbers can be traced to a Rockne. But, I also believe Robert Kapteyn has a Rockne engine available in Joliet, Illinois. He is rkapteyn on this forum. http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/member.php?1010-rkapteyn